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;-NRLF 




RKELEY 

JRARY 

/EKSfTY OF 
iLfFORNIA . 



x HISTORY 

OF 

> 

LODGE RISING STAR 

f 

OF 

WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S- C- 



BY 

RT. WOR. BRO : D. F, WADIA, 

Past Master of the Lodge and Past Honorary 
Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge 
of All Scottish Freemasonry in India. 

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PRINTED. AT THE 

BRITISH INDIA PRESS, BOMBAY. 

1912. 
[All rights reserved.] 



Printed by li. Miller, Superintendent British India Press, Itombay. 
Published by Lodge Rising Star ol Western India, No. 3 S.C., Bombay. 





Rt. Wor. Bro. Dr. Burnes, Provincial Grand Master of Western India 

and first Master of Lodge Rising Star, also, its Honorary 

Master for life. 




Rt. Wor. Bro. Maneckji Cursetji, Pioneer of Freemasonry in 

India. 



PREFACE 



EAST INDIA UNITED SERVICE CLUB, 
ST. JAMES'S SQUARE, S.W. 

I HAVE been asked to write a short preface to this 
History of Lodge Rising Star of Western India, and I do 
so with great pleasure and a certain degree of confidence 
because I was privileged to be present in Lodge on every 
occasion, save one, when that history, compiled with 
so much labour and devotion by Right Worshipful Brother 
D. F. Wadia, was read. Lodge " Rising Star," is, if my 
memory serves me right, the third oldest Lodge under 
the Scottish Constitution in India, but its claim to venera- 
tion rests upon higher ground than mere antiquity ; to 
her belongs the great honour in the West of India, of 
first enrolling Indian brethren in the Antient Craft, and 
the outcome of that action as set forth in this history 
the true masonic spirit displayed over long years by 
many of her worthy sons is in very truth more than 
justification of her initiation. Were it not invidious, I 
Gould mention many names on her rolls some here, some 
gorte-*whose work for the Craft is not only a measure of 
their own merit but redounds to the credit of their mother 
Lodge* Feeling as I do/ that Freemasonry in India has 
a great future before it, and a great work to accomplish, 
especially in the inculcation of tolerance and the removal 
of racial and religious prejudice, I can heartily commend 



342 



PREFACE 



EAST INDIA UNITED SERVICE CLUB, 
ST. JAMES'S SQUARE, S.W. 

I HAVE been asked to write a short preface to this 
History of Lodge Rising Star of Western India, and I do 
so with great pleasure and a certain degree of confidence 
because I was privileged to be present in Lodge on every 
occasion, save one, when that history, compiled with 
so much labour and devotion by Right Worshipful Brother 
D. F. Wadia, was read. Lodge " Rising Star," is, if my 
memory serves me right, the third oldest Lodge under 
the Scottish Constitution in India, but its claim to venera- 
tion rests upon higher ground than mere antiquity : to 
her belongs the great honour in the West of India, of 
first enrolling Indian brethren in the Antient Craft, and 
the outcome of that action as set forth in this history 
the true masonic spirit displayed over long years by 
many of her worthy sons is in very truth more than 
justification of her initiation. Were it not invidious, I 
could mention many names on her rollssome here, some 
gone whose work for the Craft is not only a measure of 
their own merit but redounds to the credit of their mother 
Lodge, Feeling as I do> that Freemasonry in India has 
a great future before it, and a great work to accomplish, 
especially in the inculcation of tolerance and the removal 
of racial and religious prejudice, I can heartily commend 



342 



a careful parusal of this history to earnest brethren, who 
seek to spread the teachings of the Antient Craft. It is 
a record of vicissitude and prosperity, of calm and stowpi, ( 
mayhap even of good and evil, but through it all runs a 
golden thread of honest endeavour, whose reward is the 
high estimation in which the Lodge is now held, and the 
honoured place it now occupies on the rolls of the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland. 



LONDON, ] R. H. FORMAN, 

> Grand Master of All Scottish 
May 13th, 1911. \ Freemasonry in India. 



CONTENTS. 


* 

PAGES 
CHAPTER I. 

184143. Movement for foundation of the Lodge. Petition 
to Provincial Grand! Master of Western 
India Agitation for admission of Indian 
Gentlemen in Freemasonary Initiative of 
Brother Maneckji Curteetji Reply of 
Provincial Grand Miaster ... /... 110 

CHAPTER II. 

184344. Establishment of the Lodge First meeting in 
the Town Hall Warrant First Bye-laws. 
Form of declaration to be signed by initiates. 
Mr. Ardeshir Cursetji Wadia, the First 
Indian gentleman (a, Parsee) and three 
Mogul Merchants initiated First anniver- 
sary meeting Founder's meda], also called 
Burne's or Fundator's medal instituted and 
resolutions regarding same Charter from 
GrandLotfge of Scotland First two Hono- 
rary members of the Lodge Account of 
iaiception of the Lodge by Dr Oliver in 
Freemason's Quarterly Review of 1844 
Account of a masonic banquet in the Bombay 
Courrier " Frater's " letter in the Free- 
mason's Quarterly Review 1844 meetings 
in " Lodge House" behind the Police Office 
M,azagon <. 1142 

CHAPTER III. 

1845. Resolution about extra membership of members 

of Lodge Perseverance Resolution of Lodge 
Perseverance reciprocating similar privilege. 
Election of Dr. ]?urnes as Honorary Master 
of the Lodge Brotherhood of "The Olive 
Branch in the East." 4354 

CHAPTER IV. 

1846. Brother Legeyt appointed! master of the 

Lod'ge Resolution of Grand Lodge regarding 



IV 

PAGES 

fees payable by the Lodge and Royal Arch 
Chapter to Lodge Perseverance for use of 
Lodge Premises etc. Founder's medal re- 
ceived from London Resolutions prescribing 
how and! when it should be worn by the 
members of the Lodge, and for every v * , 
initiate being invested therewith at the 
time of initiation ... L.j ... 5560 

CHAPTER V. 

1847 49- Resolutions about reconstruction of the Lodge. 
-Lodge meetings held in Lodge Rooms No. 5 
Grants Buildings, Colaba Initiation of 
Bhugwandas Beeneeram, a Jain the first 
Hindu member of the Lodge Election of Dr. 
Burnes as Honorary Master of the Lodge 
for life The last meeting of the Lodge 
attended by him Letter to Secretary of 
Nilgiri Lodge, Ootacumand ... ,.. <..-j 61 68 

CHAPTER VI. 

1850 51. Report of Committee appointed for examining 
accounts from 1844 to 1850 Increase of 
Lo:dge fees Differences between the Loftge 
and Lodge Perseverance regarding use of 
Lo'dige premises and dues payable to Lodge 
Perseverance Correspondence between the 
two Lodges thereon < 69 76 

CHAPTER VII. 

1852. Settlement of differences with Lodge Perse- 

veranceFinancial condition of the Lq^ge 
and investigation by a committee Report 
of committee thereon and on disputes with 
Lodge Perseverance Abrogation by Lodge 
Perseverance of Resolution regarding extra 
membership* accorded to members of the 
Lod'ge Revision of Bye-la~ws appointment 
of a Finance Committee Incident relating 
to Address presented by Lodge Perseverence 
to Brother Blowers Apology of Brother 
Ashbnrner Address presented to Brother 
Blowers by Lodge L'Anglaise St. John 
No. 204, Bordeaux, France through Viscount 
de Brons Cezerac "Grants Buildings" 
Colaba, hired for meetings of Masonic bodies 7787 



V 

PAGES 
CHAPTER VIII. 

1853 54. First Christian initiate Monthly subscription 

imposed on members of Lodge Perseverance. 

Abuse of right of ballot Internal harmony 

, disturbed Bye-laws reprinted M a s o n i c 

banquet to Lord Fitz-Clarence Resolution 

passed on retirement of Brother Legeyt. 

Institution of Standing Committee Brother 

K. R. Cama initiated First Past Master's 

Jewel presented Charitable fund started ... 88 98 

CHAPTER IX. 

1855. Legality of election of Brother W. H. S. 

Crawford as Master challenged Repre- 
sentation to Grand Lodge thereon, and' its 
decision Proceedings in Lodge and 1 fresh 
election of Master Charge against Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji for holding private 
meetings outside the Lodge Address to 
Brother Legeyt Alterations in Bye-laws 
Abuse of right of Ballot and animated dis- 
cussion thereon Institution of a dinner 
fee First report presenter] by a retiring 
Master of his Stewardship First Ins- 
tallation ceremony since the establishment 
of the Lodge performed by the Provincial 
Grand Master " The Indian Freemason's 
friend" t.. ..: ... 99111 

CHAPTER X. 

1856. Lodge temporarily closed owing to a paucity of 

members [and abuse of ballot 112 113 

CHAPTER XL 

1857. Resuscitation of the Lodge Brother Maneckji 

Cursetji elected! as Master First Indian 
Master of the LoxJge Installation ceremony 
performed by the Provincial Grand Master. 
The Master's address andl reference to a 
letter written by him on 20th January ' 
1854, to Brother JBarr on the subject of 
Ballot Revision of Bye-laws Suspension of 
Brothers Craig, Cross and O'Mealy 114118 

CHAPTER XII. 

185859. Brother Maneckji Cursetji re-installed' as 
Master Contribution towards the fund 



VI 

PAGES 

started for the Grand Lotige Templte in 
Scotland Proposal for building a masonic 
temple in Bombay Offer of ja piece of 
ground by Brother M'aneckji Cursetji upon 
certain conditions whiciR were not accept- v r 
able to a. committee appointed 1 by the Grand 
Lotfge to consider same Bequest by a 
Brother D. Seton to the Old* Lotfge Per- 
severance for the purpose of building a 
templfe at Bombay Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji electeld Master for the third timd 
Improving financial condition of the Lodge- 
Resolutions passed' for holding meetings at 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji's residence Re- 
solutions passed! for presenting Brother 
M&neckji Cursetji with an address and a 
Past Master's jewel and apron andi for a por- 
trait of his being placed in the Lodge Rooms. 119126 

CHAPTER XIII. 

186062. Address to Brother Cartwright and) presenta- 
tion of Founder's medial to him and contri- 
bution towards plate presented to him on 
his retirement from his office of Provincial} 
Grandi Master Death of Brother Legeyt 
Resolution to drink always to his memory 
fajt the festive-board Lodge fees reduced 
The Freemason's Quarterly Magazine subs- 
cribedDonation to the National! Wallace 
monument Regime of Brother K. R. Cama 
(1862) Revision of Bye-liaws and strict en- 
forcement of all rules Resolution passed for 
printing Bye-liaws and compiling 'a sketch of 
the history of the Lodge Fine imposed, 1 on 
members absenting themselves from meetings 
without excuse Address presented to Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji Complete set of Dr.. 
Oliver's Masonic Books ordered out Fund of 
Rs. 40,000 subscribed for building a Masonic 
Hall for the Lodge Plan and estimate sub- 
mitted by Lodge Perseverance Large Folio 
Volume of Zend; A vesta by Professor Wester- 
gar<| presented by Brother K. R. Cama to 
the Lo!dge Death of Dr. Burnes Resolution 
for coupling his name with that of Brother 
Le Geyt always at the Festive Board ... i f j 127140 



Vll 

PAGE 
CHAPTER XIV. 

1863. Brother M. C. Murzban initiated Brother 
Maneckji Curseftji elected Honorary? Member 
of Lodge Truth-Rejection of Brothers Judge 
* land Wickhman ias Honorary Members of 

the Lo$ge Correspondence thereon between 
Brother Judge land the Lofdge and between 
Brother Judge 'and Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji Emergent meeting heLd for con- 
doling with Brother Maneckji Cursetji on 
the death of his son Mr. Hinaji Visit of 
Brother C. J. Taracha-ndto Lodge L'Anglaise 
No. 204 ; of Bordeaux and presentation by 
that Lodge to him of a me'dal and) a list of 
its members Scheme for a common Masonic 
^Halil for the use of English, Scotch or Irish 
masons The " Ganj-nameh presented by 
Brother M. C. IJangrana to the Lodge .... 141146 

CHAPTER XV. 

186465* Brother A. F. Moos presented with Burne's 
medial for translating Bye- Haws anid getting 
them printed) " Masonic Manual' " and "The 
Scottish Freemason's Magazine" Resolu- 
tion of regret at .the death of the Duke of 
Athole, Grand 1 Master Mason of Scotland 
The Framji Cawasji Masonic Hall The 
The Indian Journal of Freemasonry The 
Freemason's Magazine and Masonic 
Mirror Proposed initiation of Dastur 
Hoshangji Jamasji High priest of the Dec- 
can Past Masters of the Lodge elected by 
Lodge Concord of Instruction as its Hono- 
rary members Resolution granting pre- 
villege of extra membership to members of 
other lodges rescinded Offices of jeweller, 
ArchitectBearer of the Sacred Volume and 
Organist instituted Prospectus issued in 
connection with the scheme for the Framji 
Cawasji Masonic Hall Presentation by Bro- 
ther C. N. Cama of clothing and jewels of 
the Provincial Grand Lodge Office-bearers 
Presentation by Brother C. N. Cama of 
clothing of office-bearers of the Lodge with- 
a set of jewels in silver The Lodge proceed- 
ings printed in the Masonic Record ...' .... 147153 



vi 

PAGES 

started for the Grand Lotige TempDe in 
Scotland Proposal for building $ masonic 
temple hi Bombay Offer of ia piece of 
ground by Brother M'aneckji Cursetji upon 
certain conditions whicKj were not accept- * , ( 
able to a committee appointed' by the Grand 
Loxige to consider same Bequest by a 
Brother D. Seton to the 01,65 LokJge Per- 
severance for the purpose of building a 
templie at Bombay. Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji elected! Master for the third timeh- 
Improving financial! condition of the Lodge 
Resolutions passed' for hokUng meetings at 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji's residence Re- 
solutions passed! for presenting Brother 
Mlslneckji Cursetji with an address and a 
Past Master's jewel and apron anidi for a por- 
trait of his being placed in the Lodge Rooms. 119126 

CHAPTER XIII. 

186062. Address to Brother Cartwright and presenta- 
tion of Founder's medal to him and! contri- 
bution towards plate presented) to him on 
his retirement from his office of Provincial! 
Grand/ Master Death of Brother Legeyt 
Resolution to drink always to his memory 
iajt the festive-board Lodge fees reduced 
The Freemason's Quarterly Mlagazine subs- 
cribedDonation to the National! Wallace 
monument Regime of Brother K. R. Cama 
(1862) Revision of Bye-laws an ! d strict en- 
forcement of all rules Resolution pa'ssedi for 
printing Bye-laws and compiling a sketch of 
the history of the Lodge Fine imposed 1 on 
members absenting themselves from meetings 
without excuse Address presenteld to Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji Complete set of Dr.. 
Oliver's Masonic Books ordered out Fund of 
Rs. 40,000 subscribed for building a Masonic 
Hall for the Lodge Plan and estimate sub- 
mitted by Lodge Perseverance Large Folio 
Volume of Zend Avesta by Professor Wester- 
gar<J presented by Brother K. R- Cama to 
the Loidge Death of Dr. Burnes Resolution 
for coupling his name with that of Brother 
Le Geyt always at the Festive Board .. ;, : 127140 



vii 

PAGE 
CHAPTER XIV. 

1863. Brother M. C. Murzban initiated Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji elected; Honorary? Member 
of Lodge Truth-Rejection of Brothers Judge 
> % land Wickhman as Honorary Members of 

the Lo$ge Correspondence thereon between 
Brother Judge land the Loidge and between 
Brother Judge and Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji Emergent meeting held for con- 
doling with Brother Maneckji Cursetji on 
the death of his son Mr. Hiraji Visit of 
Brother C. J. Tarachandto Lodge L'Anglaise 
No. 204 ! of Bordeaux and presentation by 
that Lodge to him of a. medial and) a list of 
its members Scheme for a common Masonic 
^Halil for the use of English, Scotch or Irish 
masons The " Ganj-nameh presented by 
Brother M. C. Eangrana to the Lodge .... 141146 

CHAPTER XV. 

1864-65- Brother A. F. Moos presented with Burne's 
medial for translating Bye- laws anfcB getting 
them printed!" Masonic Manual' " and "The 
Scottish Freemason's Magazine" Resolu- 
tion of regret at the death of the Duke of 
Athole, Grand Master Mason of Scotland 
The Framji Cawasji Masonic Hall The 
The Indian Journal of Freemasonry The 
Freemason's Magazine and Masonic 
Mirror Proposed initiation of Diastur 
Hoshaingji Jamasji High priest of the Dec- 
can Past Masters of the Lodge elected by 
Lodge Concord of Instruction as its Hono- 
rary members Resolution granting pre- 
viliege of extra membership to members of 
other lodges rescinded Offices of jeweller, 
ArchitectBearer of the Sacred Volume and 
Organist instituted Prospectus issued in 
connection with the scheme for the Framji 
Cawasji Masonic Hall Presentation by Bro- 
ther C. N. Cama of ctothing and jewels of 
the Provincial Grand Lodge Office-bearers 
Presentation by Brother C. N. Cama of 
clothing of office-bearers of the Lodge with- 
a set of jewels in silver The Lodge proceed- 
ings printed in the Masonic Record ..,' .... 147153 



viii 

PAGES 
CHAPTER XVI. 

186667. Brother Darasha R. Chichgur initiated 
Brother C. N. Cama appointed Depute 
Master and voted Burne's medial Objection 
of the Lodge to Lodge St. Andrews in the 
East No. 343 S. C. admitting residents of 
Bombay Representation to the Grand 
Lodge on the subject Presentation by 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji of a Scotch Mace 
with silver mountings for use of the Grand 
Lodge Silver Vase presented by the Lodge 
to Brother C. N. Cama Presentation of an 
address and a gold jewel or plate voted to 
Brother R. B. Barton Masonic Library 
projected and contribution by the Lodge 
towards its establishment Draft Trust Deed 
and appointment of trustees of the land fo? 
The Framji Cawasji Masonic Hall Resolu- 
tion of condolence on the death of Brother 
Dr. OHver Enquiry into the conduct of 
Brother Framji Bomonji 153158 

CHAPTER XVII,. 

1868. Mastership of Brother M. C. Murzban 

Brother Morland presented with Founder's 
me'dal Trial of Brother Framji Bomonji 
for a Masonic offence and his expulsion 
Contribution by Brother Meidinger to the 
charity funds of the Lodge Presentation of 
gold pl'ate to" Brother Barton in Yarborough 
Lodge, Brighton, by Brother Dadabhai 
Naoroji on behalf of the Lodge An account 
of the proceedings in the Brighton Gazettee 
of 24th September 1868 Brother Murzban 
re-elected Master 159169 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

1869. P. M- Mehta initiated Presentation of 

Past Master 's jewels to 5 Past Masters 
Goverment Loan Note of 4 per cent, of the 
nominal value of Rs. 50 r O presented to the 
Lodge by brother M. M, Sethna " The Mer- 
chant of Venice " and a Farce " Our New 
Man " performed by the Parsi Elphinstone 
Dramatic Club at the Grant Road Theatre 
under the patronage of the R. W. M. Officers 



PAGES 

and Brethren of the Lodge on 13th February 
1869 and attendance of Masons in Masonic 
cpstume Burne's goW medial voted to 
BrotherC. N. Cama Lectures and Instruc- 
tion meetings Three large tracing boards 
, ' handsomely illuminated presented by Brother 

Pestonji Hormasji Cama to the Lodge ... 171 176 

CHAPTER XIX. 

187071. Distribution of charity in distant lands and 
foreign countries Presentation to Brother 
Murzban of Past Master's jewel, Founder's 
medal and silver cup and his portrait hung 
in the Masonic Hall Brother Morljand the 
Provincial Grand 1 Master presented by a 
Special Deputation from Lodge Felix No. 355 
S. C. of Aden with a Vellum Ro\l contain- 
ing his appointment as Honorary! Member 
thereof Meetings in Masonic HaLl at 
Mazgaon in 1870 Trust Deed of the Lanft 
endowed by Brother N. N. Framji for the 
Framji Cawasji Ma-sonic Hall executed in 
favour of Brothers K. R. Cama and M. C. 
Murzban as trustees for the Lodge Meetings 
in Bunglow at Gowalia Tank Road Testi- 
monial to the Earl of Dalhousie* Past Grand 
Master Mason of Soctland Gold-jewel consist- 
of a fcey with a suitable inscription and ap- 
ron with sash presented to Brother C, N. Cama 
and Founder's medal to Brother D. R. 
Chichgur Reports of committeof represent- 
atives of the Scottish Masonic bodies anent 
Masonic Hall and contribution by the Lodge 
towards the scheme propounded thereunder .... 177 182 

CHAPTER XX. 

187273. Regime of Brother D- R. Chichgur Lectures on 
masonic subjects Re-institution of a dinner 
fee Charity funds transferred to names of 
four trustees Brother K. R. Cama presented 
with Past Master's clothing and jewel with 
full masonic honours Address of condolence 
to Lady Mayo Provincial Grand Master's 
scheme for the formation of a general bene- 
volent fund and building a Masonic Hall First 



PAGES 

visit of a Hindu Mason to the Lodge Letter 
to Lodge Cyrus about admission of Hindus into 
the craft Brother, P. M. Mehta Master during 
1873 Brother D. R. Chichgur presented with 
Past Master's jewel and time-piece by the ( 
Lodgje and a valuable masonic work by the 
Right Worshipful Master Reception of Bro- 
ther Maneckji Cursetji as Honorary Depute 
Provincial Grand Master with the Grand 
Lodge Dinner fee abolished Funeral Lodges 
held for the first time since the establishment of 
the Lodge in memory of a member and an ex- 
member, who was a Past Master Donation of 
Rs. 500 made by Mr. Ardeshir Merwanji Sett 
in memory of his father M. M. Sett ..4 ... 183190 

CHAPTER XXI. 

t 
1874 75. Funeral lodges held in memory of a member and 

an ex-member Installed Master's degree con- 
ferred The Jamslhedi Navroz Masonic 
Festival Presentation of an address byj the 
Grand L'odgie A. S. F. L and the District 
Grand Lodge and Masters Wardens and 
Brethren of all English iand Scotch Lodges in 
Bombay on llth November 1875 to His Royal 
Highness The Prince of Wales as the Grand 
Master of the United Fraternity of Ancient 
Free and Accepted masons of England and 
Patron of Scotch Freemasonry The Burne's 
medal presented by the Lodge to His RoyalHigh- 
ness on the llth November 1875 at the hands 
the Grand Master, A. S. F. I., on the occasion 
of the laying of the Foundation Stone of the 
Prince's Dock by His Royal Highness accord- 
ing to masonic rites and ceremonies Presenta- 
tion of an address by the Lodge to Brother 
Morland on the assumption of title of Grand 
Master, A. S. F. I. Lodge Banner 191197 

CHAPTER XXII. 

1876. Resignation of Brother Maneckji Cursetji and 

his election as an Honorary member Conduct 
of Brother Bamonji Cursetji Ashburner in 
publishing a book on Freemasonry containing 
insuniations against its principles, etc., 



XI 

PAGES 
brought to the Notice of the Lodge by Brother 

P. M. ICTehta and action of the Lodge there- 
on Resignation of that brother Brother 
J ' K. R. Cama appointed life-member of the 
Scottish Masonic Benevolent Fund on behalf 
of the Lodge Celebration of the Jamshedi 
Navroz Festival Differences between Brother 
Darashaw R. Reporter (R. W. M.) and the 
Grand Master A. S. F. I. anent the non- 
attendance of the Grand Master at the ins- 
tallation of the former Foundation of Lodge 
Islam and Resolution of the Lodge regarding 
same and Correspondence thereon with the 
Grand Master Attendance of the Grand 
Master with the Grand Lodge Officers at a 
meeting of the Lodge and their withdrawal 
from it after the Grand Master's leaving the 
Founder's medal presented to him at the altar 
of the Lodge... 198203 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

1877 79. Differences between the Lodge and the Grand 
Master made up Treasurer's jewel voted to 
Brother C. N. Cama Celebration of the 
Jamshedi Navroz Festival Lodge Meetings 
in the Nawab's Bungalow Mazagon Pre- 
sentation of ;a sword to the Lodge by Brother 
S. J. Mehta Funeral Lodges held in memory 
of Brothers R. C. Bahadfurji and R. J. 
Nadirshaw and resolutions of condolence 
Farewell demonstration and banquet in 
honour of Brother The Honourable Mr. 
Justice James Gibbs, District Grand Master 
of Bombay, and its territories by the District 
Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge A. S. P. I. 
Address by the Lodge to Brother Gibbs 
and his reply.... 204209 

CHAPTER XXIV. 

188081. Election of Master mad 3 by mistake wHile 
Lodge was open in the 1st degree validiated 
by Grand Master's special dispensation 
Gold chain and pencil presented to Brother 
C. N, Cama Celebration of the Jamshedi 
Navroz Festival all ex-mambers invited to 
join therein Bye-laws revised and passed 



Xll 

PAGES 

and reprinted Lecture by Brother D. R. 
Chichgur on " Chemical facts illustrating 
principles of Freemasonry" Grand Lodge 
scheme to form a joint stock company for < 
the construction of a Masonic Hall, to be 
called " The Framji Cawasji Masonic Hall ".... 210217 

CHAPTER XXV. 

1882 83. Celebration of Jamshed'i Navroz Festival 
European Brothern joining in it Movement 
and resolution of Grand Lodge about placing 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji's portraitin the 
Freemason's Hall and committee appointed to 
'carry out the object Scheme of Brother 
K. R. Cama for life membership of the 
Lodge Inquiry into the conduct of Brother 
M. C. Langarana for unmasonic conduct Re- 
solution of the Lodge to sell the land conveyed 
to its trustees Masonic Hall project brought 
to a head Scheme to buy a bungalow at 
Clare Road, Byculla, by forming a joint stock 
company to be called "The Framji Cawasji 
Freemason's Hall Association Ld." another 
project to build a Freemason's Hall on the 
Esplanade Road a third project to build a 
Hall on a plot near the Young Men's Christian 
Association Contribution by the Lodge of 
the Nawroji Nanabhai Trust Funds on certain 
conditions Sale of the land conveyed to the 
Trustees Brother C. S. Patel Tyler of the 
Lodge for 40 years presented with a gold 
watch Donation to the fund for presenting 
a portrait of Brother Balfour on his retire- 
ment from office of Grand Master Burne's 
medal presented and! Honorary membership 
conferred on His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Connanght, K. G., Past Grand Warden of 
the United Grand Lodge of ancient, free and 
accepted masons of England) 218232 

CHAPTER XXVI. 

1884. Mastership of Brother R. M. Chichgur Celc- 

bration of the Jamshedi Navroz Festival 
Donation of Rs. 500 by Brother Naoroji 
Fardoonji His Royal Highness the Prince 



Xlll 

PAGES 

of Wales' plumes in carved brass gilt and 
silvered!, presented to the Lo%e by Brother 
Charles B. Leonard, Gunner of H. M .S 
" Dragon " Resolution for procuring a 
9 new die of the Fund,ator's medal Lodge 
Meetings at " Huntley Lod^e *' Clare Road, 
Byculla Brother M. C. Murzban made 
Honorary Depute Grand Master and Brother 
D. R, Chichgur, Honorary substitute Grand 
Master, A. S. F. I .23334 

CHAPTER XXVII. 

1885 Bro : R. M. Ghichghur re-elected Master Lec- 

tures on Masonic subjects General M. Mul- 
labymade Honorary Member Death of Bro: 
C.N. Cama Funeral Lodge in his memory 
ijOration by Bro: Dadabhoy Naoroji Death 
of Bro: Nawroji Fardoonji Lodge of sorrow 
in his memory by Grand Lodge Testimonial 
and banquet to Brother D.R. Chichgur Cele- 
bration of the Jamshedji Navroze Festival ... 23540 

CHAPTER XXVIII. 

1886 Privilege conferred by the Grand Master mason 

of Scotland on Brother D.R. Chichgur of 
wearing the Burne's medal within a wreath 
of Roses and Thistles Death of Brother 
James Gibbs Brother Sorabji Sapoorji Ben- 
galee and Pestonji Hormasji Cama elected 
Honorary members- Jamshedji Navroze Festi- 
val celebrated ... ... ... ... 24143 

CHAPTER XXIX. 

1887 Banquet to Brother Sir Henry Morland Cele- 

bration of the Jamshedji Navroze Festival 
Death of Brother Maneckji Cursotji Fune- 
ral Lodge in his memory Resolutions to per- 
petuate his memory Grand Lodge A. S.F.I, 
and District Grand Lodge and daughter 
lodges in mourning Resolution to drink 
always to his memory at the Festive board ... 244 47 

CHAPTER XXX. 

188889 Visit of H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught to the 
Lodge His election as an Honorary member 
Picture of Brother Dr Burnes presented by 



xiv 

PAGES 

Mr C. M. Cursetji Brother Sir William 
Clarke, Bart, and Dr Jullins Wilmot M. D. 
elected Honorary Members jewel presented 
to Brother D.R. Chichgur by the Grand Mas- 
ter of England Celebration of the JamsheViji . 
Navroze Festival followed by a Discourse 
and entertainment Freemason's Hall question 
further discussed Deaths of Brothers H. F. 
Cooper S.B. Turkhad and C. N. Pavri 
Brother K. R. Cama made Depute Grand 
Master A.S.F.I. ... ... 248-56 

CHAPTER XXXI. 

1390 93 Donations by Brothers Malek-0-Tajjar (ex- 
Go verner of Bushire)and M.M. Bhownugree 
of Rs. 500 each and by Brother H. M. Chich- 
gur of Re 1 Movement for portrait of Brother 
K.R. Cama to be hung in the Freemason's 
Hall and contribution by the Lodge Farewell 
entertainment and conversazione in honour of 
H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught-Lectures 
by Brother Temulji B. Nurriman (R.W.M. in 
1891-92) on masonic subjects Death of the 
Grand Master A.S.F.I. Captain Sir Henry 
Morland on 37th July 1891 Contribution by 
the Lodge of Rs. 100 to the Henry Morland 
Memorial Fund for perpetuating his memory 
and Resolution thereon Hall Committee 
scheme to buy the Nawab of Bella's Bungalow 
at Grant road Resolution of the Lodge to take 
Counsel's opinion regarding the gift of ths 
Nawroji Nanabhai Trust Funds amounting 
to Rs. 12,000 to the Hall Committee Congra- 
tulatory address to Broth erDadabhai Nawroji 
on his becoming a member of Parliament- 
Brother D. R. Chichgur appointed Grand 
Master Depute Celebration of the 50 years' 
Jubilee of the Lodge Brother Framji Din- 
shew Petit Jubilee Master installed on 15th 
December 1893 Printed short sketch of the 
history of the foundation of the Lodge pre- 
pared by Brothers P.M. Kanga and P.C. 
Sethna circulated amongst the members and 
a short account of the foundation of the Lodge 
given by Brother K.R. Kama Jubilee medal 



PAGES 

struck and prominent members 'and Masons 
created Honorary, members to commemorate 
the Jubilee Letter to Brother W.L. Harvey 
Master of Lodge perseverance and his 
reply Endowment'by the Lodge of Rs. 2,500 
in memory of Brothers Dr Burnes and 
Maneckji Cursetji Donation of Rs. 2,500 
each by Brothers Framji Dinshiaw Petit and 
Sir Dinshaw Maneckji Petit Bart. Second 
contribution by the Lodge of Rs. 500 to the 
Morland Memorial Fund Letters from the 
Grand Master Mason ;of Scotland and the 
Grand Master A. S.F.I, acknowledging the 
printed pamphletof the history: of the Founda- 
tion of the Lodge and from various bodies and 
masons congratulating the Lodge on its Jubi- 
lee Deaths of Brothers Hormasji Pestonji 
Cama and Sorabji Sapoorji Bengalee and 
funeral Lodges in their memory Donation of 
Rs. 500 by Brother Nawroji Pestopji Cama 
Rs. 1,000 endowed b^ the Lodge in memory 
of Brother S.S. Bengalee Celebration of the 
Jamsedji Navroze Festival? oil owed by a Dis- 
course The Poetry of the craft " and an 
Entertainment comprising a farce called 
"A Sudden Arrival" and a Commedietta 
"Marriage by Telephone" Attendance of 
European and Native ladies at the Banquet 
and Entertainment ... ... ...256274 

CHAPTER XXXII 

1894 96 Congratulatory! address to Brother: Currim- 
bhoy Ebrahim on his donation of Rs. 1 lac 
for founding a Mahomedan Orphanage 
Donation by the Brother: of Rs. 250 to the 
Lodge Celebration of the Jamshedji Navroze 
Festival followed by a Dramatic Perform- 
ance Attendance of Ladies Scheme of the 
Joint tlall Committee to acquire by hire or 
purchase a building or building site for a 
common Masonic Hall Meetings in the Adel- 
phi Hotel premises, Byculla Arrival of the 
Jubilee medal Presentation thereof and of 
a past master's jewel and ai walnut wood 
writing desk aftd a walnut wood! stand to 



XVI 

PAGES 

Brother Framji Dmshaw Petit at the Instal- 
lation meeting of 1894 Brother F: D. Petit 
made substitute Grand Master A, S, F. I. 
Death of Brother Framji Dinshaw Petit on 
8th August 1895 Congratulations to Brother , 
M. M. Bhawnuggree on his being elected a 
member of the British House of Commons 
Presentation of the Jubilee medal to Brother 
C. D. Furdoonji Celebration of the Jamshedji 
Navroze Festival Scheme of the Hall Com- 
mittee to acquire the present site of the 
Masonic Hall and its appeal to different lod- 
ges Chapters and Bodies for help and to the 
Lodge for a gift of the Navroji Nanabhai 
Trust Funds on condition of naming the large 
Banquetting Hall "The Framji Cawasji Ban- 
quetting Hall" and putting up a suitable tab- 
let Resolution of the Lodgse to file a friendly 
suit regarding the gift of tJie N. N. Trust 
Funds as advised by the Advocate- General ... 275 283 

CHAPTER? XXXIII 

1897- Visit of H. E. The Rt. Honourable Lord Sandhurst, 
Governor of Bombay and District-Grand Mas- 
ter of Bombay E. C. on the occasion of tne 
Installation of Brother P. M. Kanga His 
Lordship made Honorary member Death of 
Brother Abdulla Meheralll Dharamsey Suit 
No 352 of 1897 filled by the Lodge regarding 
the Navroji Nanabhai Trust Funds Nomina- 
tion and' Installation of Lord Sandhurst as 
Grand Master A. S. F. I. Foundation Stone 
laid by the Grand Master of the Masonic 
Hall on 5th June 1897- Brothers N.N. Wadia 
and D.R. Chichgur appointed Trustees of the 
Freemason's Hall Second visit of H. E. Lord 1 
Sandhurst to the Lodge on the occasion of the 
Installation of Brother. P. C. Sethna, Brother 
H. M. Chichgur made Honorary Substitute 
Grand Master A. S. F. I- Third contribution 
by the Lodge of Rs. 150" to the Henry Mor- 
land' Memorial Fund ... 284289 

Chapter XXXIV. 

1898-1900 Death of Brother Burjorji Pallonji Dollimeherji, 
Funeral service in his memory and Oration by 



xvii 

PAGES 

Brother K. R. Cama Lectures on masonic 
sub jects Decree in suit 353 of 1897 Gift of 
the Nawroji Nanabhai Trust Funds to The 
' Hall Committee Agreement between the 

Trustees of the Funds and The Hall Commit- 
tee Brother K. R. Cama nominated by the 
Lodge as its member of the Hall Committee 
Testimonial to Brother J.W. Smith I.P.G.M. 
Third visit of Lord Sandhurst to the Lodge 
Investiture of Brother Dr. Pollen as Grand 
Master Depute A.S.F. I. Brothers Sir Lawren- 
ce H. Jenkins (Chief Justice of Bombay;) Dr. 
Pollen and I. M. Shields made Honorary mem- 
bers The Framji Cawasji Banqueting Hall & 
Tablet Attempt to revive the Jamshedi Nav- 
'roze Festival Consecration of the Masonic 
Hall by Lord Sandhurst on 25-3-99 Annony- 
mous donation of Rs. 5,000 to the Hall, 
Building Fund to' perpetuate His Lordship's 
Regime One rupee testimonial to Brother D. 
R. Chichgur in recognition of his services as 
Secretary to the Hall Committee and presenta- 
tion of a silver bowl and cup to him Deaths 
of Brothers N. N. Wadia, J. C. Cama and 
Manekshaw Jehangirshaw Talyarkhan-Funeral 
lodges in their memory Farewell banquet to 
Lord Sandhurst on 9-2-1900 Presentation 
of an Autograph album to Brother D. R. Chi= 
chgur in special recognition of his services to 
Masonry and particularly as Secretary to the 
Hall Committee Congratulations to Brother 
M. M. Bhownugree on his re-election las a 
member of Parliament Lord Sandhurst suc- 
ceeded by Lord Northcote as Grand Master 
A. S. F. I. ... ... ... ... 29030: 

Chapter XXXV 

100103 Death of H. M. Queen VictoriaResolution passed 
by the Lodge theiton at meeting held on 9th 
February 1901 Death of Brother Captian C. 
D. Wi.se Contribution by the Lodge towards 
the MemorialPurse fund raised by the Grand 
Lodge A. S. F. I. The Framji Petit Council- 
Brother M. M. Bhownuggree made Honorary 
Grand Master Depute Deaths of Brothers Dr. 



xviii 

PAGES 

Ismail Janmahomed DossabhaiFraniji Kara- 
ka C. S. I. and Rehimtoola M. Sayani Resolu- 
tion regarding Lodge Library Lectures on 
masonic subjects Completion of theGth decade ( , 
of the Lodge on 15th, December 1903 ... 303309 

CHAPTER XXXVI 

190405 Attempt by Brother Maneck R. Sethna (R. W. M. 
in 1904) to revive the Jamsedi Navroze Festi- 
val Sorting and location of Lodge Records 
New die of the Fundator's medal Death of 
Brother K. N. Kabraji Election of Bro. R. 
H.J. Rustomji Lively debate thereon and 
retirement from meeting of Brother K. R. 
Cama during the ballot Resolution congra- 
tulating Sir P.M. Mehta on the Knighthood 1 
conferred on him by His Majesty the King 
Emperor Surprise visit to theLodge of the 
ceremonial committee of the Grand Lodge. 
A. S.F.I, and their complete satisfaction with 
its excellent working Celebration of the 
Unique event of 50 Year's Masonic Jubilee 
of Brother K.R. Cama Resolutions of the 
Lodge at an emergent meeting held! on 24th 
August 1904 congratulating Brother K.R. 
Cama and reply of Brother K.R. Cama 
Appointment of H. E. The Rt. Hon. Lord 
Lamington Governor of Bombay as Grand 
Master A. S.F.I. Marble bust of Brother 
D.R. Chichgur unveiled in The Masonic Hall 
by His Excellency on 4th Augustj 1904 
Brother Sir L. H. Jenkins presented with 
the Burne' s medal Lord Lamington elected 
Honorary Member of the Lodge Resolution 
passed at an emergent meeting 
congratulating Brother Sir Currimbhai 
Ebrahim on the knighthood bestowed on him 
by His Magesty the King Emperor Dona- 
tion by Sir Currimbh'ai Ebrahim of Rs. 500 
to the charity funds of the Lodge 310321 

CHAPTER XXXVII. 

190608. First Official Visit of H. E. Lord Lamington 
Grand Master at the Installation of Brother 
D. F. Wadia Death of Brother Hormasji M. 



xix 

PAGES 

Chichgur Revision of Bye-laws Office of 
Chaplain instituted Lodge fees raised to 
Rs. 400 Visit of Brother C. H. Captain to 
Lodge Benjamin B. French No. 15 Washing- 
> > ton TJ. S. A. Laying of the foundation 

Stone of the Sir. William Moore Operation 
Theatre at the Sir Jamsetji Jijibhai Hospi- 
tal with Masonic rites by Lord Lamington. 
Donation by Brother D. F. Wadia of Rs. 500 
to the charity funds of the Lodge. Project 
of equipping the Masonic Hall with Electric 
lights and fans and contribution of the 
Lodlge thereto. Presentation of the Cama 
Masonic Jubilee Volume to Brother K. R. 
Cama with an addlress at a Special Meeting 
held on 12th March 1907 by Lord Lamington 
' Grand Master Masonic Lectures Donation 
by Brother K. B. Sharoff of Rs. 500 to the 
charity funds of the Lodge Fund started 1 
for oil painting of Lord Lamington Contri- 
bution of the Lodge thereto Death of Bro- 
ther Dossabhai Dadabhai Albless 50 copies 
of the Cama Masonic Jubilee volume and 
Rs. 58-13 presented to the Lodge by 
Brother J. J. Mody Further A contribution 
of Rs. 400, by the Lodge to the EleDt- 
ric Lights Fund Contribution to the 
Hydrabad Relief Fund Complete register 
of the members of the Lodge from 15th 
December 1843 to 15th December 1908 com- 
piled by Brother D. F. Wadia presenten to the 
Lodge Brother D. R. Wadia's donation of 
Rs. 500 on his installation as Master asso- 
ciated with the name of his Grandfather the 
late Brother Ardeshir Cursetji Wadi and 
Brother Pheroze C. Sethna's d'onation of Rs. 
500 in memory of his father First official 
visit of Most Wor. Brother Col. R. H. Fore- 
man, Grand Master. A. S. F. I. at the instal- 
lation meeting keld on 16th December 1908... 322330 

CHAPTER XXXVIII 

190911. Death) of Brother K. R. Camia on 20th August 
1909 after an Unique masonic career of 55 
years of continued activity. Special Fu- 



XX 

PAGES 

nera Grand Lodge held in his memory by the 
Grand Lodge A.S.F.I. on 20th September 
1909 and Resolutions passed by Grand Lodge 
Steps taken by the Most Worshipful the ( 
Grand Master Brother Foreman for perpet- 
uating his memory by (I) the Cama Memo- 
rial Fund iand (II) a Memorial Tablet Re- 
solutions passed by the Lodge on the death 
of Brother Cama Sermon by Brother D. R. 
Chichgur Rs. 1000/ set apart from the Lodge 
Charity Funds in his name as an endowment to 
be supplemented by donations from individual 
members Resolution to drink to his memory 
at the Festive Board Public meeting held in 
memory of Brother K. R Cama under the 
chairmanship of H. E. Sir George Sydenham 
Clarke, Governor or Bombay Death of 
Brother Dadabhai S. Munsiffna and a don- 
ation of Rs. 500 in his memory by a respected 
member of the Lodge Donation of Rs. 5007- 
by Brother Darashaw Bejonji Mehta 
(R. W. M, 1910) twards the charity funds 
of the Lodge Resolution congratulating 
Brother Sfr Currimbhai Ebrahim Bart., on 
his munificent gift of Rs, 4 lacs for a College 
of Science and on the title of Baronetcy con- 
ferred on him by H. M, The King Emperor 
Death of His most Most Gracious Majesty 
Edward VII on 6th May 1910 and Resolution 
passed by the Lodge thereon The In Memo- 
riam Tablet of Brothsr K, R. Cama with a 
Medallion of the deceased Brother surmount- 
ing it erected and placed in the Masonic 
Hall Honorary membership conferred on 
M. W. Brother Colonel Forman and Burne's 
medail presented to him Brother P. C. 
Sethna made substitute Grand Master and 
Brother Meherally Dewraj Master created 
Honorary Substitute Grand Master History 
of the Lodge from 1843 to 1910 compiled by 
Brother D. F. Wadia and presented to the 
Lodge at the Installation meeting held on 16th 
December 1910 Resolution of the Lodge 
for publishing the History and presenting an 
Edition 'de luxe with the Resolution embodied 



XXI 

PAGES 

therein n~l also a Historian's jewel com me- 
morative of the event to Brother D. P. Wadia 
Deiath of Brother A. F. Unwalla Funeral 
Lodge held in his memory Fund for perpet- 
uating the services rendered by Brother 
Colonel Forman to Freemasonry and for 
retaining a fitting memorial of same and 
presenting a Souvenir to him and contribution 
by the Lodge thereto Brother The Hon'ble 
D'r. Tamulji B, Nariman appointed Grand 
Master Depute A. S. F. I. (1911) Unveiling 
by him of the marble medallion of Brother 
K. R. Cama on llth November 1911 
History of the LoJge brought up to 1911.... 331347 



APPENDIX A. 

Charter of the Lodge granted by the Grand Lodge of 
Scotland ... 348-361 

APPENDIX B 
Letters from Honorary members of the Lodge 351-359 

APPENDIX C 

Letter from Bro: Maneckji Cursetji to the Secretary 
Nilghiri Lodge 359-361 

APPENDIX D 

Correspondence with Lodge Perseverance regarding use 
of Lodge rooms 361-36'8 

APPENDIX E 

Report of Special Committee on differences between the 
Lodge and Lod'ge Perseverance 368-371 

APPENDIX F 
Letter of apology from Bro. C. E. Ashburner 372 

APPENDIX G 

Testimonial from Lodge L'AngPais, Bordeaux, to Bro. 
Blowers .' 372-373 

APPENDIX H 

Letter from Provincial Grand Secretary to the R. W. 
Master of the Lodge anent election of Bro. W. H. S. 
Crawford and Bro. M. M. Settna's statement ... 373-377 



xxii 

PAGES 
APPENDIX I 

Bro. Maneckji Cursetji's letter to Bro.i Barr on the 
subject of ballot dated 20th July 1854 377-384 

APPENDIX J 

Address presented to Bro. Maneckji Cursetji and his reply 
thereto 385-388 

APPENDIX K 

Letters from Bro. Dr. Oliver and other j distinguished 
masons on presentation of the Foundator's Medal to 
them 388-392 

APPENDIX L 

Correspondence between Bro. 1 Maneckji Cursetji land the 
Lod'ge and between him and Bro G. S. Judge, an^d 
betwee the Lodge and Bro. G. S. Judge ^... 392-397 

APPENDIX M 

Letter from the Secretary of the Lodge to the Provincial 
Grand Secretary protesting against Lodge St. Andrews 
in the East initiating residents of Bombay 397-399 

APPENDIX N 

Trust Deed dated 3rd May 1870 400-408 

APPENDIX 

Letter from the Master of the Lodge to the W- M. of 
Lodge Cyrus 408-410 

APPENDIX P 

Address presented to Bro. The Hon'ble James Gibbs and 
reply thereto ... 410-415 

APPENDIX Q 
Decree in High Court suit No. 352 of 1897 ... 416-420 

APPENDIX R 

Agreement dated 18-11-1898 between the Hall Com- 
mittee and the Trustees of the Trust Deed, dlated 
35-1870 ... 420-422 

APPENDIX S 
Address presented to Bro. K, R, Cama 423-424 

APPENDIX T 

Correspo idence between the R. W, Master of the Lodge 
and the Grand Master and Secretary, Grand Lodge on 
the occasion of the death of Bro. K, R. Cama 424-430 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Rt. Wor. Bro. Dr. James Burnes ... ... ...Back of title page 

Rt. Wor. BICJ Maneckji Cursetji ... ... 

Burnes Medal, (Obverse and Reverse) t ... ... Facing p. 27 

Lodge Banner ... ... ... ... ... p. 196 

Jubilee Medal (Obverse) ... ... ... ... p. 276 

Do. do. (Reverse) ... ... ... ... p. 276 

Historian's Jewel ... ... ... ... p. 340 

Rt. Wor. Bro. K. R. Cama In Memoriam Tablet and 

Medallion ... ... ... ... ... p. 340 

Group of Members of the Lodge ... ... ... p. 346 



LIST OF PAST MASTERS OF THE LODGE. 

From 1843 to 1911. 

1843-46... Rt. Wor. Bro. Dr. James Burnes, K. H. 

1847 ., P. W. LeGeyt 

1848 ., H. B. Lynch 

1849 , Dr. James Burnes, K. H.' 

1850 H. Ban- 

1851 ., W. Blowers 

1852 ..... ' .. .. H."B. Lynch and M, Boyce 

1853 ... ,, .. ., P. W. LeGeyt 

1854 M. O'Mealy 

1855 ... W. S. Crawford 

1856-7 ... John Evans 

1857-9 Manockjee Cursetjee 

1860-61...,, Ardesir Jamsetjee Bhajeewalla 

1861-2 ... ., K. R. Cama 

1863 ... ,, ., ,, Merwanjee Maneckjee Settna 

1864 ... ., Nowrosjee Nanabhoy Framjee 

1865 ... ,. Dossabhoy R. Kolha 

1866 Cursetjee Jehangir Tarachand 1 

1S67 ... .. .. Rustomjee Cawasjee Bahadurjee 

1868-9 M. C. Murzban, C. I. E. Khan Bahadur 

1870 ... ., .. Jehangir Gustadjee 

1871 Jejibhoy Jehangir Lam and Jehangir 

Gustadjee 

1872 ... ., .. ,. Darasha R. Chichgar, Khan Bahadur 

1873 ... ., ., Sir Pherozeshaw M. Mehta K. C. I. E. 

1874 , Jamsetjee Dhunjfbhoy Wadia 

1875 , Dr. Rustomjee Jamsedjee Nadershaw 

1876 Darashaw D. Reporter 

1877 , Rustomjee Marwanjee Patell 

1878-9 ... .. Hormusjee Dadabhoy 

1880-2 , .. Hormusjee M. Chichgar 

1882 .... .. C. F. Khory. 

1883 ... ,. .. Nowrosjee Furdunji. C.I. E. 
1884-5 ... .- .. Rustam M. Chichgar 

1886 Maneck.shaw D. Doctor 

1887 .. Nanabhai R. Chichgar 



xxiv 

PAST MASTER contd. 

1888-9 ...Rt.- Wor. Bro. Sir Munchershaw M. Bhownagree, R.C.I.E. 

1890 ... .< - Kaikhoshru N. Kabrajee 

1891-2 ... ., Dr. Temuljee B. Nariman, K.I.H. 

1893 ... .. Rustom K.R. Cama 

1894 ... Framjee D. Petit 

1895 ... ,, ., Maneckshaw J. Talyarkhan . 
1893 ... ,. Fazulbhoy Visram, C.I.E. 
1897 ... Pestonji M. Kanga 
1898-9...,, Phiroze C. Sethna 

1900 ... ., Sir Dinshaw M. Petit, Bart. 

1901 ... -, - Dr. Framji J. Patel 

1902 .., Pherozeshaw N. Pleader 

1903 ... Cursetjee H. Captain 

1904 ... Maneck R. Settna 

1905 ... Ardeshir F. Un walla 

1906 ... ., ., Dosabhoy F. Wadia 

1907 ... ., M Dr, Dosabhoy C. Sethna - 

1908 ... .. ., .. Kavasji B. Shroff 

1909 ... ., Dhunjibhoy R. Wadia* 

1910 ... .. .. Darasha Bazonji Mehta 

1911 ... ., Dr. Sorab C. Hormnsjee 



HISTORY OF 
LODGE RISING STAR 

OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 



Page 
vii 5 
xix 

47 

02 

09 
100 
100 
102 
108 

142 

144 



175 

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days it was rather difficult for members of the European 
community to know the qualifications and decide on the 
eligibility of natives to entrance in the Order. 

Therefore, while in England, Brother Maneckji Cur- 
setji was to be made a Mason under the auspices of the 



XXIV 

PAST MASTER contd. 

1888-9 ...Rt. Wor. Bro. Sir Munchershaw M. Bhownagree, K.C.I. E. 

1890 ... ., - - ; Kaikhoshru N. Kabrajee 

1891-2 ... > Dr. Temuljee B. Nariman, K.I.H. , 

1893 ... ., > Rustom K.R. Caraa 

1894 ... - * Frarajee D. Petit 

1895 ...., Maneckshaw J. Talyarkhan 
1893 ... " Fazulbhoy Visram, C.I.E. 



HISTORY OF 
LODGE RISING STAR 

OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 



CHAPTER I. 

LODGE Rising Star of Western India, No. 342, on the 
Register of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, was specially 
inaugurated and constructed for the admission of the 
natives of *India into the Masonic Craft. Its foundation 
was due to the late Right Worshipful Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji, who started a movement which, with his indo- 
mitable energy and praiseworthy and unflagging zeal, 
he ultimately succeeded in carrying out. Before he went 
to England, in the year 1841, it had been suggested to 
him by Right Worshipful Brother Dr. James Burnes, 
K H., Who was then the most distinguished Mason in 
Western India, and a coadjutor of his, Brother P. W. 
Le Geyt, that he should become a Mason, and he made 
an application to, and was proposed in, the old Lodge 
Perseverance, No- 546, but the members of that lodge 
who were then under the English banner objected to his 
admission, not on the ground of any personal disqualifi- 
cations or demerits, but solely because he was a native, 
and they argued that if they opened the portals of 
Masonry to one native, they would be obliged to open it 
to all, and would not know where to end and therefore 
demurred to his being admitted into the Craft. In those 
days it was rather difficult for members of the European 
community to know the qualifications and decide on the 
eligibility of natives to entrance in the Order. 

Therefore, while in England, Brother Maneckji Cur- 
setji was to be made a Mason under the auspices of the 



2 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Duke of Sussex, the uncle of Queen Victoria, who was 
then the Grand Master of England, and had received with 
favour the agitation for admitting natives, sometime 
previously carried on, but when he was there the Grand 
Master was on the Continent and when Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji left for the Continent the Grand Master return- 
ed to England. He was thus disappointed, but when he 
subsequently went to Paris he achieved his aim and was 
initiated in Lodge A. La Gloire de TUnivers, one of 
the first lodges in Paris which worked under the Warrant 
of Dispensation from his friend the Duke of Caze, the 
Most Venerable of the Grand Orient of France, and was 
therefore the first native gentleman of Western India 
who was admitted into our venerable Order and was 
necessarily the pioneer in the matter. 

To the spirit of French Masonry, therefore, the natives 
of India, owe the kindling and diffusion of Masonic 
Light. 

In the meantime a great change had taken place in 
Bombay. Brother Dr. Burnes, who had come out some 
six or seven years before this time with special powers 
from the then Grand Master of England, the Right 
Honourable James Lord Ramsay, to create Provincial 
Grand Lodges, 5ut upon the terms that they should be 
held under the Grand Lodge of Scotland, had just then, 
on the 10th December, 1842, constituted certain Masonic 
brethren of high position, who had previously belonged 
to the old lodge Perseverance, but had left it and were 
at the time unconnected with any Masonic lodge, into a 
new, namely, the present Lodge Perseverance, under 
the Scottish banner. 

After his return to Bombay, about the year 1843, 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji was asked to visit Lodge 
Perseverance and this he declined to do. He was then pro- 
posed as a joining member in that lodge, but on a ballot, 
which was taken on 3rd May, 1843, he was rejected. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 3 

Brother Philip William Le Geyt, who was then the 
Deputy Provincial Grand Master of Western India and a 
member of Lodge Perseverance and many other dis^- 
tin&uished Masons then, it is said, came to the resolution 
rather to resign the lodge, if Brother Maneckji Cursetji 
was not admitted, and to open a new lodge for the admit- 
tance of natives. The question was thereupon seriously 
discussed and the agitation assumed a definite shape. 

Several members of Lodge Perseverance, who were 
prominent Masons at the time, and other Masons who 
concurred in the views of Brother Maneckji Cursetji 
and the Deputy Provincial Grand Master of Western 
India con&idered that it was but just and advisable in 
the interests of the Craft that entrance into the Order 
should not be refused to native gentlemen of recognised 
respectability and character, and the happy idea was 
conceived of establishing a lodge specially for natives. 

The destinies of Freemasonry in India were still then 
In the hands of the very sympathetic and high-minded 
Dr. James Burnes, as Provincial Grand Master of Wes- 
tern India, and he cordially encouraged the idea. 

Under such favourable circumstances a requisition 
signed by twenty-seven leading Masons, most of whom 
were members of Lodge Perseverance, and dated the 
19th November, 1843, was then presented to the Provin- 
cial Grand Master of Western India praying that the 
signatories might be constituted by dispensation into a 
lodge ; that he, the Provincial Grand Master, should give 
it a name and constitute himself the Worshipful Master 
thereof, and nominate the first officers thereof and provide 
them with a formal charter. Two more names were then 
subsequently added to the requisition by direction of the 
Provincial Grand Master. Some of the requisitionists, 
who were members of Lodge Perseverance, were appre- 
hensive of an objection being raised by the Provincial 
Grand Master to the granting of the request on the ' 



4 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ground that the new lodge, if established, would inter- 
fere with that lodge, and in order to meet such objection 
they in anticipation declared by the requisition that they 
had no intention of withdrawing therefrom, and ple*dged 
themselves not to grant any degree in Masonry in the 
proposed lodge to any European except with his (the 
Provincial Grand Master's) special sanction. 

The pledge, however, was not agreed to by six of the 
brethren signing the requisition, as appears from the 
remarks made by them against their signatures. The 
requisition was as follows : 

Bombay, 19th November, 1843. 
To THE RIGHT WORSHIPFUL BROTHER 

JAMES BURNES, K.H., 

Provincial Grand Master of Western India. 
Right Worshipful and Dear Brother, 

We beg to represent to you that the time has, in our 
opinion, arrived when, for the credit of the Masonic 
Craft itself as well as in justice to some highly esteemed 
individuals, native gentlemen of -recognised respectability 
and character, such for instance as those who have been 
selected by the Government to sit on the bench of 
justices, or others who can be well and worthily recom- 
mended as possessing a fear of God, and a due sense of 
moral obligation should no longer be excluded from our 
lodges at this place. 

2. We are further of opinion that the admission of 
natives of the class we have mentioned at the present 
moment would give a decided impulse to the Craft at 
Bombay, which would be advantageous to every branch 
of it throughout India. 

3. But after the unwillingness which has been evinced 
in the Lodge Perseverance to the admission of natives, 
we conceive that the object we have in view could only 
be accomplished in a manner satisfactory to all parties 
by the establishment of a new lodge in Bombay. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 -S.C.- 5 

4. We therefore request that you wMl erect and con- 
stitute us by dispensation into a Lodge, giving a name to, 
and constituting yourself the Worshipful Master of the 
same, nominating the first officers thereof and also provid- 
ing us with a formal charter at your early convenience. 

5. The only objection to this proposal which we can 
anticipate on -your partis that it may interfere with the 
Lodge Perseverance, but those of us who are members 
of that Lodge have no intention of withdrawing from it, 
that we hereby declare our resolution to work in true 
brotherly love w r ith Perseverance. To show clearly, how- 
ever, our object and feeling we pledge ourselves, if the 
new lodgo is established, not to grant any degree of 
Masonry in it to any European whatever unless under 
your own special sanction. The arrangement, there- 
fore, so far from injuring Perseverance would in all 
probability materially benefit it by the spur it would 
give to Masonry generally in Western India. 

We are, 
Right Worshipful and Dear Brother, 

Your attache^: and faithful Brother, 
P. W. Le Geyt, P. M. | Edward F. Danvers, 

( My only doubt is whether we are justified in giving the pledge contained 
in para. 5.) 



W. A. Purnell. 
George Buist. 
W. Simson. 



W. Wellis. 
H. Gibb. 
R. Brown. 



James Boyd, P. M. and G. P. S. B. 

H. Barr. ( But I object to the pledge contained in para. 5.) 



A. Forster, R. A. and P. M. 
H. Fawcett. 
D. Davidson. 
Gregor Grant. 
Spencer Compton. 
( Saving the pledge.) 



George Rowley. 

( Saving the pledge.) 

A. Larkworthy, 
A. S. Unwin. 
J. F. Morrier. 
Maneckji Cursetji. 



M. Willoughby. 
W. W. Cargill. ( Subscribe to all except para. 5.) 
H. G. Gordon. | John Mullaby. 

J. C. Ibbs. (But disagree to the pledge.) 
R. H. Davidson. I W. Blowers. 

G. Munbee. I G. Kingstone. 



6 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The names of Brothers Blowers and Kingstone were 
added by direction of the Right Worshipful Provincial 
Grand Master. 

The signatories to the requisition, besides being Mstsens.- 
of high standing and repute, were men occupying im- 
portant and responsible positions and offices under 
Government and otherwise. Three of them, namely Bro- 
thers Le Geyt, Simson and Grant, were members of the 
Civil Service of the Honourable East India Company. 
Ten belonged to the Honourable East India Company's 
Military Service; namely, Brothers Wellis, Barr, Forster, 
D. Davidson, Unwin, Willoughby, Mullaby, Munbee, 
Rowley and Kingstone. One belonged to the Indian Navy, 
namely, Brother Fobs. Five belonged to the Medical 
Service, namely, Brothers Boyd, Purnell, Gibb, Brown and 
Morrier. Two belonged to the judiciary, namely, Brothers 
Spencer Compton and Danvers, who were magistrates* 
and of the remaining brethren Brother Maneckji Cur set ji 
was an Assistant Collector, and Brother W. Blowers was 
Deputy Postmaster General, Brother Larkworthy was a 
M.D., Brother Buist was an LL.D. and the Editor of the 
Bombay Times, Brother Cargill was the Managing Direc- 
tor of the Bank of Western India, and Brothers Fawcett 
and Gordon were merchants. As to Brother R. H. 
Davidson it does not appear to what service, profession 
or trade he belonged. 

It will thus be seen how influential and representative 
a body the requisitionists formed. 

A reply was sent to their requisition by Right Worship- 
ful Brother Dr. Burnes on 1st December, 1843, and it is 
impossible not to be struck with the high character and 
lofty mind of its writer, or to be indelibly impressed with 
the pronouncement of Masonic principles and privileges 
therein contained. To notice briefly or even to give a 
short summary of, or scattered extracts from, that reply 
would be doing the greatest injustice to that 'noble Mason 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 7 

whose correct estimate of staunch fidelity to the princi- 
ples of our most venerable institution and whose cordial 
sympathy with the movement which during the last 
shtf^-six years has justified itself, gave the natives of 
India a lodge which for years past has, according to 
independent testimony, been holding a most prominent 
position in Scottish Freemasonry. 

This reply is an important document, and in itself a 
strong and stable landmark and a faithful guide. It was 
as follows : 
To 

THE RIGHT WORSHIPFUL BROTHER P.W. LE GEYT, 
Deputy Provincial Grand Master of Western India, 

Bombay. 
Right Worshipful and Dear Brother, 

I have been favoured with an address signed by you 
and twenty-six other worthy brethren pointing out the 
injustice as well as the inexpediency of longer continu- 
ing to debar from Masonic privileges native gentlemen 
who are of acknowledged respectability and character 
holding responsible offices under Government, and who 
can be well and worthily recommended by brethren 
as possessing a fear of God and a due sense of moral 
obligation, and for reasons therein clearly stated request- 
ing my warrant and authority for the establishment of a 
new lodge into which they may be received and of which 
you desire me to accept the chair and to nominate the 
other office bearers. 

Secondly, To such a proposition emanating, Right 
Worshipful Brother, from yourself and supported by so 
many other eminent brethren, I feel that I have but one 
reply to offer, namely that I am ready to give effect to 
your wish, and to further to the utmost of my ability the 
object you have in view- You and the other brethren 
who have signed the requisition have, I doubt not, 
seriously considered the probable result of so important 



8 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

a proceeding and the solemn responsibility which must 
attach to the members of such a lodge as you 
contemplate to establish, which in consenting: to reward 
a few of the natives most distinguished for hoWur 
and probity by admission to Ma'sonic privileges, must 
likewise be prepared vigorously to resist the influx of 
many who may be urgent to participate in, but whom 
it may be necessary to exclude from, our venerable 
institution. 

Thirdly. Although I have never contemplated anything 
approaching to the free admission of natives into the 
Craft, I have long looked forward to the time when in 
the spread of civilization and to aid its progress it would 
be becoming or rather imperative on us, as enlightened 
men and Masons, to throw our portals open to particular 
individuals, and I know no class from amongst whom a 
selection for this purpose may with greater propriety be 
made than the highly respectable, intelligent and enter- 
prising community of Bombay ; nor, I may be allowed to 
add, any body of European brethren to whom the choice 
of the native gentlemen to be so honoured may be more 
safely entrusted than to yourself, and those who are 
associated with you in the present requisition. 

Fourthly. With these views of the subject, I have 
desired the Provincial Grand Secretary to prepare at 
once a dispensation authorizing yourself and the various 
other brethren who have signed the application to con- 
stitute yourselves into a new lodge which under the 
peculiar circumstances of its establishment will be 
designated "The Rising Star of Western India," and 
for which a regular charter will be obtained without 
delay, agreeable to your request. 

Fifthly. On an occasion like the present it would not 
become me to shrink from responsibility, and I conse- 
quently, on the same principle that I accepted the chair 
of Perseverance at n. former time of emergency, now 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 9 

accept the honour which you tender me of the master- 
ship of the new lodge requesting that you, Right 
Worshipful Brother, will personally aid me by officiating 
as Past Master. 

Sixthly. You do me but justice in anticipating that 
no agreement would be satisfactory to me by which 
injury would be inflicted on the Lodge Perseverance, 
to the members of which the Craft generally of India, 
and myself personally, owe a deep debt of gratitude, 
but far from believing that the establishment of the 
new lodge will injure Perseverance, I concur in the 
opinion expressed in your application that it will give an 
impulse to^chat lodge ; and that such is also the conscien- 
tious belief of some of those the most interested and best 
able to judge, is evident from the names of many of the 
most prominent and zealous members of Perseverance 
being attached to your requisition. 

Seventhly- This fact, as well as the circumstance of 
my taking the chair of the new lodge, will, I trust, be an 
earnest to Perseverance that the resolution is to work in 
brotherly love and kindness towards her ; but to remove 
all doubt on this point I now, in availing myself of the 
privilege you have given me of nominating the officers, 
beg to appoint the present Worshipful Master of Per- 
severance, Brother A, Larkworthy, and the present Junior 
Warden, Brother Spencer Compton, to be respectively 
the Senior Warden and Senior Deacon of the new lodge, 
and Brother James Boyd, Past Senior Warden of Per- 
severance, and Brother W. Wellis, Past Senior Deacon 
of the same, to be respectively the Treasurer and Junior 
Deacon of the same. To the vacant appointments of 
Junior Warden and Secretary I also nominate Brothers 
Henry Fawcett and Maneckji Cursetji, the former being 
well entitled to office from his z?eal and the latter being 
likely to prove highly useful as Secretary to the new 
lodge. 



10 HISTORY* OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Eighthly. These arrangements will, I conceive, so 
completely blend the interests of Perseverance and 
Rising Star of Western India together that I would 
submit to the latter the propriety of reconsiderihg, at 
its first meeting the pledge you have given in the 5th 
para, of your requisition which appears to be unsatis- 
factory to some of the brethren who have signed the 
paper and the object of which may probably be obtained 
by some other arrangement satisfactory to both lodges. 

Ninthly. In conclusion, I would suggest that a code of 
bye-laws defining clearly the rules under which native 
gentlemen can be received into the new lodge, should be 
immediately established not only requiring the strictest 
and most deliberate scrutiny into the character of all 
candidates but imposing such restrictions as may be 
deemed requisite to guard the interest and honour of 
the Craft. 

Tenthly Praying earnestly, Right Worshipful and 
Dear Brother, that the Grand Architect of the Universe 
may prosper you, and all other brethren associated with 
you on the present occasion in this and all other laudable 
undertakings, 

I beg to subscribe myself, 
Affectionately and fraternally yours, 

JAMES BURNES, 

P. G. Master of Western India. 
Bombay, 1st December, 1843. 

A copy of this communication has been transmitted to 
the Worshipful Master of the Lodge Perseverance for 
its information. 

SPENCER COMPTON, 

P.P.G.S. 



CHAPTER II. 



THE establishment of the Lodge was hailed with feel- 
ings of brotherly love by lodge Perseverance, for at a 
meeting held by them on 1st December, 1843, a letter from 
the Provincial Grand Secretary to them intimating the 
grant of the dispensation to the lodge was read and a 
resolution was passed by them allowing the lodge to meet 
in their rooms. 

On the llth December, 1843, a circular was issued over 
the signature of Brother Compton, Past Provincial Grand 
Secretary, to the brethren who had signed the requisition 
inviting them to meet the Provincial Grand Master at 
the Town Hall, on the 15th December, 1843, in order 
that they might be duly constituted into a lodge to 
be designated "The Lodge Rising Star of Western 
India " and intimating that at that meeting it would be 
submitted that the bye=laws of Lodge Perseverance (a 
copy of which was therewith circulated) should be im- 
mediately adopted for the government of the new lodge 
except certain clauses thereof particularly mentioned, as 
to which the circular stated certain modifications (also 
set out therein) would be submitted. 

A meeting was accordingly held at, the Town Hall, on 
I5tih December, 1843, at which there were present the 
Provincial Grand Master of Western India, the Deputy 
Provincial Grand Master o'f Western India, and Brothers 
Compton, Simson, D. Davidson, Maneckji Cursetji, 
Barr, Larkworthy, Morrier, and Boyd. The requisition 
to the Provincial Grand Master and the reply thereto, 
as also the circular convening the meeting and the 



12 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

warrant prepared for the lodge, were read and then the 
Provincial Grand Master declared the brethren present 
to be a lawfully constituted Lodge of Freemasons to 
work under the Warrant and to be designated l4<< The 
Lodge Rising Star of Western India. " The Warrant, as 
is stated therein, was granted by the Provincial Grand 
Master by virtue of the powers vested in him by a 
Patent (an attested copy whereof was, it is also stated 
therein, furnished to the brethren) and authorized the 
brethren to carry on in the lodge the work of the 
three degrees of St. John or Craft Masonry, agreeably 
to the rules and usages of our ancient Order. It was 
signed and sealed by the Provincial Grand Master and is 
dated 15th December, 1843, A. D., and of Masonry 5843. 
This Warrant is the birthright of the lodge and a full 
copy of it is as follows : 

PROVINCIAL GRAND LODGE OF WESTERN 

INDIA. 

To all free and faithful brethren in the Craft Greeting. 
Whereas a representation has been made by the following 
brethren, viz., P. W. Le Geyt, E. F. Danvers, W. A. Purnell, 
G. Buist, W. Simson, James Boyd, W. Wellis, H. Gibb, 
R. Brown, H. J. Barr, A. Forster, H. Fawcett, D. David- 
son, Gregor Grant, Spencer Compton, A. Larkworthy, 
J. S. Unwin, J. F. Morrier, Maneckji Cursetji, M. 
Willoughby, W. W. Cargill, H. G. Gordon, John Mullaby, 
J. C. Ibbs, G. B. Munbee, R. H. Davidson, and George 
Rowley, all of whom are known to me as true and faith- 
ful members of the Masonic Fraternity, and residents 
of Bombay, that having the prosperity of Masonry at 
heart, -and the desire to promote and diffuse its genuine 
principles they are solicitous of being formed into a 
Lodge of Freemasons at Bombay, and required my con- 
sent and authority to that effect. Be it known, therefore, 
that I having full and perfect confidence in the said 
brethren, do, in virtue of the powers vested in me by a 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342.S.C. IS 

Patent (an attested copy of which has been furnished to 
the said brethren) hereby constitute, erect and appoint 
them a lawful Lodge of Freemasons to be held at Bom- 
bay., dnder the designation and style of ''Lodge Rising 
Star of Western India " to carry on therein the work of 
the three degrees of St. John's or Craft Masonry agree- 
ably to the rules and usages of our ancient Order, and I 
do further, in compliance with the urgent request of the 
said brethren, assume the office of the first Worshipful 
Master thereof and nominate and appoint the under- 
mentioned brethren to be the other officers of the said 
Lodge Rising Star of Western India until St. John's Day, 
27th Deceniber 1844, namely : 

P.W. LeGeyt Past Master. 

A. Larkworthy Senior Warden. 

H. Fawcett Junior Warden. 

Spencer Compton Senior Deacon. 

W. Wellis Junior Deacon. 

Maneckji Cursetji Secretary. 

James Boyd Treasurer. 

In witness whereof I have appended my hand and 
seal at Bombay this 15th day of December in the year 
of our Lord 1843, and of Masonry 5843 in the presence 
of the brethren whose signatures are hereto attached. 

James Burnes Provincial Grand Mas- 

ter of Western India. 

Spencer Compton Past Provincial Grand 

Secretary. 

W. A. Purnell Past Provincial Grand 

Senior Deacon and 
Pro vincial G r a n d 
Marshal. 

John Mullaby Past Provincial Grand 

Registrar. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji had, it appears, undertaken 
with the Provincial Grand Master and his deputy that he 



14 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

would see that none but the most worthy natives of the 
class for whose reception the lodge was founded would 
be admitted into its portals, and the records of the lodge 
show how thoroughly he acquitted himself of * that 
responsibility to the best of his knowledge, power and 
ability. 

The Provincial Grand Master assumed the office of the 
first Worshipful Master of the Lodge and appointed as 
his first office bearers the brethren whose names with their 
respective offices appear set out in the Warrant. At this 
meeting three resolutions were unanimously passed, viz: 
( I ) That Brothers Blowers and Kingstone, whose names 
were attached to the said requisition after the dispensa- 
tion warrant had been prepared, be held to be the original 
members of the Lodge ; ( II ) that the then existing bye- 
law^ of Lodge Perseverance with certain exceptions, viz-, 
clauses 1, 22 and 23 should guide the lodge until the 
.St. John's Day, 24th June, 1844 ; and (III) that no 
member should be required to subscribe monthly to the 
lodge who paid a monthly subscription to the Provincial 
{Jrand Lodge of Western India or the Lodge Persever- 
ance of Bombay. 

The excepted clauses of the bye-laws of Lodge Persever- 
ance related to the holding of regular meetings, the 
interval between each degree and the fees, and in regard 
to those matters it was provided that the regular meet- 
ings should be held six times a year, namely, on the 15th 
of January, March, May, July, September, and November, 
and if the 15th should fall on a Sunday, then on the 14th 
of the same month, that the interval between each degree 
should be three months, instead of one month, and that 
the fees should be Rupees two hundred for initiation, 
Rupees forty for the second degree, Rupees sixty for 
the third degree, and Rupees fifty for joining. The 
corresponding fees except for the second degree in Lodge 
Perseverance were much less. They were Rupees seven- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 15 

ty-five for initiation, Rupees forty for raising, and 
Rupees five for joining. The fee for passing in Lodge 
Perseverance was also Rupees forty. 

" Rising Stiar " was thus the second lodge established 
in Bombay under the Scottish banner (the first being 
Perseverance) and the third in the whole of Western 
India, the first being Lodge Hope of Karachi No. 337 S.C. 
founded by the famous conqueror of Scinde, Lieutenant 
General Sir Charles Napier, under a Warrant from Bro- 
ther Dr. Burnes in the year 1842, and the second being 
Perseverance. 

It was at the very meeting held at the Town Hall on 
15th December, 1843, that four gentlemen were proposed 
for initiation to be bal lotted for at the next meeting. 
They were Mr. Ardeshir Cursetji Wadia (the first native 
gentleman admitted a Fellow of the Royal Society, who 
had a great Engineering reputation and was at this time 
Chief Engineer in the Government Dockyard) and Messrs. 
Mirza Ali Mahomed Shoostry, Hajee Hasham Ishphanee 
and Mahomed Jaffer, who were leading Mogul Mahomedan 
merchants of the day. 

The meeting was adjourned to the 15th January, 1844. 
It will be noticed that only six office-bearers were ap- 
pointed, namely, the two Wardens, two Deacons, Secretary 
and Treasurer. No appointments were made of an 
Inner Guard or Tyler or to any other office. 

The historian of the Craft, Brother Dr. George Oliver, 
gave a short account of the inception of the lodge in his 
Freemason's Quarterly Review of 1844, at pages 108-9 
which began thus : " Bombay The spell is broken. The 
'" Masonic sleepers are entranced, energy again prevails, 
" and the Rising Star of Western India promises light 
" and lustre to all within its circle embracing within its 
" ample folds the citizen of the world and the native 
" gentleman born under the Orient Sun/' and it ended 
with a pregnant sentence full of deep sympathy and en- 



16 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

couragement. "May the foundation stone prove the 
" superstructure of a building that shall endure for all 
ages." 

This last sentence afforded to an equally noble minded 
brother the theme for a letter which he addressed then 
to the Editor of the Masonic Quarterly Review under the 
nom-de-plume of Frater, and was published at pages 365- 
67 of the Review, for 1844, and will appear in extenso a 
little later. 

During the year 1844, six regular meetings and two 
special meetings of the lodge (of which one was the first 
anniversary meeting) were held, and at all of them with 
the exception of one meeting the Right JVorshipful 
Master presided. All the meetings were convened by 
circulars which are set out in the minute book and were 
held in the " Lodge House " behind the Police Office in 
Mazagon, and the number of members who attended 
them was between twelve and twenty and at every meet- 
ing there were some visiting brethren. The degree work 
during the^year consisted of eight initiations, five pass- 
ings and three raisings. 

The first regular meeting was held on the 22nd (and 
not 15th) January 1844, owing to the lodge rooms not 
being ready, and at that meeting after a " prayer and 
an address " from the Right Worshipful Master and 
p confirmation of the proceedings of the last meeting a 
declaration prepared for the natives of India to be sub- 
scribed previous to their being initiated in the Craft was 
approved of and thereafter Brothers Mirza Ali Maho- 
med Shoostry and Ardeshir Cur set ji Wadia subscribed to 
the declaration and were ballotted for, duly elected and 
initiated and the Senior Warden delivered an address to 
them after the ceremony. There is no minute made of 
the prayer and address of the Right Worshipful Master, 
but obviously they must have been said and delivered as 
being appropriate to the holding of the very first regu- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 31>2 S.C. 17 

lar meeting of the lodge. A brother named Samuel 
Chetham (a member of Lodge Perseverance) was duly 
elected Tyler of the lodge and the lodge was adjourned 
to the 15th March next. The declaration as approved 
was in the same terms as the form annexed as Appendix 
A to the existing bye-laws of the lodge, except that it 
contained the words "the only one true and living God" 
instead of "the only one true God" and did not 
contain any statement as to the candidate's profession 
and residence and declarations that he had never -before 
applied to any lodge for initiation and that he would 
conform to the bye-laws of this lodge, which statement 
..and declarations are now required. It differed from 
the usual declaration then adopted in that it commenced 
^vith " I . . . . in the fear and belief of the only one 
true and living God and of a state of reward and 
punishment after life for deeds done in the flesh and 
of the nature and import of a solemn obligation.'' The 
departure seems to have been devised as a check 
and a safeguard against the dangers of an indiscri- 
minate admission of natives into the Order and into its 
secrets. 

The second regular meeting was held on the appointed 
day, namely, 15th March, 1844. Messrs. Mahomed Jaffer 
and Hajee Hasham Ishphanee were initiated after they 
had subscribed to the declaration and had taken the 
necessary obligation. These two brethren must have been 
ballotted for and duly elected at the last meeting though 
the minutes thereof are silent on the point. Four candi- 
dates (all again Persian Moguls) were duly proposed for 
ballot at the next meeting, namely, Syed Hady bin Syed 
Mahomed Tukee, Mirza Mahomed Reza, Haji Mahomed 
Mehdi and Mirza Ahmed. 

The Right Worshipful Master announced at this 
meeting that he had ordered out from England a 
complete set of jewels and aprons for the use of the 

2 



18 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

lodge and thereupon the brethren passed a resolution 
thanking him for the trouble he had taken and ordering 
the Treasurer to pay for the whole set. A visiting; 
brother named Brother M. O'Meally officiated as Irtner 
Guard at this meeting. The lodge was closed and 
ordered to meet again on the 15th May next unless called 
by reasons of emergency. 

The next meeting, however, was not held on the 
15th May " in consequence of the excessive heat of the 
weather" but was held on 15th June 1844. The four 
candidates proposed at the last meeting were all 
ballotted for, severally introduced and regularly ini- 
tiated, after which an address was delivered by 
the Right Worshipful Master followed by a suitable 
explanation of the working tools and tracing board by 
the Senior Warden, Worshipful Brother Larkworthy. 

It was unusual to invest any member of the lodge who 
was not a Master Mason with the badge of any office, yet 
the Right Worshipful Master invested at this meeting 
Brothers Ardeshir Cursetji Wadia, Mirza Alii Mahomed 
Shoostry and Mahomed Jaffer though they were entered 
apprentices only witfh the jewels of the Senior Deacon, 
Inner Guard and Director of Ceremonies, respectively, to- 
officiate as such in the absence of the brethren holding 
those offices, remarking that he had made an exception 
in their favour in the belief that it would emulate 
them to advance the cause of Freemasonry, and as a 
matter of fact Brother Mahomed Jaffer officiated as 
Inner Guard at this very meeting. By this time therefore 
it will be seen appointments to the necessary offices were 
completed. 

As the bye-laws of the lodge, as resolved at the meet- 
ing of 15th December, 1843, were to be in force until 
24th June, 1844, the brethren resolved at this meeting 
to extend them till 27th December, 1844, which was the 
then ensuing St. John's Day. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 19 

The fourth regular meeting took place on 15th July, 
1844, and was the only meeting during the year which 
the Right Worshipful Master did not attend, and was 
presided over by Worshipful Brother Larkworthy. 

Brothers Ardeshir Cursetji Wadia, Mirza Alii Mahom- 
ed Shoostry and Mahomed Jaff er were duly passed to the 
respectable degree of Fellow Craft Masons, and the 
working tools and the tracing board were then explained 
to the newly passed brethren by the officiating Worship- 
ful Master, It was the practice in those days that a 
candidate before being advanced at a meeting had to be 
formally proposed at a previous meeting for being 
Crafted or 'raised, and this practice continued till the 
year 1891. 

At the fifth regular meeting, held on 10th September, 
1844, it was resolved to order out from England the 
whole of Brother Dr. George Oliver's works on Masonry, 
and two gentlemen were proposed for initiation, viz., 
Meer Hyder, a respectable Persian merchant from Cal- 
cutta, and Nabob Akbar Alikhan. Brother Oliver's works 
subsequently arrived and some of them still form a part 
of the library of the lodge. 

The last regular meeting was to have been held on 
15th November, 1844, but in order to enable the brethren 
to meet Brother Fawcett, Junior Warden, (who was then 
shortly leaving for Europe and was anxious to attend the 
meeting to bid farewell to the brethren) it was held in defer- 
ence to a request from him and Brother Le Geyt on 19th 
November. The lodge passed a resolution unanimously 
recording the regret which it felt at the departure of 
Brother Fawcett, and thanking him for his services as 
one of its office bearers ; and the Right Worshipful Master 
conveyed the resolution to Brother Fawcett in a compli- 
mentary speech. 

The first anniversary meeting of the lodge was held 
on 16th December, 1844, and as it turned out was as 



20 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

memorable as the one held on 15th December, 1843, at 
which the lodge was brought into existence. 

The Right Worshipful Master and Bros. Lt peyt, 
P. M., and Larkworthy, S. W., had so very much endeared 
themselves to the native brethren of the lodge ( the first 
named for founding and conducting the lodge and the 
second for his efforts for the establishment of the lodge 
and the last named for his eloquent expositions of the 
ceremonies and principles of Freemasonry), that they 
held a meeting of their own on 12th December, 1844, 
under the Chairmanship of Brother Maneckji Cursetji, 
and unanimously resolved thereat to commemorate the 
foundation of the lodge by striking a medal bearing on 
one side the effigy of the Founder and on the other a 
suitable inscription indicative of the object, and to 
present the medal in gold to the Right Worshipful Master 
and in silver to Brothers Le Geyt and Larkworthy and 
other distinguished Masons, and appointed Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji to present the resolutions engrossed 
on vellum to Right Worshipful Brother Dr. Burnes with 
a request to consent to accept the same. 

The resolutions under the circumstances of the case 
were but quite natural for the native brethren to have 
passed, and indeed they could not have done better than 
to approach the Founder of the lodge in the manner 
they did. It is not possible to cut out any portions 
from the resolutions, and to attempt to do so would 
be to withold from it the expression so eloquent and 
grateful which the native brethren thereby gave to 
their sincere and cordial feelings which when read 
cannot fail to inspire any reader with true Masonic 
feelings and the deepest reverence for the Craft 
and its supporters. The resolution, therefore, will be 
found set out in extenso a little later as part of the 
proceedings of the anniversary meeting of 16th Decem- 
ber, 1844, together with the very splendid address which 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3^2 S.C. 21 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji delivered after reading 
the resolutions to the European brethren of the 
lodge. That address consists of two sentences but of 
forty-jseven lines as written in the minute book of 
the lodge and reveals in unmistakable terms the 
genuine character and the conviction of an universal 
brotherhood. 

The Right Worshipful Master was at the anniversary 
meeting solicited by the native brethren to continue in 
office for the ensuing year, and their proposal having been 
supported by the other brethren and carried by accla- 
mation the Right Worshipful Master accepted the office 
but on condition (which the brethren accepted) that 
Brother Larkworthy should be appointed Substitute 
Master with full authority to rule the lodge in his 
absence, or even in his presence should he deem it 
advisable, and Brother Larkworthy accepted the office. 

The Right Worshipful Master, Substitute Master and 
Treasurer were then duly elected by ballot and the Right 
Worshipful Master nominated his office-bearers for the 
ensuing year amongst whom was Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji again appointed as Secretary to be invested on 
St. John's Day, 27th December, 1844. 

The following nine European brethren were then affili- 
ated to the lodge and as a special case (the meeting 
being the first anniversary meeting) they were all 
unanimously admitted as Original Members of the lodge 
without payment of the joining fee, viz : 

Brother W. Crawford Brother J. Bird 
W. Ward G. Jenkins 

C. F. Stewart D. Graham 

W. Pole H. B. Lynch 

E. Downes 

and out of them Brother Pole was appointed Senior Dea- 
con and Brother Lynch was appointed Interpreter and 
Director of Ceremonies. 



22 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Brothers Syed Tukee and Reza were duly passed, and 
a very pleasing and important function then took place. 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji stepped forward ( and 
addressed the Right Worshipful Master in nearly ttiese 
words : 

Right Worshipful and Esteemed Brother 

"At a meeting of the native members of the Lodge 
'Rising Star of Western India' held on the 12th instant, 
it was unanimously resolved to commemorate its founda- 
tion and at the same time to mark their sense of 
gratitude to you, Right Worshipful, as its Founder, by 
striking a medal bearing on one side your effigy and on 
the other a suitable inscription indicative of the object, 
and that I have been commissioned to read the said 
resolutions to you, which I beg to be permitted to do in 
the presence of this assembly. 

" I need scarcely assure you, Right Worshipful, that 
however gratifying to my feelings the performance of 
the task thus entrusted to me, I fear my inability to do 
full justice to the very earnest feelings of respect, 
friendship and regard, which I am requested to represent 
to your Worship, and in which I do most cordia'lly 
participate. 

"That your Worship's attachment to the cause of Free- 
masonry, your zeal for the advancement of its prosperity, 
and the very many most valuable services which you 
have rendered to the Craft are too well known to need 
recapitulation, whilst your worth and merits have been 
appreciated and acknowledged by various bodies of the 
fraternity in India and Europe, but that this additional 
act of yours, in throwing boldly and undisguisedly open 
the portals of Freemasonry to the natives of India, and 
which it is the object of these resolutions to com- 
memorate, will, to use the Oriental expression, render 
your name resplendent throughout the East, and ever 
endear you to your native brethren. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 23 

"To these observations I need add nothing further than 
the devoutest prayer of your native brethren for your 
liealtji and prosperity, and their request that you will 
kindly give your sanction to the resolutions which I 
would now read, and in which the native brethren hope 
they will be supported by the European members of the 
lodge." 

The resolution then read by Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji was as follows: 

" At a meeting of the native members of the Lodge 
Rising Star of Western India, held at the residence of 
Brother Aga Mahomed Jaffer, on the 12th instant, the 
following resolutions were duly and unanimously passed. 
"Firstly. That the 15th instant being the anniversary of 
the establishment of our lodge, under Warrant from our 
Right Worshipful Brother James Burnes, K. H., F. R. S., 
tc., Provincial Grand Master of Western India, the 
occasion seems appropriate for our marking in some 
especial manner our gratitude for his having thrown 
'Open the Craft to us, and for commemorating the founda- 
tion of Lodge Rising Star of Western India. 

"Secondly That this shall be done by striking a 
medal bearing on one side the effigy of our said beloved 
Brother, the Provincial Grand Master, the Founder of our 
lodge, and on the other a suitable inscription com- 
memorative of its erection expressly for the reception 
of native gentlemen. 

"Thirdly. That one of the medals be in gold, and be 
presented to our said Brother, the Provincial Grand 
Master, with a suitable inscription round its edge, and 
that he be solicited to wear it on all occasions of 
Masonic ceremony, as a token of the love, respect and 
gratitude entertained towards him by his native breth- 
ren of the Lodge Rising Star of Western India. 

" Fourthly. That the rest of the medals be in silver, 
-and with the permission of the lodge and, under the 



24 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

sanction of the Provincial Grand Master, be established 
henceforth as the badge of the Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India, to be worn by every member thereof, 
pendant to an orange-watered rib-bon, and that for tfiis 
purpose the lodge be requested to accept from us the 
dyes. 

"Fifthly. That of the said medals in silver one be- 
presented to our Right Worshipful and dear Brother 
Le Geyt, the Deputy Provincial Grand Master and our 
Past Master, and one to our Worshipful and esteemed 
Brother Larkworthy, our Senior Warden, to the former 
in token of our appreciation of his efforts for the 
establishment of our lodge, and to the latter iii token of 
the eloquent expositions of the principles and ceremonies 
of Freemasonry which he, at various times, has favoured 
us with. 

"Sixthly. That steps, likewise, be taken to transmit 
the said medals respectively to the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Masters of England, Scotland, and Ireland, the 
Duke de Gaze, Most Venerable of the Grand Orient of 
France, their Royal Highnesses the Grand Masters of 
the Order in Holland and Prussia, the Right Worshipful 
Brother J. Grant, Provincial Grand Master of Bengal, 
and to the Most Noble the Provincial Grand Master of 
Madras and the three Princes of the Blood Royal of 
Persia, who are Freemasons, and to such other exalted 
brethren as the lodge may hereafter specify. 

"Seventhly. Thai Brothers Maneckji Cursetji Moha- 
med Jaffer, Ardeshir Cursetji, and Alii Mahomed, 
Esquires, do form themselves into a committee for the 
purpose of giving effect to the object we have in view, in 
a manner creditable to us and agreeable to the Provincial 
Grand Master. 

"Eighthly. That these resolutions be fairly engrossed 
on vellum both in the English and Persian languages and 
be presented to our Right Worshipful Provincial Grand 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 25 

Master, at the meeting of our lodge on the 16th instant, 
with a solicitation that he will oblige us by consenting 
and giving effect to the same. 

' " MANECKJI CURSETJI, 

Chairman of the said Meeting." 

The Right Worshipful brother then addressed the 
native brethren in Persian and afterwards addressed 
the other brethren as follows: 

" My Brethren, I have just endeavoured to explain to 
our native brethren in the Persian language that I 
must indeed be wanting in feelings which should 
characterise a man and a Mason, if I did not deeply value 
the friendship and brotherly love which have induced 
them to identify me with the measure now proposed, 
but that highly as I appreciate the distinction to myself 
conveyed in it, which is indeed most flattering and grate- 
ful, yet the proposal comes recommended to me on 
grounds altogether apart from personal feelings and 
finds a cordial and unqualified welcome to my heart, 
chiefly from its exhibiting on their part so becoming a 
reverence and homage to our Masonic Craft, and thus I 
have observed, instead of being a restricted compliment 
to an individual, already far over-rewarded for any 
services he may have performed, it assumes an extended 
form and object, which while they confer on those from 
whom it emanates infinite credit and honour, clothe it 
with a value which will render it precious and acceptable 
to the Masonic brethren of every tongue and nation 
throughout the earth ; since it goes forth to the world as 
a noble proof that the elite and selected of the native 
gentlemen of Bombay, having been admitted into our 
Brotherhood and understood its tenets and purposes, 
have marked their gratitude and exultation by a 
testimonial altogether unprecedented in the East, but 
which, after exciting a widely spread and intense interest 
in our own day and generation, will survive and endure 



26 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

as a lasting token of their Masonic zeal and, fidelity to 
mankind hereafter, especially endearing them to those 
who shall succeed to our emblems and symbols long a,fter 
we shall have been initiated, passed, raised, and it is c to 
be hoped exalted on another lodge. Under this view of 
the subject I have added that it does not become me to 
interpose personal scruples or delicacy to the execution 
of a measure and duty highly complimentary certainly 
to myself, but which may materially advance the inter- 
est of Masonry in India, and which, ; while it confers a 
high distinction on the Lodge Rising Star of Western 
India, will ever reflect lustre and honour on the nine 
first native members received into it.*' 

No finer or more eloquent tribute than this speech could 
have been paid to the labours of the worthy Founder of 
the lodge, and no more touching proof of the love and 
regard he had inspired could have been given than the 
depth and sincerity of gratitude which found such 
genuine and spontaneous expression. 

The following resolution was then proposed by Bm- 
ther Blowers, seconded by Brother Compton, and carried 
unanimously: 

"That the lodge do cordially hail the resolutions 
submitted by Brother Maneckji Cursetji and the other 
native brethren ; receive with gratitude the medal dyes, 
and, with the sanction of the Provincial Grand Master, do 
establish the medal as the badge in manner proposed by 
the native brethren. 

"That a committee to be nominated by the Right 
Worhipf ul Master be appointed to co-operate with the 
committee of the native brethren, to assist them by 
every means in their power in the object they have in 
view/' 

This resolution shows how whole-hearted and sympa- 
thetic was the union between the European and Native 
members of the lodge. 




Burne'o Medal Obverse 




Burne's Medal Reverse 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 27 

In pursuance of it Brothers Blowers, Barr, Compton, 
and Dr. Buist were appointed by the lodge^to join with 
the native committee. 

Ifc was under these circumstances that a medal was 
'decided upon as a badge of the lodge. It has since been 
called "The Burnes Medal" or the "Founder's Medal" 
or the " Fundator's Medal." It was struck in due course 
and duly arrived from London where it was executed in 
'the year 1846 by the famous artist K. Wyon, and was 
-worn by the members of the lodge for the first time at 
the lodge meeting of 15th June, 1846. On the obverse 
:side it bears a bust effigy of Right Worshipful Brother 
Dr. Burnos surrounded by the inscription " Frat Insig 
et dilecl Jacobus Burnes fundator" meaning "James 
Burnes, Founder, distinguished and beloved brother." On 
the reverse are the full size effigies of Brothers Maneckji 
Cursetji and Mahomed Jaffer each clothed in the full dress 
of his community and with an apron and a ribbon of the 
Order and wearing the jewel of his office and bearing a 
banner in his hand and both standing near a pedestal on 
which are placed two volumes of the Sacred Law and a 
jewel, and at foot and in front of which are the working 
tools and behind which is a palm tree. On the pedestal 
the following inscription of five words in five lines also 
appears: 

" LODGE RISING STAR AT BOMBAY " 

In the rim on the reverse of the medal is the inscrip- 
tion: 

" Founded for the reception of native gentlemen 
December 15th, 1843." 

The size of the medal is 45 mm. and its weight 37 
grammes. 

The last thing that the memorable meeting of 16th 
December, 1844, did was to pass a resolution: " That the 
medal be presented to the venerable father of the Right 
Worshipful Master Dr. Burnes at Montrose." 



28 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The last meeting of the year was held on St. John's Day, 
27th December, 1844, and Right Worshipful Brother Dr. 
Burnes was duly reinstalled as Master, and he invested 
his 11 office-bearers, viz., substitute master, past master, 
wardens, deacons, treasurer, secretary, interpreter and 
director of ceremonies, and guards with the respective 
jewels of their offices. This was the largest attended 
meeting of the lodge of the whole year, and amongst the 
visiting brethren were two distinguished personages, viz.* 
the Marquis de Ferriere La Voyer and Lord Viscount 
Sandall (or as his name is given in the minute book Lord 
Viscount Suirdale) and they were unanimously elected 
honorary members, and then the lodge was closed and 
the brethren went from labour to refreshment. The 
Marquis was in Bombay on his way to France after 
having creditably held the high office of Principal 
Secretary to the Embassy from the King of France to the 
Emperor of China, and had been that very night initiated 
into the order of Freemasonry in an English lodge 
through the courtesy of Dr Burnes. Lord Sandall was 
the grandson of the then late Right Worshipful Grand 
Master of Ireland and was a very zealous Mason. 

Certain proceedings recorded in the minute book, as 
supplementary proceedings of 27th December, 1844, show 
that the lodge was then held in its very infancy in very 
high esteem by the lodges in the sister presidencies and 
also in England and Scotland, and also bring back to 
memory the noble sentiments and cordial wishes of the 
French nobleman which hitherto have remained hidden 
in the records of the lodge. 

At the banqueting board a European visiting bro- 
ther proposed that the speech delivered that evening by 
the distinguished French Marquis be translated from 
French into English by Brother Maneckji Cursetji and 
recorded in the records of the lodge, and the Right 
Worshipful Master accordingly directed that the toast 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 29 

.and the speeches which it elicited in reply, in relation to 
the lodge, be recorded which was done as follows : 

The next toast which the Right Worshipful proposed 
was one, he said, of peculiar interest, it was "Prosperity 
to the Rising Star of Western India," a lodge erected 
under peculiar circumstances, and of which the first 
anniversary was celebrated lately. Its working had 
given him, and all interested in its welfare, entire 
satisfaction, which must be attributed to the zealous 
exertions of its officers, both European and Native. 

Brother Compton returned thanks, in the absence of 
the Substitute Master, Brother Larkworthy, in the 
name of f >he European officers of the Star. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji, in doing the same on the 
part of the Native officers, said : "The native brethren 
.are not insensible of the kindness which prompted the 
Right Worshipful the Provincial Grand Master never to 
omit opportunities, whenever he had any, of taking 
such favourable notice as he had that evening done of 
the Lodge Rising Star of Western India, a lodge ex- 
pressly erected, and for the first time in India, for the 
admission of native gentlemen of acknowledged integrity. 
That it has already been a source of self-gratulation to 
the native brethren to find that this, their infant lodge, 
has been kindly and favourably noticed, not only in the 
sister presidencies, but even in several of the Provincial 
Lodge meetings in England and Scotland ; that from the 
circumstance of the presence of their foreign visitor, 
Brother the Marquis De Ferriere, at the meeting of the 
Star, and from what has been witnessed by him, that it 
was not improbable it would attract like notice at the 
capital, and in the provinces of France. Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji would avail himself of the opportunity to say 
how much he is personally indebted to the spirit of Free- 
masonry in France. Between some of the lodges there 
.and the Rising Star of Western India there exists a 



30 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

relationship, for the first native member of the latter 
was initiated into one of the former, " A la Gloire de 
r Universe " under the warrant of dispensation from the 
Most Venerable of the " Grand Orient," his respected &nd 
distinguished friend the Duke of Gaze. That there was 
some difficulty as to the admission of natives into our 
Order before, but that difficulty was surmounted to a 
great extent by his (Brother Maneckji Cursetji's) initia- 
tion at Paris, and it therefore gave him no small 
satisfaction to have been in some degree instrumental 
in introducing our newly elected Brother, the Marquis 
de Ferriere, into our Order that night and who so justly 
deserved the warmth of our greetings." 

The Marquis de Ferriere LaVoyer again rose to assure 
the meeting that he was touched with all he heard so 
flattering for himself and his country, and if anything 
could add to the emotions excited within him by the 
discourse to which he so fiadly replied, it" would be 
without doubt the words which their Parsee brother,. 
(Maneckji Cursetji) had so eloquently pronounced. It 
was indeed to him (the Marquis) agreeable thus far 
from France, and on a soil where the tri-coloured flag 
wafts but seldom, to receive testimony of such cordial 
sympathy on the part of a member of that nation of 
illustrious exiles, which France only knows by name. 
If he, the Marquis, was not mistaken, a Parsee, even who* 
had just addressed him in such a kind manner, went, 
without being stopped by the obstacles which his religion 
opposes to distant journey, even to France, where he 
worthily represented his countrymen. It was even in 
Franca, under the auspices of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Master, that he, the son' of India, and the first 
Parsee Mason was invested with the insignia of our 
most holy Brotherhood in the same manner aa he, a 
child of France, has been received as an apprentice in a 
lodge of Bombay, by the especial favour of its learned 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 31 

and honoured Provincial Grand Master. That they see 
at that moment a double example of the valuable effects 
of Masonry,, the admingling together of members from 
the most distant parts of the world. He (the Marquis) 
said he was going to propose not a toast, but a wish that 
they might see more frequently in Paris and in London 
the Parsees of the East. Our esteemed brother had given 
the first example, may that example be followed, and his 
compatriots bring back, as he has done, such good 
recollections of, and such extensive sentiment in favour 
of, the civilization of the inhabitants of Europe. As to 
the other part of his double toast, the Marquis added 
that he was^ there, a Frenchman, his first step in Masonry 
was taken into an English lodge. Might he, therefore, 
be permitted to consider this fact as a symbol of the 
union of two empires which held in their hands the 
peace of the world, this holy and distinguished object of 
Freemasonry. He, therefore, most cordially proposed re- 
peated voyages of the Parsees to France and to England, 
and the frequent appearance of the flag which protects 
the men and the manufactures of France in the ports of 
India. The Marquis sat down amidst great applause. 

Thus closed the first and very eventful year of the 
existence of the lodge with fifty members on its roll, of 
whom two noblemen were honorary members, one a 
French Viscount and the other an Irish Peer. No 
statement of the funds or the accounts is given in the 
minutes of this year, but from the minutes of the year 
1851, which will be referred to in connection with the 
events of that year, it appears that the total receipts 
were Rs. 1,956, and that the total expenditure was 
Rs. 1,749-13-8, leaving a balance of Rs. 206-2-4 to the 
credit of the lodge. 

By the end of the year the lodge also got its Charter 
from the Grand Lodge of Scotland. It bears No. 
403 and is dated "Edinburgh, 2nd December, 1844," 



32 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

and was ordained to be issued by the Grand Lodge 
assembled in the Freemason's Hall at Edinburgh upon a 
petition presented to it on the same day in the name of 
Brothers Le Geyt, Danvers and others who had signed the 
original requisition to the Provincial Grand Master with 
the necessary certificates and was signed by the Right 
Hon. George Lord Glenlyon, the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master Mason of Scotland, and the Substitute 
Grand Master, the Senior and Junior Grand Wardens 
and the Grand Secretary and Grand Clerk. This Char- 
ter is kept in the custody of the Master and Wardens for 
the time being of the lodge and exhibited at every lodge 
meeting, so that the same may be bettei^ known and 
more easily observed by all brethren. It authorises the 
lodge to enter apprentices, pass fellow crafts and raise 
master masons upon payment of compositions at their 
initiation of not less than one guinea, and inter alia 
enjoins all brethren not to desert the lodge on any 
account nor upon any pretext whatever to make any 
separate or schismatical meetings independent of the 
Master and Wardens for the time being, nor to introduce 
any other orders of Masonry than those sanctioned, and 
requires them to be bound at all times in full allegiance 
to the Grand Lodge of Scotland and to obey all its acts, 
statutes and regulations, and to record it (the Charter) 
and the minutes of their whole procedure from time to 
time in the books of the lodge,' and to attend the Grand 
Lodge whole general meeting or quarterly communica- 
tions by the Master and Wardens for the time being 
as their representatives or by lawful proxies in their 
names. The Charter was appointed to be recorded in the 
books of the Grand Lodge, and gives the lodge precedence 
in the Grand Lodge as from the date thereof. (See 
Appendix A.) 

From the Freemasons 9 Quarterly Review (September 
Number) it appears that on 24th June, 1844, the Masonic 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C- 33 

fraternity celebrated the anniversary of their patron 
saint, St. John the Baptist, and that on that occasion 
when the brethren retired from labour to refreshment . 
the .eight native members of Lodge Rising Star, including 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji, formed part of the company. 
This was then a novel event in the annals of Freemason- 
ry in Western India and attracted much public attention. 
The Bombay Courier, the daily English newspaper of 
the day, in its issue of 28th June, gave a short account of 
the meeting, and therein animadverted favourably on the 
beauties of the Mystic Order which, it said, brought to- 
gether into one harmonious whole the disciple of Zoroas- 
ter, the follower of the Prophet, and the Christian as 
children of the same Fatjher, though following different 
religions and speaking different languages. The Bombay 
Chabook, a daily vernacular newspaper, wrote an article 
upon this, in which it gave a distorted version of the ac- 
count as appearing in the Courier, and took the latter 
paper severely to task, and it went so far as to say that 
the Parsees, who had become Freemasons and had taken 
baptismal water and become Christians, were alike in its 
opinion no Parsees, because it was nowhere written and no- 
where enjoined in or by the Parsee religion for the Parsees 
to join any assembly celebrating a Christian festival or 
to join with them in taking their meals, and that the cere- 
mony of the festival was on account of St. John, no- 
thing but St John's festival, and that those who could 
worship St. John must once and a hundred and thousand 
times over and over be considered as having separated 
themselves from the Parsee tribe. Then after saying that 
unless Parsees were prevented from joining Freemasonry 
the Parsee religion would be in five or seven years more 
and more enfeebled and that of Christ abundantly spread 
in its stead, the Bombay Chabook said : " Had any poor 
Parsee, even mistakingly, committed such an act, our bro- 
ther, the Jam-e-Jamshed, would have girded his loins, 

3 



34 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

with all the twelve weapons, flashed like lightning, growl- 
ed like thunder and deluged him with rain, but different 
has been the case. Here, sons of Setts are eating dirt by 
way of amusement, and our brother the Jam-e-JamsJied 
being one of the elected buffoons of their table, he has 
hidden himself in the clouds like the moon in the monsoon/* 

The reference to the sons of Setts was clearly a hit at 
Brothers Maneckji Cursetji and Ardeshir Cursetji Wadia 
who had broken through the trammels of bigotry and join- 
ed the noble Order. 

The whole article was full of unjust prejudice which in 
those days filled the native mind against Freemasonry. 

The Courier vindicated itself by exposing the distort- 
ed version. The whole controversy, however, was very 
interesting and may be usefully read as contained in the 
Freemasons 9 Quarterly Review of 1844, pp. 361 to 364. 

It is also recorded in the Freemasons 9 Quarterly Review 
of 1844, pp. 497 to 498, that on 30th July, 1844, Lodge 
St. Andrews in the East of Poona gave a grand Masonic 
entertainment to Dr. Burnes, and presented to him a 
Knight's Cross of the Guelphic Order handsomely set and 
enriched with brilliants as an appropriate badge or jewel 
to commemorate his visit to Poona and consecration of 
that lodge a few months before. At that entertainment 
Dr. Burnes proposed "The Masonic Lodges of Western 
India," and in doing so entered particularly into the 
reasons which had induced him to sanction the then recent 
establishment of the Rising Star for the admission of 
native gentlemen into the Craft. Lodge St. Andrews 
in the East, Poona, comes next after Rising Star and 
bears No. 343 S. C. 

The letter already referred to of " Frater " to the editor 
of the Freemasons' Quarterly Review was as follows : 

" To the Editor of the Freemasons' Quarterly Review. 

Sir, " May* this foundation-stone prove the super- 
structure of a building that shall endure for all a&es" 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 35 

such h the concluding remark of a brief sketch you have 
given of the Lodge Rising Star of Western India in 
No. 5 of your Revieiv, dated March 31st, 1844 ; and in it 
you are most cordially joined by the whole fraternity of 
that distant province, and no doubt by all the brethren 
scattered throughout the globe. Personally I have not the 
honour of your acquaintance, of your predecessor I had ; 
him I knew to be zealous, and have no reason to doubt} 
but that you are the same. Consequently, I suspect it will 
give you as well as no few of your readers pleasure to 
hear a little of the progress of Rising Star, and being 
myself fond of Masonic chit-chat, I will, if you will allow 
me, tell you what we have been doing and how we have 
been doing ik 

You are perhaps aware that the Island of Bombay can 
boast of a greater number of languages, religions, and 
nations amongst its inhabitants than almost any other 
place in the known world ; for, besides considerable 
numbers of every Christian sect, -it contains indefinite 
numbers of Mussaimans, Hindoos and Parsees, neither 
are Jews, Chinese and more or less of every neighbouring 
nation wanting, including in its 300,000 souls some of 
almost every European as well as Asiatic country, 
America being not altogether unrepresented. Be it re- 
membered, too, that the vernacular language of each of 
the parties is still in use at Bombay, although, to some 
little extent, English is known to most. The Roman- 
ist still uses the Portuguese ; the Mussalman Arabic, 
Persian or Hindustani, according to the country from 
whence he is derived ; the Parsee clings with cherished 
fondness to his adopted language, Guzarati, whilst the 
Hindoo of Bombay is colloquial in his native Maharati. 

But to a person unaccustomed to India, what idea can 
be given of the prejudices of caste, or of the impassable 
barrier it opposes, not only between the various nations, 
but the different families of the same nation. Amongst 



36 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

all of them certain foods are religiously forbidden, and 
no two of them will together participate of the same meal r 
the Christian alone being above the prejudice, and freely 
using all God's creatures ; each sect looking upon another 
with no little jealousy and some dread ; the Hindoo and 
Parsee still recollecting the horror and persecution of the 
Mahomedan invasions, and all feeling the present 
supremacy of the British power. With people then of 
these different habits and feelings is the great society of 
Bombay composed ; but it will not be necessary for me 
further to particularize their pecularities, as I tell you 
why, and on what principle, the native lodge has been 
founded. You will recollect that, about the beginning 
of the year 1843, the foundation-stone of Vhe Jamsetji 
Jijibhai Hospital was laid in Bombay, with Masonic 
honours, in the presence of the Founder and the Honour- 
able the Governor, and nothing of the sort having been 
witnessed there before that impressive ceremony, which 
was beautifully performed by the Right Worshipful the 
Provincial Grand Master of Western India, and a large 
assemblage of brethren, it made a considerable impression 
upon the wondering natives, and nothing more so than 
by observing the high and wealthy of the presidency in 
such close communion with their more humble brethren; 
and constant and earnest were the after-enquiries 
respecting the mystic tie that could bind them so 
intimately together. To the inquiring mind the Craft 
have ever been ready and willing to explain to the 
uninitiated the grand principles upon which our Order is 
founded, nor were the Bombay brethren to be the first 
exception, and the result was that many became eager 
for the privilege of wearing the badge of innocence, and 
to be received into the fraternity, some of whom were 
men of well-known talent, enterprise and honour. 

This feeling being observed and examined, some of 
the leading brethren in Bombay, after mature consider- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 37 

ation, determined to gratify their laudable inclinations ; 
but now appeared the difficulty for, on more than one 
occasipn, the only lodge in work in Bombay had negativ- 
ed the admission of any native, even as a joining 
member ; therefore there could be no hope in that quar- 
ter, the opinion of the lodge having been so decidedly 
given. But however we may admire the sincerity of 
its members, we may certainly doubt their judgment 
in the decision come to, and hope that, by the future 
culture of Masonic principle and observation of the fruit 
produced by the Rising Star, the opinion acted upon 
may be prove^d to be erroneous. 

The only plan that could be adopted was to found a 
new lodge for the purpose of the admission of native 
gentlemen, which was accordingly done in the manner 
you have described in your former number, doubly 
guarding each of the grand landmarks of our Order, 
every responsible office being filled by tried men and 
true, till others shall be found to be worthy. One thing, 
however, admits but of little doubt, that Rising Star 
will, before many years shall have passed away, have 
gained such altitude in the heavenly science, that it will 
.shed a brilliancy over the whole of Western India, re- 
turning in tenfold degree the light it is now borrowing 
from the Europaan Brotherhood ; for lodges in India 
generally have not been able long to sustain a character 
they have, for the most part, ephemerally or accidentally 
acquired. For in India most men are but mere birds of 
passage, here to-day and gone to-morrow, and although 
a lodge may have been ably and zealously presided over 
for a time, the Master, even before his term has expired, 
has perhaps been ordered off to a distant station, where 
he may possibly be the only brother. On the contrary 
the greater number of the brethren belonging to a lodge 
in England are permanent residents, who can not only fill 
the various junior offices in the lodge, but after they 



38 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

have received command, can remain to teach the princi- 
ples and doctrines they have learned, and ever after- 
wards to watch over the well-being of the Craft in' their 
immediate neighbourhoods. In this way, too, may we 
hope to see the Lodge Rising Star in after years. The 
majority of its members being residents it will remain 
as a depository for the Masonic lore of Western India, 
and by the correctness of its ceremonial and accuracy of 
its working, become a means of permanent instruction 
that has been but too seldom available in this distant 
land. 

Our ancient charges having particularly guarded us 
against admitting anyone to a participation of our 
secrets, who, we have not good ground for believing, will 
ultimately reflect honour on the Craft, would of course in- 
duce an attentive listening to all the dangers and incon- 
veniences attending the admission of the native of India 
into our lodges, that were made by some anxious and 
zealous brethren, and every precaution that foresight and 
knowledge could take have been adopted to sustain the 
purity of the sanctuary, and consequently two or three 
deviations from the usual customs have been adopted; 

for instance, the declaration commences 'I in the fear 

and belief of the only one true and living God, of a state 
of reward and punishment after life, for deeds done in the 
flesh, and of the nature and import of a solemn 
obligation/ Then follows the usual one, p. 85, para. 3 of 
the Constitutions, which is not only signed in English, 
but the vernacular of the candidate, after a viva voce 
examination by a brother in whom confidence can be 
placed. Again, an examination is entered into regarding 
the nature and import of the serious promise before it is 
made a solemn obligation, so that no part of it may be 
by any possibility misunderstood, or rashly entered into, 
but impressed with all the solemnity that part of the cere- 
mony is so peculiarly capable of receiving. But the great 



OF WESTERN INDIA No- 342 S.C. 39 

point, the obligation, how is that administered? In every 
respect in the usual way; but again with an addition, for 
each is re-obligated on what he considers as most binding 
on Ms conscience. For instance, the Mahomedan, although 
he believes in the Old Testament, does not believe in the 
divinity of Christ; therefore, any obligation taken by him 
on the Gospels would not be binding on his conscience, 
as is the case with an obligation taken on the Koran ; 
therefore, he is re-obligated upon that book, in the same 
way as the Jew is re-obligated on the Pentateuch. As 
Masons, the Bible is ever open before us, it is our 
great light the light of the Law and the Prophets; but 
as Christians we have also the light of revelation attach- 
ed to it, to guide us in our pilgrimage of life, and which 
is necessary for the obligation of a Christian Mason, as 
no other would be binding on a Christian's conscience, 
but which would not be so either on the Mussalman or 
the Hebrew, the one in his faith stopping short, and the 
other going beyond it. These deviations, or rather 
additions, were considered necessary and proper, and to 
afford a sufficient additional safeguard for the keeping 
inviolate our sacred mysteries, and were determined on 
by those who have taken the responsibility of the native 
lodge upon their shoulders, and who will not leave their 
brethren with a bare initiation into the ceremonial 
mysteries of our Order, but who can and will carefully 
instruct them in the principles and in the working out 
of the grand end and aim of the institution, to show 
them that there is at least one place here on earth where 
men of every denomination may meet on terms of 
brotherhood and equality, whatever may be his colour, 
or whatever may be his creed, so long as he believes in 
the one true and living God, looks forward hereafter for 
reward or punishment for deeds done in the flesh, and 
lives an honest and upright life before his God, and with 
his neighbour ; and to prove to them, that although 



40 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

their different prejudices will not allow them to eat 
together, they may advantageously join together in the 
performance of good works, and in the cultivation of 
every virtue, that brotherly love may be encouraged, 
relief practised, and truth be triumphant ; that they may 
be taught to despise the littleness of sectarian prejudices 
and to view in every son of Adam a brother of the dust. 

At the first regular meeting of the lodge two initia- 
tions took place : one a Parsee, the other a Mahomedan, 
both of them of the most respectable of their own people, 
the former a particularly intelligent and clever man, a 
F. R. S., and possessing considerable scientific acquire- 
ments, but unfortunately those who are nearest and dear- 
est to him are not quite so enlightened as himself, and 
cannot be brought to look with complacency on the step 
he has taken, and consequently he has been subjected to 
considerable annoyance, so much so that others have 
shrunk from encountering it. But this is nothing more 
than Freemasonry has been accustomed to in all ages 
from the powerful ignorant and the bigot, and what is 
not even discontinued by the enlightened (!) European 
in our own day, as so recently exhibited to the world at 
large in the Malta Pastoral ; therefore, it is not to be ex- 
pected that its course could be more smooth and even 
among a new people, with manners and habits so differ- 
ent from European nations. Nor are we astonished or 
surprised at finding some of the old but most influential 
native gentlemen putting, as far as they can do so, a 
direct veto on those over whom they have influence from 
entering into the Order, whilst the only reason assigned 
is that it will bring them into too near a contact with 
Europeans, and that they may be led to eat and drink with 
them; and most Indian families being still conducted on 
the patriarchal principle, and all branches of it generally 
residing under one roof, this check har, had some influ- 
ence, especially amongst the Parsees. Still, however, there 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C* 41 

have been already eight initiations of native gentlemen 
into our Order, and others have gone through preliminaries 
that will enable them to be introduced at subsequent meet- 
ings* and their conduct and example will no doubt ulti- 
mately soften down, if not entirely do away with, existing 
prejudices which a want of knowledge alone has given 
Tbirth to, for the bright light of truth must one day clear 
away the dark and dismal clouds of calumny, superstition 
and ignorance. 

Nevertheless, the Bombay brethren do not look for- 
ward to, or wish for, either a great influx of members, 
or a rapid advancement of them through the different 
degrees; on* the contrary, they are most careful and 
cautious in their selections. It is not to all who knock that 
the door is opened; but most anxious are they that no 
objectionable person should gain admittance. The fee is 
high, and the scrutiny severe, whilst the examination 
before advancement is critical and searching, and a good, 
practical knowledge of one degree is required before a 
second step is given, the bye-laws requiring a much 
longer period to elapse than stated by the Constitu- 
tions. 

One point more, and I have done for the present. The 
Lodge Rising Star ranks under the banners of the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland, in common with all the lodges 
at present working in Western India. Unnatural mothers 
will ever produce undutif ul children ; the Grand Lodge of 
England having proved herself an inattentive and dis- 
obliging guardian, a foster-mother has been found, who 
will watch more carefully over her adopted children. To 
the citizen of the world it little signifies under what ban- 
ner he ranges himself, provided it be a truly Masonic one ; 
and whether the Rose, the Shamrock, or the Thistle be 
emblazoned upon it, he can still work on with that love 
and harmony that should ever characterise free and ac- 
cepted Masons. But with age parents become feeble and 



42 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

often disabled. It, therefore, behoves them to cherish 
their offspring so that in the evening of weakness and in 
trouble, youthful and willing Lewises may be found to 
lend their strength and support when needed. 'But 
children cannot always endure neglect, even from their 
parent much may be borne ; but there is a point at 
which even filial love will cease. 

Bombay, June 19, 1844. FRATER. 

Brother A. C. Wadia and Mirza Ali Mahomed Shoos- 
try were the first two members initiated into the lodge, 
and they are the Parsee and Mahomedan initiates refer- 
red to in para. 7 of this admirable letter. 



CHAPTER III. 



DURING the second year (1845) the Lodge maintained 
its progress. Twelve new members were enrolled, two of 
whom were initiates, three joining members and seven 
honorary members. There were eight meetings held, of 
which six were regular and one was special, and one the 
anniversary, meeting, and there were two initiations and 
two raisings which was much less degree work than that 
done during the first year. 

A very important resolution was passed in the com- 
mencement of the yoar, the effect of which wa that the 
lodge became practicably allied to, if not amalgamated 
with, Lodge Perseverance. It emanated from the same 
sympathetic brother who was the founder of the lodge 
and was supported by Brothers Larkworthy and Maneckji 
Cur set ji, and was proposed at the meeting held on 15th 
February, 1845 and passed nem con at the next meeting 
held on 15th March in the following terms: 

" That the actual members of the Lodge Perseverance 
be considered extra members of the Lodge Rising Star 
of Western India, be warned of its meetings, and be 
entitled to all the privileges of ordinary members ex- 
cepting that of speaking or voting on questions before 
the lodge.'' 

Lodge Perseverance had also, it appears, passed at its 
meeting held on 3rd March, 1845 a similar resolution 
according a similar privilege to members of this lodge 
which, by the resolution above quoted, was granted to 
the members of that lodge, and a copy of that resolution 
was communicated to Brother Maneckji Cursetji by the 



44 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Secretary of that lodge with the following covering- 
letter:- 

Bombay, 15th March 1845. <. 

Dear Sir and Brother, I have been requested by the 
Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance to forward to 
you, for the information of the Right Worshipful Master, 
officers and brethren of the Lodge Rising Star, the 
annexed copy of a resolution which was unanimously 
passed by the brethren at the last lodge meeting of 
Perseverance of the 3rd instant, and at the same time to 
state that it will afford the members of that lodge the 
highest gratification to welcome amongst them ttie native 
brethren of the Lodge Rising Star in the prosperity of 
which Perseverance cannot but feel a deep interest. 

Yours fraternally, 
A. HUGH THOMAS, 
Secy., Lodge Perseverance. 
To 

BRO. MANECKJI CURSETJI, 

SECY. TO LODGE RISING STAR 

OF WESTERN INDIA. 



Resolution unanimously passed by the brethren of the 
Lodge Perseverance, at its meeting on the 3rd March, 
1845. 

" That the actual members of the Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India be considered extra members of Lodge 
Perseverance, be warned of its meetings, and be entitled 
to all the privileges of ordinary members excepting that 
of speaking and voting on questions before the lodge." 

The following reply was sent to this letter : 

Bombay, 15th March, 1845. 
To 

BRO. HUGH THOMAS, 

SECY., LODGE PERSEVERANCE. 

Dear Sir and Brother, I have the pleasure to acknow- 
ledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th instant 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3^2 S.C. 45 

enclosing for the information of the Right Worshipful 
Master, officers, and members of the Lodge Rising Star 
of Western India a copy of the resolution passed by our 
sisjter, Lodge Perseverance, to the effect that " the actual 
members of the Lodge Rising Star of Western India be 
considered extra members of Perseverance, be warned 
of its meetings, and be entitled to all the privileges of 
ordinary members, excepting that of speaking and voting 
on questions before the lodge/' 

Through some mistake your kind communication under 
reply did not reach me till after our meeting of the 15th 
instant, but it is now in the course of circulation for the 
information of the actual members of the Lodge Rising 
Star of Western India. 

It affords me sincere gratification in the meantime to 
acquaint you for the information of the Worshipful 
Master, officers and members of the Lodge Perseverance 
that a resolution similar in every respect to the one you 
enclosed me has been unanimously passed at a meeting of 
the Lodge Rising Star of Western India, on the 15th in- 
stant, according the same privilege to the members of the 
Perseverance in our lodge which they have so kindly 
accorded us into theirs, the object being reciprocally to 
advance the interest of Freemasonry. 

I have, by the command of our Right Worshipful, to 
add, that the members of the Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India will always with delight welcome the 
members of the Lodge Perseverance at our lodge meet- 
ings of which you shall be regularly kept acquainted 
for their information, and am, Dear Sir and Brother 
Secretary, 

Yours fraternally, 
MANECKJI CURSETJI, 
Secy., Rising Star of Western India. 
The letter of the Secretary of Lodge Perseverance re- 
fers only to the native brethren of this lodge but that 



46 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

must have been for the simple reason that they were the 
only brethren to be admitted as extra members as the 
European brethren were the actual members of that body. 

After the passing of the resolution by the lodge, the 
members of Lodge Perseverance attended its meetings as 
extra members and some of them- at times even officiated 
as office-bearers. 

The two new members initiated were Brothers Mirza 
Ali Akbar, Khan Bahadur, and Aga> Mahomed Bauker 
Khan. The former was the Munshi to the Government of 
Scinde and was on a short visit to Bombay and was desir- 
ous of being admitted into the lodge. It was, however, 
not possible for him to remain in Bombay for mpre than a 
fortnight, owing to the exigencies of public service, and 
he therefore applied to the Provincial Grand Master to 
grant him a special dispensation so as to allow of his be- 
ing initiated at once after being brought to the ballot. 
His application stated as his recommendation that he was 
connected with the public service and had been publicly 
mentioned by H. E. Sir Charles Napier and H. E. the 
Governor-General-in-CounciL Brothers Maneckji Cur- 
set ji and Mahomed Jaffer supported his application, but 
not until after the former had by command of the 
Right Worshipful Master instituted an inquiry into his 
character and qualifications of Right Worshipful Bro- 
thers Captains Lamart and Barr, who were supposed to 
know him, and had received a favourable report. The 
application was entertained by the Provincial Grand 
Master and the candidate was then brought to the ballot 
at the lodge meeting, which, to suit his convenience, was 
held on 10th May instead of 15th May, 1845. The appli- 
cation, the letter of inquiry and the replies thereto were 
read, and thereupon two visiting brethren, namely, Bro- 
thers Lieut. G. D. Byng, Aide-de-Camp to H. E. the Gove- 
rnor of Scinde, and Captain St. Berry of H. M.'s 87th 
Regiment, addressed the lodge in support of the applica- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 47 

lion of the candidate, describing him as an individual in 
-every way worthy of admission into the order of Free- 
masonry. The candidate was then duly elected and ini- 
tiate^. Copies of this application and Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji's letter of inquiry and replies are set out in the 
minute book and show how highly the privilege of be- 
longing to the lodge was valued by the applicant and 
also how, even though the lodge was only a year old 
and must have acquired a good number of members for 
being able to maintain itself, strict were the principles 
on which admission was granted- They are quite worth 
a perusal. 

The three,, joining members were Brothers Charles 
Berry, Henry Cony bear e and Dr.W. S. Stuart. 

The seven honorary members were Bros. Capt. Frederick 
W. Birch, Dr. George Oliver, C. F. Crucifix, J. Lamart, 
De Caravon, Lord Elphinstone, and the Very Worship- 
ful Brother W. A. Laurie. 

Brother Captain Birch was an eminent and zealous 
Mason and was then late Officiating Provincial Grand 
Master of Bengal, and according to Right Worshipful 
Brother Dr. Burnes, upon whose proposal he was en- 
rolled as an honorary member, had been watching the 
proceedings of the lodge with the greatest interest. In 
a letter written by him to Brother Secretary acknow- 
ledging the high honour done to him he wished success to 
the lodge which he said he regarded as a means of great 
good in bringing into immediate contact and mutual 
appreciation worthy men whom prejudice and habit had 
hitherto kept asunder. 

Brother Lamart was the Past Master of the lodges 
"Orient in the East " of Poona and of " Hope" of Karachi, 
and was a visiting brother at the lodge meeting of 15th 
March, 1845. The Right Worshipful Master expressed 
his great gratification at his presence and requested him 
to officiate as Past Master which he did. It seems that a 



48 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

visiting brother of high standing was in those days accord- 
ed special honour by being requested to officiate as Past 
Master so as to regard him as a brother the very next 
in rank for the time being to the presiding officer at 
the meeting, for at another meeting held on 15th Sep- 
tember, 1845, Right Worshipful Brother Buchanan, W. M. 
of Lodge St. Andrews in the East, also a visiting brother, 
had the same honour : and at a meeting held on 13th 
February, 1846, Brother Grant, also a visiting brother who 
was created an honorary member, officiated as a Past 
Master. While returning thanks for his kind reception 
Brother Lamart expressed a desire to be admitted an 
honorary member of the lodge and the Right,. Worshipful 
Master promised to bring his solicitation to the notice of 
the lodge on a suitable opportunity. This however was 
not long in coming, for at the very next meeting held on 
16th May, 1845, that brother was duly proposed, ballotted 
for and unanimously elected as an honorary member. 

It was at the same meeting that Brother Crucifix, 
who was the editor of the Quarterly Revieiv, and Brother 
Dr. George Oliver, the eminent historian of the Craft, 
and the Very Worshipful Brother W. A. Laurie, the Grand 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge, of Scotland, were also 
unanimously elected honorary members ; and it appears 
that Brother Crucifix was so elected in consequence of a 
letter written by him to the Right Worshipful Master, 
and an extract from which, the minutes say, was read at 
the meeting. That brother, in acknowledging by letter 
the compliment paid to him, said it was indeed an honour 
most gratifying, emanating from a lodge where such 
practical proof existed of the universally philanthropic 
character of our glorious institution, acknowledging no 
other distinctions amongst men save those devoted to 
virtue and integrity. 

Brother De Caravon was the nephew of the Duke de 
Gaze the Most Venerable of the Grand Orient of France. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 49 

He was present, as a visiting Brother, at the second 
anniversary meeting held on 15th December, 1845, and 
was unanimously elected thereat an Honorary member. 
He. was therefore the second Frenchman who became a 
member of the lodge. 

The Right Honourable and Right Worshipful Brother 
Lord Elphinstone was then the Ex-Governor of Madras 
and Provincial Grand Master of that Presidency and 
was the nephew of the Governor of Bombay the 
Honourable Mountstuart Elphinstone. He was on a visit 
to Bombay in December 1845, and an invitation was sent 
to him by the lodge, but owing to the shortness of his 
stay he was unable to accept it and was besides prevented 
by other unavoidable engagements from being present 
at the second anniversary meeting of the lodge which 
he would otherwise have been most happy to have done 
as expressed in a note to Brother Secretary. The Right 
Worshipful Master suggested at that meeting that the 
least thing the lodge could do to ma-rk its sense on the 
occasion of His Lordship being amongst them and in 
addition to the ground of his having held the exalted 
office of Grand Master among the fraternity of Madras, 
that of his being the nephew of the Governor of Bombay, 
would be to elect him an Honorary member and to present 
him with its medal. The following resolution was then 
proposed by Right Worshipful Brother Dr. Burnes, se- 
conded by Brother Maneckji Cursetji, and supported by 
the Wardens, and unanimously passed by acclamation : 

"That the lodge records its sincere regret that 
unavoidable circumstances as explained in his note to 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji have prevented the Right 
Worshipful Brother Lord- Elphinstone from visiting us 
this evening. That His Lordship be elected an Honorary 
member of this lodge and that the compliment be accom- 
panied by a gift of the lodge medal to His Lordship. The 
present resolution to be communicated to His Lordship by 

4 



50 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji with an assurance of our 
friendly regard in reference to His Lordship's note of this 
date to him." 

The resolution was in due course communicated to 
Brother Lord Elphinstone and he vouchsafed the follow- 
ing reply: 

Par el, 17th December, 1845. 

To MANECKJI CURSETJI ESQ. 
My Dear Sir, 

The resolution of the Lodge Rising Star of Western 
India, which you have been so good as to communicate to 
me, does but increase the regret that I feel at not 
having been present at its anniversary meeting on 
Monday. 

I shall be proud to receive at your hands my Diploma 
and the Medal of the Lodge which will always remind 
me of the great and unmerited distinction and kindness 
with which I have been treated by my brother Masons 
at Bombay, which assuredly will not be the least among 
the many gratifying reminiscences which I shall retain 
of this place. 

I remain, My Dear Sir, 
Your faithful servant and Brother, 

ELPHINSTONE. 

The Very Worshipful Brother W. A. Laurie was the 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Scotland and was the 
first Brother holding that office who was brought on the 
rolls of the lodge. 

Against the addition of twelve members the lodge 
sustained the loss of one by death, namely of Brother 
Ward, who was the brother-in-law (wife's brother) of the 
Right Worshipful Master Dr. Burnes. 

There was always a fairly good attendance of members, 
extra members and visitors at all the regular meetings 
and besides the visiting Brethren, of whom mention has 



OF WESTERX IXDIA Xo. 342 S.C. 51 

already been made, are found the names of two Brothers, 
namely, Worshipful Brother Brett, who was the Worship- 
ful Master of Lodge St. John in Sind, Hyderabad, and 
Worshipful Brother Musgrave, who was a Past Master of 
Lodge StAndrews of London and of whom Brother Brett 
became a joining member from the commencement of the 
next year. 

Right Worshipful Brother Dr. Burnes had been re- 
quested previously by the Brethren to continue in office 
for another year but he was not willing to do so on 
personal grounds and also because his acceptance of the 
office would have been against the Constitutions. 

Before therefore the election was proceeded with he 
exhorted the Brethren not to vote for him, but to elect 
another Brother to the office which he was to vacate, in 
an address which was quite characteristic of him and 
instructive to the Brethren and has been recorded in the 
minute book as follows: 
My Dear Brethren, 

" The revolution of another year, which I rejoice to 
think finds us greatly increased in numbers, and proceed- 
ing under most favourable circumstances, with the loss 
of only one member of our lodge by death imposes on me 
the necessity of relinquishing the chair, and on you the 
obligation of selecting a Brother to occupy it whom you 
conscientiously believe to be able and willing to fulfil its 
important duties, most important and responsible, indeed, 
I may call them, when the objects, peculiarities and diffi- 
culties of this lodge are considered. 

'' Acting under the influence of that partiality with 
which the Craft here has been pleased invariably to 
distinguish me, some of the Brethren have requested that 
I should still retain the chair, but I have already occupied 
it for two years successively and the Constitutions are 
imperative that no brother shall hold the office of Master 
for a longer period, unless under a special dispensation 



52 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

from the Grand Master or the Provincial Grand Master,, 
declaring the case to be one of absolute necessity. 

" It is manifest, therefore, that even were it not the 
bounden duty of the office to which I have been elevated 
in the Craft to maintain strictly its rules and ordinances, 
I could not permit myself to be put again in nomination, 
for the Mastership without issuing a formal declaration 
to glorify myself, and depreciate my Brethren, in other 
words to pronounce myself the only member of the 
lodge qualified for the chair. 

" But this is a glaring absurdity, dear Brethren, which, 
you will not conceive me capable of contemplating, and 
I only make this allusion to it in order that I may follow 
it up with the request that no Brother will vote for me 
at the approaching election, since neither consistently 
with my feelings as a Mason, nor my ideas as a gentle- 
man, could I again accept office. 

" The lodge contains many able and eminent Brethren,, 
quite willing I am sure, to forego personal convenience to* 
accept the onerous but at the same time most 
honorable office of Master, some of them, I hesitate not 
in truth to say, far better instructed Masons than I am 
and better able to perform the duties. Of these, one 
Brother has been too conspicuous not to have attracted 
universal observation, my selection of him to be substitute 
Master sufficiently indicates my personal appreciation of 
his merits and qualifications and his claims to the consi- 
deration of the lodge were acknowledged in a remarkable 
manner at our last anniversary by the vote to him of a 
medal which through some mismanagement has not yet 
reached us, but wiiich I have reason to believe is now 
on its way from England. 

" Nevertheless, Brethren, the Provincial Grand Master 
of Western India has a little right to interfere with the 
freedom of election and the integrity of the ballot as the 
last received apprentice, and it is to your alreadyunbias- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 53 

^d suffrages that I leave the selection of him who is to 
rule over you, never doubting that you will ever keep in 
view the Masonic maxim that it is on real worth and 
personal merit only that all preferment amongst Masons 
is grounded. 

' I have only to add that I cannot relinquish the chair 
.of the Lodge Rising Star of Western India without con- 
gratulating the Brethren on its steady progress, the 
.great interest it has excited throughout the Masonic 
world, and the vast advantages it now promises to hold 
forth in the objects which the Craft has in view in a new 
.and mighty sphere. 

' Two great causes have operated since the establish- 
ment of the lodge in producing these happy results, 
and on these also I sincerely congratulate you. Long 
may they continue to influence us, need I say that I allude 
to the undisturbed unanimity which has prevailed amongst 
the members, and to the activity and masonic propriety 
which has characterised the conduct of the officers. 
Both have been a source of sincere continued grati- 
fication to me supporting me in trying circumstances, 
and drawing more closely the bonds of brotherly love 
between us, and from my heart I thank you all and 
individually for the affectionate and truly masonic 
manner in which they have been exhibited." 

This remarkable address as truly masonic as was the 
reply from the same distinguished brother to the requisi- 
tion for the establishment of the lodge (and for that 
reason never to be forgotten) seems only to have further 
decided the brethren in insisting upon their request but 
as the objection of the Right Worshipful Master could 
not be overcome and as there was not a large attendance 
of the members at the meeting it was resolved that the 
election of the Master should be postponed till 27th 
December 1845, on which day a special meeting should be 
called for the purpose. 



54 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The Lodge accordingly met on 27th December. The 
Right Worshipful Master again declined acceptance of 
the chair as being contrary to the Constitutions but the 
Brethren again urged upon him strongly to waive,. his 
objection to granting the dispensation even though it be to> 
re-elect him to the chair for the third year, but upon the 
Right Worshipful Master still refusing the honour, the 
Brethren unanimously and by acclamation elected him 
Honorary Master of the lodge and then elected Brother 
Larkworthy as the new Master. 

The receipts during the year were only 846 which with 
the last year's credit balance made up a total of 
Rs. 1,052-2-9. The disbursements amounted to Rs.. 
1,204-15-9 so that Rs. 152-13-0 stood to the debit. 

Brothers Maneckji Cursetji and Mahomed Jaffer were,, 
it may here he noted two out of the twenty-four promoters 
of a new order called " The Brotherhood of the Olive 
Branch in the East" which Dr. Burnes was endeavouring 
about the end of this year (1845) to establish in Western 
India with the object inter alia of giving a fresh impulse 
to truth, charity and enlightenment, by increased spread 
of masonic principles and practice, and to supply to 
natives of the East who w r ere Masons, a substitute of 
the higher chivalric degrees, their exclusion from which 
had created heart-burning. In the Freemason's Quarterly 
Review, 1845, pp. 377-8 is given a short notice of this 
proposed order, which however does not seem to have 
been actually instituted. 



CHAPTER IV. 

1 846- THE year 1846 opened with 60 members on the 
roll and 17 more were added by the time it closed and 
these 17 consisted of 13 Honarary and 4 Joining members. 
Against the 17 additions there was one resignation. 

Worshipful Brother Larkworthy, who was the Master- 
elect, declined at the very first meeting held on the 17th 
February, o accept the office for that year begging to 
be allowed to adhere to a resolution made by him in 
that behalf, whereupon his explanation was recorded 
and the election of the new master was postponed 
to the next meeting. Right Worshipful Brother Dr. 
Burnes, the Honarary Master who presided at the next 
meeting held on 15th June 1846, announced to the 
lodge thereat, that he had been promoted to the rank 
of Superintending Surgeon and had of necessity to 
quit Bombay and that was another reason of his re- 
linquishing the chair and entreated the Brethren to 
proceed to elect a new Master, whereupon a ballot was 
taken and Brother LeGeyt was declared unanimously 
chosen for the office. Brother LeGeyt was the Deputy 
Provincial Grand Master, and on Dr. Burnes leaving 
Bombay, became the Provincial Grand Master of 
Western India. 

The Brethren resolved at the same meeting to hold a 
festival or social entertainment in Dr. Burnes' honor 
before his departure to mark their esteem of him by a 
public expression of it by inviting him to it in accordance 
with masonic custom and he was requested to name a 
day, convenient to him for meeting them but for want of 
time he was unable to accept the invitation which he 



56 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

declined in a letter of which the following has been 

recorded as a copy : 

The Right Worshipful P. W. LEGEYT, 

Dy. Pro. Grand Master of Western India, Bombay." 

" Bombay 19th, August 18&6. 
Right Worshipful my dear and esteemed Brother, 

Deeply do I appreciate the honor which my valued 
Brethren contemplate for me and which you have tendered 
to me in such terms of marked kindness, but situated 
as I am, it is altogether out of my power to accept it. I 
am only directing the removal of my baggage to start 
on an urgent duty to Gujrat. I expect to quit Bombay 
on Saturday and there is no time thus at hand now for 
arranging such an entertainment as you refer to. 

I ask you to express to the Brethren with my fraternal 
and affectionate regards my deep regret. I am forced 
to part from them and that before day, so I am unable 
even in person to say farewell to them and to thank them 
for all their love and brotherly kindness to me. 

I ask you also to rule over them in peace and charity 
as my delegate and representative taking upon yourself 
the office of Provincial Grand Master the duties of which 
you are so well able to fulfil. Praying that! the Grand 
Architect of the Universe may bless you and them. 
I remain, Right Worshipful Brother, 
Your affectionate friend and faithful Brother, 

JAMES BURNES. 

Right Worshipful Brother LeGeyt was then duly 
placed in the chair at the meeting following his election 
and as the minutes show, while the lodge was working 
in the 1st degree and the office-bearers of the preceding 
year were requested by him to continue to act until the 
then ensuing St. John's Day. 

There was no degree work done during the year there 
being no initiates and there were only four meetings 
held during the whole year. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 57 

The four joining members were Right Worshipful 
Brothers Brett, Joseph Glen., W, G. Allan and Captain 
Forster. Brother Brett was the Worshipful Master of 
Lodge St. John, Sind Hyderabad and Brother Glen was the 
Provincial Grand Warden of Western India and Brothers 
Allan and Forster were members of Lodge Perseverance 
who were already extra-members of the lodge. 

The Honorary Members were the following : 

1. Right Worshipful Brother, The Right Honorable 

James Andrew, Earl of Dalhousie, K.T.K.G., Past 
Grand Master Mason of Scotland. 

2. His Excellency Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas 

Mc^lahon, Ba,rt., K.C.B., Commander-in-Chief of 
the Bombay Army. 

3. Sir W. C. Harris, Past Provincial Grand Master of 

Western India. 

4. John Grant, Provincial Grand Master of Bengal and 

Past Provincial Grand Master of Western India. 

-5. W. C. Blacquierre, Past Provincial Grand Master 
of Bengal and also Past Master, Lodge " Star in 
the East, " Calcutta. 

. Lieut-Colonel William Burlton, C. B. Deputy Pro- 
vincial Grand Master of Bengal. 

7. Very Worshipful Brother John Cameron, Honorary 

Provincial Grand Superintendent of Works, 
Western India. 

8. Very Worshipful Brother Dr. M. De Kerwang ( a 

Frenchman). 

9. Very Worshipful Brother James Burnes, Past Mas- 

ter, "Lodge, St. Peter's Montrose," No. 154 S.C. 

10. Very Worshipful Brother Adam Burnes, Past 

Master, " Lodge, St. Peter's Montrose" No. 154 
S.C. 

11. Very Worshipful Brother John Holmes of Karachi. 

12. Very Worshipful Brother James Anderson of 

Arbroath, Scotland. 



58 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

13. Very Worshipful Brother Charles S. Evans of 
London also a member of Lodge Perseverance. 

The list of honorary members was one of exalted and 
distinguished as also esteemed and eminent Freemasons 
holding very high and responsible positions in the craft. 
It included an Earl a Baronet and a Knight all of Eng- 
land and also Brethren hailing from France and other 
places on the Continent and India all of whom were also 
presented with the founder's medal to be worn by them 
on all occasions of masonic ceremony. 

Right Worshipful Brothers, The Earl of Dalhousie, Sir 
Thomas MacMahon, Grant, W. C. Blacquierre and Lt.- 
Colonel Burlton received the distinction on account of their 
exalted positions, the very Worshipful Brother Cameron 
in recognition of services rendered by him to the Craft 
of Bombay and Brothers James Burnes, Adams Burnes, 
Holmes and Anderson because they were relatives of the 
founder and evidently out of regard for that Ruler in the 
infant stage of the lodge. Brother Sir W. C. Harris was 
rewarded in appreciation of the valuable assistance he 
is stated to have given in superintending the execution 
of the founder's medal in England and Brother Evans 
for the trouble he took in expediting its despatch after 
Brother Sir Harris had quitted England. Brother Dr, 
Kerwang, it appears, was only a year-old Mason but he 
evidently received the honor because of his hailing from 
France. 

(Vide appendix B, for replies received from Brothers 
Burlton, Kerwang, Forster, McMahon, Harris, Evans 
and Anderson and from Brothers Birch, Lamart and 
Dr. Oliver, who were made Honorary members last 
year). 

Brother Larkworthy, who was one of the original 
members, resigned during the year. 

The medal was struck in London under the directions 
of one Mr. Shephard and arrived during this year and 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 59- 

the lodge passed three resolutions viz : (1) recording^ 
their entire approval and admiration of the medal and 
thanking Mr. Shephard (2) prescribing how and when 
it should be worn by the members of the lodge and the 
color of the ribbon and, (3) declaring that any brother 
initiated in the lodge should be invested with the medal, 
and the ribbon at the time of his reception, its cost 
being included in the initiation fees. 

The second resolution will be found printed at page 11 
of the existing bye-laws of the lodge as a note under 
bye-law 21. 

Amongst the visiting Brethren during the year are 
mentioned tjvo names, viz. Brother DeLastic Bernard of 
Bordeaux and Brother Shelly, who was Past Master of 
Lodge George William at Aden. 

A resolution was passed by the Provincial Grand Lodge 
on 24th November 1846, in the following terms: 

" That the Chapter and Rising Star ought to be allowed 
to have the free use of the Lodge Premises (the rent, 
servants' wages and expenses of lighting up, being 
borne by Lodge Perseverance ) and that for this accom- 
modation one half of their receipts from whatever source 
should be paid to Perseverance, it being distinctly 
understood that the moiety so payable was to be reduced 
to one third should the circumstances of either render 
that step necessary.'' This resolution was communicated 
to the Lodge by the Grand Secretary on the 30th Novem- 
ber following and accepted by it and also by Lodge Per- 
severance. It appears to have been passed for adjusting 
the financial obligations of the sister lodges and Royal 
Arch Chapter Perseverance, which met evidently in the 
same rooms at Mazagon. Itdoes not appear that the finan- 
cial position of the lodge was at the time good. Though the- 
treasurer's accounts for 1844 and 1845. were audited \>y a 
committee appointed for the purpose and passed during 
this year the state thereof is not recorded in the minutes.. 



'60 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

It would seem however that upto this time Lodge Rising 
Star was using the lodge rooms without any payment. 
The number of members at the close of the year was 76. 
'The lodge was financially worse off at the end of this 
year than it was at the end of 1845 ; for the disbursements 
were Rs. 879 while the receipts were only Rs- 340 and the 
debit balance of Rs. 152-13-0, was still unpaid to Brother 
Maneckjee Cursetjee, so that on the whole the lodge owed 
that Brother Rs. 691-13-0. But as the proceedings of 1851 
will show Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee was himself 
responsible for the ebb in the finances, as he was negli- 
gent in the recovery of dues during the time he was also 
Acting Treasurer in addition to being the Secretary of the 
lodge. 



CHAPTER V. 

1847 BROTHER Le-Geyt was reinstalled into the chair 
and was Worshipful Master for the second time in 1847. 
The minutes again show that the installation took place in 
the first degree- Only two meetings were held during 
that year, namely, on 30th March and 15th September 
and the latter was held in the new T Lodge Rooms " No. 5_ 
Grant's Bwildings, Colaba." Brother Gibbs of the Civil 
Service was elected as a joining member this year. 

1848 In the year 1848 there was neither increase nor 
decrease in the number of members and the meetings 
held were also only two. Brother LeGeyt having 
resigned Brother Lynch was at the first meeting held on 
3rd January, 1848, unanimously elected Right Worshipful 
Master for that year, and after he subscribed to the usual 
charges was installed into the Eastern Chair, and appoint- 
ed his Office-bearers (of whom Brother Maneckjee 
Cursetjee was again Secretary) who were all invested at 
the next meeting held on 3rd February, 1848. 

The fee for joining members was reduced from Rs. 50 
to Rs. 5. during this year, 

1849 In the year 1849, the lodge entered upon the 6th 
year of its existence. It appears that all the golden grain 
had been gathered by that time in the ten native 
Brethren including Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee admit- 
ted therein and the mead threatened to look bare as more 
native gentlemen of the 'class for whom the lodge was 
established were not forthcoming. The matter engaged 
the serious attention of the Brethren and the prosperity 
and continuance of the lodge were for the first time 
threatened and Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee and some of 



62 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the other Brethren thought that the crisis would be avert- 
ed by the lodge being empowered to admit Europeans 
.as well as Natives and being reconstructed on that 
basis. Right Worshipful Brother Dr. Burnes was ?hen 
again stationed in Bombay and taking advantage of that 
circumstance the Brethren at their very first meeting held 
-on 3rd January again unanimously elected him to be the 
Master (though he was under a previous resolution its 
Honorary Master ) in place of Brother Lynch, who 
evidently resigned the chair to him. It was at the same 
meeting that Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee brought 
forward certain resolutions for the reconstruction of the 
Lodge and establishing it on a sound basis. "They were 
seconded by the Right Worshipful Brother Lynch and 
were as follows : 

" That it being manifest that either the Lodge Rising 
.Star of Western India cease to exist on account of there 
being not eligible Native candidates to admit into 
it or be reconstructed on another principle than the 
.original one is so far as receiving only Natives therein it 
is proposed that the following resolution be adopted at 
-the next meeting of the lodge. 

Firstly. That the Right; Worshipful the Provincial 
-Grand Master under the conditions especially defined in 
our letter to his address of the llth December 1843, 
requesting him to establish the lodge be solicited to 
empower us to receive European as well as Native 
candidates for Masonry into our lodge. 

'Secondly. That the initiation passing and raising 
fees be reduced to one-half and that the joining fees be 
raised to one gold mohur or Rs. 15. 

Thirdly. That all the members of the Lodge Rising 
Star of Western India shall pay a monthly fee of Rs. 3. 
each under the penalty prescribed in its bye-laws. 

Fourthly. That tjfiese resolutions jbe communicated to 
all the members of the lodge with a request that they 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 63 

would come forward and assist in establishing the lodge 
on a firm basis." 

These resolutions were then circulated amongst the 
menfbers and brought before the lodge for discussion at 
the next meeting held on 4th September, but as they had 
not been previously notified in the circular convening the 
meeting the consideration thereof was postponed till the 
following meeting which was held on 15th September 
and at that meeting the lodge passed the resolution about 
reducing the initiation passing and raising fees by 
one-half and raising the joining fee to Rs. 15; but in 
regard to the reconstruction it resolved that under the 
circumstances of the case detailed by a reference to the 
proceedings of the meeting held on the 15th December 
1843 it was inexpedient to enter upon a consideration of 
the first resolution. 

The letter of llth December 1843 referred to in the 
first resolution is not available amongst the records of 
the Lodge. It may be however that the date of the 
letter was not correctly given therein, for the proceedings 
of the meeting of 15th December 1843, which have been 
.already mentioned refer only to the requisition of 19th 
November, 1843, made for the establishment of the lodge 
and the Provincial Grand Master's reply thereto of 1st 
December following and the warrant of dispensation 
dated 15th December 1843. The discussion is not given 
in the minutes nor is it stated that any member spoke on 
the resolution excepting the Right Worshipful Master 
Dr. Burnes. The lodge was established for the reception 
-of Natives only and the requisition of 19th November 
1843, had contained a pledge on the part of the members 
of Lodge Perseverance who had signed it that they would 
not initiate Europeans into it without the special sanction 
of the Provincial Grand Master and that pledge had 
evidently been accepted then and it is probable that it 
considered advisable to strictly adhere to it as upon 



64 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the faith thereof the warrant had been granted. It also 
does not apppear why the initiation passing and raising 
fees were reduced and the joining fees were raised; for 
no discussion thereon is recorded in the minutes. 1 The 
fees in the former case were not at all prohibitive; yet 
the reduction was resolved upon by one-half and that 
must have been probably with the object of throwing 
open the portals of the lodge on easier terms so far. For 
the first time therefore the total fee for the three 
degrees was fixed at Rs. 150 the joining fee was raised, 
from Rs. 5 toRs. 15; butitwasstilj kept at much less than 
the original fee which it will be remembered was Rs. 50. 

This year there was an increase of three'members, of 
whom one was a joining member and two were ordinary 
members so that the number of members on the roll at 
the end of the year was 79. 

The joining members was Brother Dr. James W.. 
Winchester, Provincial Grand Secretary of Western 
India, and the ordinary members were Bhugwandas 
Beeneram and Cawasji Sorabji Patel. 

The circumstances of the initiation of Bhugwandas 
Beneeram are rather interesting and show that though 
the lodge was in need of members yet it did not admit 
anybody even in such critical times except after the 
strictest scrutiny into his principles, faith and character 
and paid a rigid attention to quality not setting any 
value upon quantity alone. The candidate was a Hindoo- 
professing the Jain religion and belonged to the Dhondia 
sect amongst the Jains and was a partner in a big and 
respectable banking firm at Ahmudnagger in the Central 
Provinces. He was extremely anxious to become a Free- 
mason and had come all the way from there to Bombay 
at considerable expense for that purpose. It appears 
from a letter written to Brother Dr. Winchester by one 
Brother C. E. Anderson, of the " First Sweepers " Poona, 
that there was no native in any of the lodges existing in 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 65 

Poona, where the candidate first betook himself, and that 
the candidate was referred to him for advice in the 
matter. The candidate made an application in writing in 
Gujarati, a translation whereof is in the following terms: 
" To the Worshipful Master and officers and members 
of the Lodge 'Rising Star (of Western India) at 
Bombay. Written by, I, Bhugwandass Beeneeram the 
undersigned earnestly represent that there are three 
divisions of tribes of the Jains : Switambari, Digambari 
and Dhondia tribes and that I am a member of the 
Dhondia tribe. That we of the Dhondia faith have no 
relation of any kind soever with either the Hindu faith 
or their Shastras but that our belief on the contrary 
is quite opposed to them. That we Dhondias are even 
distinct from other divisions, Switambari and Digambari, 
of the Jains and observe none of their ceremonial forms 
and adorations of images. That we of Dhondia tribe 
save and except our Bhagwan (Supreme Being) the Lord 
of the Universe and all that appertains to the same, 
animated and inanimated, recognise none else. We neither 
worship nor adore any image or object of any kind 
soever under any circumstances. Nor in our Thanuk 
( place of worship ) walls we suffer any such thing to be 
worshipped or adored. Our Jutees ( priests ) when we 
gather in our Thanuk recite lectures on the good deeds 
of those who existed and departed from this world and 
descriptive of the moral code to guide us in our pursuits 
of life. From whatever our Jutees have explained to 
us we firmly believe that the Bhagwan who is the first 
cause of everything created and would create hundreds of 
millions of worlds and that we consider all the stars 
of the firmament to be as many worlds and that Bhagwan 
has so created them as by his wisdom of construction, 
they exist and perish and that none but He alone can 
comprehend the philosophy of such creation. That human 
beings are endowed with sense to know what is good a nd 



66 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

what is bad and that they will merit rewards and 
punishments in the world to come according to what 
they do in this. Believing in this we reckon all mankind 
to be equal and of one stock, be what their creed or oaste, 
and love others as we would regard our own selves and 
under any circumstances not to destroy or injure any 
toeings whether of human or brute creation. This is the 
sum total of our faith and to which I conscientiously 
adhere. That I am above the age of tw r enty-one years 
dependent on no one and feel fully desirous of being 
admitted into your assembly of Masons. I solicit this 
admission neither at the solicitation of any one nor under 
any improper idea of any worldly expectation but on 
the contrary from the knowledge of the favorable reports 
I have heard of your institution and a desire to obtain 
and prosecute knowledge and researches and that I will 
cheerfully conform to all the rules and regulations of 
your lodge. In witness thereof I subscribe my name 
on this 15th day of September 1849. 

Witness, BHUGWANDASS BEENEERAM. 
MANECKJEE CURSETJE<E, ESQR. 

The candidate had obtained certificates as to his res- 
pectability from Mr, F. Manisty, who was then the Civil 
Surgeon of Ahmednugar, and Captain J. W. Auld, who 
wals the Police Superintendent of that place and attached 
to the Bheel Corps, These certificates were forwarded 
through Brother H. Ellis of the Civil Service to Brother 
Dr. Winchester and were submitted by the latter to 
Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee for consideration and his 
view as to whetlher the candidate shonld be admitted into 
the order. 

Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee instituted independent 
inquiries into the qualifications of the candidate and 
obtained satisfactory replies from residents of Ahmed- 
nugar of his aquaintance. He was also satisfied from 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 67 

personal interviews he appears to have had with the 
.candidate that he was deserving of the honour he sought. 
He thereupon submitted all tftie papers tio the Right 
Worshipful Master Dr- Burnes together with a letter of 
.recommendation for the candidate's admission signed by 
three members of the lodge, viz: Ardeshir Cursetjee 
Wadia, Ali Akbar and Mahomed Jaffer. A meeting was 
then held on 15th November 1849 and the candidate's ap 
plication and all other papers were placed before it but as 
the majority of the native brethren were absent owing t<r 
the Mohurum, the final decision of the case was postponed 
to the 1st December following. The Right Worshipfu 
Master however expressed at the meeting his own 
opinion that having heard the candidate's declaration in 
which he had so clearly expressed his faith, which he, the 
Right Worshipful Master knew to be so totally different 
from Hindus, and the result of the strictest inquiry and 
scrutiny instituted into his moral character having 
proved satisfactory he would support the application. 

The adjourned meeting of the lodge was held on 1st 
December 1849 and Bhagwandas was unanimously elected 
by ballot and initiated. That was the last meeting of the 
year and also much to the regret of the brethren the last 
meeting at which Dr. Burnes presided over the lodge. 
He was then about to leave the country and the brethren 
unanimously passed, on the proposal of Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji, the following resolution: 

" That the lodge contemplates with unfeigned grief 
the approaching departure from India of our most 
esteemed Brother Burnes, the Right Worshipful Provin- 
cial Grand Master of Western India and the master 
and founder of this lodge, determines to record the deep 
.sense of the obligations the lodge and every member 
thereof collectively and individually owe him for all he 
did in his several capacities for the advancement! of 
the cause of Freemasonry in general and of the interest 



68 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

of this lodge in particular, with its sincerest wishes for 
his future health, happiness and success in life and 
resolves upon electing Brother Burnes its founder to be 
its Honorary Master for life, all the lodge rolls and 
returns being headed by his name." 

This was the last mark of respect and esteem of the 
lodge towards its worthy founder, a mark fully 
deserved. 

Brother Burnes thanked the lodge, and in doing so said 
the honour was peculiarly gratifying to his feelings as it 
maintained his name in connection with the lodge and 
that he would ever continue the deepest interest in the 
prosperity of the lodge which he took pride* in founding 
and which by its construction had practically demons- 
trated the principles of Freemasonry. 

In the minutes of this meeting is a copy of a letter 
addressed to the Secretary, Nilgiri Lodge, Ootacamund, 
on 5th November, 1849, by Brother Maneckji Cursetji as ; 
Secretary to the Provincial Grand Master for native 
correspondence and Senior Warden of the lodge, on the 
subject of the proposed admission of a Parsee into the 
Order. It is a short letter but its value consists in the 
enunciation of the strict and noble principles followed by 
the lodge. (Vide Appendix C.) 



CHAPTER VI. 

1 850. In the year 1850 four meetings were held of 
-which one was an emergent meeting, and there were two 
initiations and one passing. There was an addition also 
of three members against the loss of two whose names 
were struck out for default in payment of their sub- 
scriptions, and one of whom had also died. 

The three new members were Moosa Khan, assistant 
moonshi to the Persian Secretary to Government ( who 
was an initiate) and Brothers Musgrave and Harrison, 
who were joining members. 

Brother Barr w r as the Right Worshipful Master during 
the year and Brother Maneckji Cursetji was again the 
Senior Warden. The new master was elected and install- 
ed at the first meeting held on 8th January 1850, and the 
office-bearers of the year were also nominated by him at 
the same meeting. For the first time mention is made 
in the minutes of that meeting of an official visit by the 
Provincial Grand Lodge. 

The accounts of the lodge had, it appears, been careless- 
ly kept and were in a confused state and had been 
examined by a committee of four members and their 
report was that Brother Maneckji Cursetji had expended 
out of his own pocket a sum of Rs. 619 over and above the 
receipts that had come to his hands as acting Treasurer 
during the year 1844 to 1&50, and that as against that 
sum there were outstanding dues of the amount of 
Rs, 333 which still left a balance of Rs. 386 due to 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji and that that Brother had 
Idndly agreed to give up the balance to close the accounts. 



70 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

It has already been seen that at the end of the year 
1846 the lodge owed Brother Maneckji Cursetji 
Es. 591-13-0. There were no receipts in 1847 and 1848 
while those in 1849 and 1850 amounted to Rs. 300. ""The 
disbursements during the years 1847, 1848, 1849 and 1850 
were Rs. 227-10-2, so that at the end of 1850 the debit 
balance was Rs. 619. 

It was also stated in the report that as the lodge 
had scarcely worked during the preceding two years 
and as no particular expenses had been incurred 
the members had not paid their subscriptions for 
those years, they not having been called upon to- 
do so. 

1851. In 1851 the number of members increased by 
five, being one joining member and four initiates. During 
the year, only three meetings were held including the 
anniversary meeting held on St. John's Day. The 
joining member was a Brother named Marcus Joseph 
and the initiates were Mirza Hoosan Khan (Persian 
Consul in Bombay) and Mahomed Saduck, and Haji 
Mehedy Shirazi (two leading Persian Mogul merchants) 
and Maneckjee Limjee Anteria, assistant to Messrs. 
Jehangir Nusserwanjee & Co. 

At the very first meeting Brother Blowers was elected 
Right Worshipful Master and he reappointed and con- 
firmed as his office-bearers the brethren who had held 
office during the preceding year. Evidently there being 
no work the next meeting was held on 16th December 
1851, and at that meeting Brother Lynch was elected 
master for the ensuing year. The financial condition of 
the lodge had, it appears become very unsatisfactory by 
this time and Brother Maneckji Cursetji with the object 
of preventing a recurrence of any loss and placing the 
lodge on a safe and sure footing read at the meeting of 
16th December 1851 a memorandum referring to the- 
state of the accounts and embodying the following 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 71 

propositions for the better government of the lodge in 
future : 

' ' That from and after the ensuing St. John's Day, the 
27thinstant, Section XXIII of the By-laws shall remain 
as originally adopted on 15th November* 1844, and not 
as subsequently altered or amended on the 15th 
September, 1849, or, in other words, the fees payable to 
the lodge shall be as follows : 

For Initiation ... Rupees two hundred. 

Second degree ... Rupees forty. 
Third degree . . . Rupees sixty. 
Joinings ... Rupees fifty. 

" The Treasurer's receipt acknowledging the same must 
accompany the declaration as voucher previous to the 
candidate being initiated, passed or raised." 

"That Section XXIV of the By-laws be altered or 
amended as follows: 

" Every member initiated, passed or raised in the lodge 
shall have the option either of paying four rupees a 
month for three years or a sum of rupees one hundred 
as contribution to entitle him to become a life-member 
of the lodge witout the payment of any such subscrip- 
tion. 

" That every joining member subscribing to no other 
lodge in Bombay shall either pay a monthly subscrip- 
tion of rupees two for three years or a sum of rupees 
fifty as composition, whilst every member subscribing 
to any other lodge in Bombay shall pay one rupee a 
month for 3 years or a sum of rupees twenty-five as 
composition to entitle him to become a life-member 
of the lodge. 

u That the original and affiliated members of the lodge 
should be exempted from the above rules and that other 
members who refuse to act up to one or the other of the 
above propositions shall cease to be borne on the lodge 
rolls." 



72 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The proposition was seconded by Right Worshipful 
Brother Le Geyt, who was then the Provincial Grand 
Master of Western India, and left over to be considered 
at the next meeting. 

On 27th December, St. John's Day, the next meeting 
was held, and the Master-elect, Brother Lynch, was duly 
installed in the chair, and delivered an address in Persian 
explaining the working tools appertaining to the first 
degree. The four new members were also all balloted for 
and electsd and initiated on the same night. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetjee's proposition was then 
brought on, discussed and approved of. 

An unpleasant incident, which threatened to disturb the 
harmony subsisting between the lodge and Lodge Perseve- 
rance, happened about this time; and was evidently due to 
a misunderstanding on the part of Lodge Perseverance. 

The communications of the lodge were usually dated and 
its meetings were summoned to be held at the Lodge 
Rooms, Colaba, and in consonance with that practice 
Brother Maneckji Cursetjee, who was then officiating 
Secretary in addition to being Senior Warden, had issued 
a circular, dated 20th December, 1851, dated at and con- 
vening the anniversary meeting of 27th December at the 
Lodge Rooms, and this circular had, as usual, been sent to 
Lodge Perseverance for its information, and had come to 
the knowledge of its Master, Right Worshipful Brother 
C. Ashburner, who thought that Brother Maneckji 
Cursetjee had no authority to so date the communication 
and summon the meeting without his consent and 
previous communication to him. 

It appears that the matter was discussed personally 
between Brother Maneckji Cursetjee and Brother 
Ashburner, and the latter was informed of the resolution 
which was passed by the Provincial Grand Lodge on 24th 
November 1846, whereby the lodge was to have the use 
of the Lodge Rooms and was not to pay anything for rent 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 73 

^servants' wages and lighting expenses, which were all to 
Ibe paid by Lodge Perseverance, and for that accommoda- 
tion was to pay a moiety of all receipts to Lodge 
Perseverance, but Brother Ashburner was not aware of 
the same. The Lodge Rooms were also then under repairs, 
.and Lodge Perseverance intended to hold a ball there on 
or about the 7th or 12th January, which, of course, was 
.not a masonic purpose. 

Further, it appears that Lodge Perseverance had not 
.received fees from this lodge since the year 1848, and 
Rising Star had not been paid its share in a sum of 
Bupees five hundred which had been left by the Mar- 
<quis of Dalhousie, the Governor-General of India ( while 
liis Lordship was in Bombay in the year 1850) in the 
hands of Lodge Perseverance for distribution amongst 
ithe lodges in Bombay for charitable purposes, and those 
.circumstances the Master of Lodge Perseverance thought 
.showed that the Lodge Rising Star was defunct. The 
points required further discussion, but as the anniversary 
meeting was to come off on the 27th December, and the 
(Objection was not withdrawn, Brother Maneckji Cursetjee 
amended the circular of 20th December 1851, by adding 
a postscript dated 24th December 1851 stating that 
.under the circumstances to be brought tlo the notice of, 
and to be discussed by the lodge the anniversary meet- 
ing would be held at Brother AH Akbar Khan's Babula 
Tank House instead of at the Lodge Rooms. 

Besides the personal discussion there was official corres- 
pondence between the Secretary of Lodge Perseverance 
and Brother Maneckji Cursetjee and the masters of 
both the lodges. 

The Secretary of Lodge Perseverance, Brother W. M. 
Ellis, had addressed a letter t>o Brother Maneckji Cur- 
setjee, inquiring why the communications were dated and 
(the meetings summoned at the Lodge Rooms, and Brother 
Maneckji Cursetjee replied pointing out that the lodge 



74 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

and Lodge Perseverance were both working under the 
same authority and in the same rooms, where tftiey had 
severally their warrants deposited and hanging up in 
frames, and that since the establishment of the ledge 
no previous consent had ever been obtained, or had been 
considered necessary to be obtained, from the Worshipful 
Master of Lodge Perseverance, and that all that was 
necessary to be done was for the Secretary of the lodge 
to intimate to the Secretary of Lodge Perseverance the 
date and time of its meetings. 

He also enclosed a copy of the correspondence and 
resolutions passed by and between the lodge and Lodge 
Perseverance and the Provincial Grand Lodge, and added 
that the privilege of holding its meetings in the Lodge 
Rooms had not been accorded to the lodge as a favour or 
without any consideration, for the furniture in the Lodge 
Rooms had been paid for by the three lodges in certain 
proportions, and the proportion of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India was by far the larger of them, that up to 
1847 the lodge had paid its quota of rent and expenses, 
that since then it had little or no work and met but once 
or so a year at daytime and not at night for form sake, 
and not having been called upon to pay had not under 
the circumstances paid anything to Lodge Perseverance r 
and that the decorations in the Lodge Rooms were the 
personal property of Righ't Worshipful Brother Dr. 
Burnes, who had presented same on his departure for the 
use of the Provincial Grand Lodge, Lodge Perseverance,- 
and Lodge Rising Star, and of the Chapter. 

Four candidates had then been already proposed, and 
Brother Maneckji Cursetjee intimated in his reply that 
should they be elected and initiated at the anniversary 
meeting, Lodge Perseverance would, as a matter of right, 
get half of the fees amounting to rupees four hundred, 
and that for a day's use of the rooms, and last, though 
not the least, Brother Maneckji Cursetjee expressed his 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 75 

certain belief that harmonious feelings subsisted between 
the two lodges. 

The personal discussion and correspondence were not 
without the desired effect, for within a fortnight or so 
the objection was waived, and the Master of Lodge 
Perseverance wrote to the Master of Lodge Rising Star, 
Brother H. B. Lynch, intimating that he and his lodge 
were very desirous of preserving the friendly relations 
which had existed heretofore between the two lodges, 
and in order to avert the possibility of being ever again 
disappointed in obtaining the use .of the Lodge Rooms, 
suggested the propriety of the master of the lodge 
fixing on the days of meetings in previous communication, 
with himself or the master for the time being of Lodge 
Perseverance, so that the two lodges might not each fix 
the same evening for its meetings, and he also adverted 
to the fact that connected in an intimate degree with the 
cordial reciprocal good understanding between the 
members of the two lodges was that of several of the 
brethren of Lodge Rising Star being ex officio extra 
members of Lodge Perseverence and vice versa, and in 
order that the resolution of 3rd March, 1845, might be 
acted upon in future he asked for a list of the members 
of the lodge on the rolls at that date. He also offered 
to pay to the lodge its proper share, viz., one-third or one- 
half of the sum of rupess five hundred left by Lord 
Dalhousie which he said would be divided in due 
proportions between the lodge, Lodge Perseverance, and 
Lodge St. George (which had already been constituted 
under the English jurisdiction, on 18th May, 1848 ) and 
asked for a moiety of all receipts of the lodge since the 
last payment made by it. Brother Lynch replied in 
suitable terms, and the lodge in due course paid on 
22nd March, 1852, what was due to Lodge Perseverance 
according to the accounts after taking credit for its 
proportion of the said sum of rupees five hundred. 



76 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

A copy of the correspondence is set out in Appen- 
dix D. 

Some letters in addition to those recorded had passed 
and Lodge Perseverance had made a claim which 2he 
lodge thought was not sustainable, and it still engaged 
the attention of the lodge, and it will be seen was in the 
next year discussed in a thorough manner. 



CHAPTER VII. 

1852 The next year was an eventful one, and the- 
subjects that were brought up in the first few meetings 
related to the financial condition of the lodge and the 
differences with Lodge Perseverance. During the year 
twelve meetings were held, including the installation 
meeting and three extra meetings. 

The first meeting was held on 15th January 1852 at 
Brother Maneckji Cursetjee's " Byculla Villa," and the 
correspondence that had passed by that time between the 
lodge and Lodge Perseverance, regarding the use of the 
Lodge Rooms, was read and considered thereat, and two- 
resolutions were passed as follows: 

" That the meeting observed with regret the existing- 
differences between the two lodges which appear to 
have been based upon a misunderstanding on the part 
of Perseverance and is easy of settlement. 

" That there being no fund belonging to the lodge in: 
hand, the lodge being still in debt to Brother officiating 
Treasurer for the past year, and though the Lodge Per- 
severance could have no claim, justly speaking, to a 
moiety of the receipts of the four initiations on the 
27th ultimo, when the ceremony thereof took place at 
other than the Lodge Rooms, the use of which Perse- 
verance refused to allow, it being occupied by that body 
for other than masonic purposes, yet Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji in order to obviate the difficulties proposed to* 
give up his claim on the existing fund of the lodge, to 
allow of a moiety thereof being handed over to Perseve- 
rance." 



78 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The lodge thanked Brother Maneckji Cursetjee for 
his generous offer to accommodate the differences and 
recorded its appreciation of the same. 

After these resolutions were passed Brother Maneckji 
Cursetjee closed the matter as stated above. 

At this meeting a question was raised by Brother 
Wellis as to the legality or otherwise of admitting 
members on payment of a composition money or without 
. any payment at all, as resolved upon at the last meeting, 
and suggested that sections 13 and 14 of the By-laws 
should be so amended as to bind the lodge in the 
spirit of masonic constitution, and that the subject 
should be reconsidered at the next meeting, and con- 
sequently the proceedings of the last convocation were 
confirmed but with the exception suggested. 

An extra meeting was then held on 8th March in a 
"room above the Post Office/' and at that meeting a 
committee consisting of the Right Worshipful Master 
and Brothers Barr, Blowers, Wellis, and Maneckji 
Cursetjee, was appointed to ascertain and report to the 
members generally the exact position the lodge was then 
in, in respect to its working and paying members, and 
whether circumstances had occurred to render any alter- 
ation in its By-laws or rules expedient, and to offer 
such suggestions as the committee might think advisable 
for the good of the lodge. This committee (which had on 
it two members who were then past masters of Lodge. 
Perseverance) resolved that as Lodge Perseverance had 
apparently lost sight of the compact, which was entered 
into between the two lodges at the suggestion of the late 
and the then Provincial Grand Masters, the lodge should 
thenceforth be under no restriction as to the admission of 
Europeans as well as Natives to the benefit of the Craft, 
subject to its fundamental rules as laid down in the 
constitution, and that with that view it was expedient to 
reconstruct the lodge upon an amended principle to what 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 79 

it originally was intended, and they recommended that 
the resolution passed at the meeting of 27th December, 
1851, and not confirmed at the meeting of 15th January, 
1850, be not confirmed, and that instead of meeting once 
in two months the lodge should hold regular monthly 
meetings, or as often otherwise as circumstances would 
render it necessary, and that the fees should be reduced to 
rupees seventy-five for initiation, rupees twenty for 
passing, rupees thirty for raising, rupees fiften for 
joining and rupees three for monthly subscription for 
every member except the original ones, if they be 
subscribing members to any other lodge. 

They also recommended that the report should be cir- 
culated amongst the members and that new By-laws or 
modifications in the existing By-laws should be prepared 
.and submitted to a general meet-ing after they were in 
possession of the views of a majority, if not of all the 
members, to support the lodge on the principle contained 
in the report. 

On the 27th March the third regular meeting was held 
at the Lodge Rooms, as by 22nd March, 1852, the differ- 
ences between the lodge and Lodge Perseverance had been 
almost adjusted and a Brother named Martin Boyce was 
elected a joining member. He was balloted for and 
elected the master of the lodge in place of Brother Lynch, 
who it appears had to leave Bombay on duty and had 
resigned, and was duly installed thereat in the chair and 
appointed and invest'ed his office-bearers for the year. 

Two other Brothers, namely Brothers Rowland Hamil- 
ton, and M. O'Meally, were also elected joining members, 
at this meeting, and the latter was appointed Inner Guard 
for the year. Brother Maneckji Cursetjee was again 
appointed Secretary of the lodge, and was now the only 
Native member holding office. 

The report of the committee already referred to, as also 
.a draft of the new By-laws stated in the minutes to have 



80 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

been prepared, were submitted at the meeting, and after- 
discussion and deliberation were fully approved and una- 
nimously passed for the future government of the lodge. 
The meeting also appointed a finance committee in 
addition to appointing a Treasurer, for better control over 
the receipts and expenditure, and that the financial condi- 
tion of the lodge might not again suffer. 

Lodge Perseverance had, it appears, rescinded about 
this time the resolution it had passed on 3rd March, 
1845, and resolved that members of Lodge Rising Star 
wishing to join that lodge, must be balloted for and pay 
the joining fee. 

The differences between the two lodges and the claims- 
preferred by Lodge 'Perseverence had not then been finally 
adjusted, and the abrogation of the resolution of 3rd 
March 1845, in the then state of circumstances, appears 
to have caused dissatisfaction to the lodge. 

A letter from the Right Worshipful Master of Lodge 
Perseverance was read at this meeting of 20th April, 1852,. 
in continuation of the correspondence previously recorded, 
and a committee was appointed of the Right Worshipful 
Master, and Senior and Junior Wardens and Senior 
Deacon and Secretary with power to add to their number 
to inquire into and report on all matters touching the 
misunderstanding existing between the two lodges with 
a view to the same being honourably adjusted. 

This special committee considered the whole, corres- 
pondence that had passed between the Worshipful 
Masters and Secretaries of both lodges, and submitted 
their report to an extraordinary meeting of the lodge- 
held on 10th May 1852. 

It is stated in the report that the committee greatly 
regretted that the Worshipful Master of Lodge Per- 
severance should have thought it necessary to address- 
such a letter to the Worshipful Master of the Lodge 
Rising Star as the one dated 30th January, 1852 (which 



OF WESTERN INDIA Xo. S42 S.C. 81 

is not available) which from the tone and spirit they 
trusted had not been written with the concurrence and 
approbation of the brethren of Perseverance in lodge 
assembled, and that they considered the reply thereto as 
characterised throughout by the mild and truly masonic 
feeling which should always mark communications, per- 
sonal or otherwise, between members of the Craft and 
especially between the masters of the different lodges, 
.and expressed their opinion that the Right Worshipful 
Brother Boyce had taken a fair and just view of the 
claims of Lodge Perseverance, and that the financial 
. result shown in his letter was quite correct, and express- 
ed their concurrence with and approval of his said 
letter. 

As regards the future course of the lodge, the Com- 
mittee were of opinion that as the payments of Lodge Ris- 
ing Star of half its receipts to Lodge Perseverance, under 
the resolution of the Provincial Grand Lodge, were wholly 
disproportionate to the accommodation and benefit receiv- 
ed by her for one or at most two nights in the month of 
the lodge rooms and paraphernalia (the proprietary right 
in which, however, was vested in the two lodges, and the 
Provincial Grand Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter ) and 
as the effect of the resolution was to divert in fact the 
greatest portion of her funds into the treasury of Lodge 
Perseverance and to benefit Lodge Perseverance at the 
expense of Lodge Rising Star, which could not have been 
the desire of either the Provincial Grand Lodge or of 
Lodge Perseverance, the said resolution should be modi- 
fied, and that an immediate application should be made 
to the Provincial Grand Master for that purpose, and 
recommended that an arrangement should be placed 
before the Provincial Grand Lodge and Lodge Persever- 
ance for their consideration on the basis that the lodge 
should continue to have the use of the lodge rooms, 
furniture and refreshment kit, and in consideration of 

G 



82 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

such accommodation should pay such rent and cost of 
establishment as may be determined upon by the 
Provincial Grand Lodge and Lodge Perseverance, in 
addition to a monthly allowance for the use of the t kit 
and all expenses attending its meetings on account of 
lights, extra servants and refreshments, and that a 
Committee consisting of two members of both bodies 
should be appointed to settle the matter with one officer 
of the Grand Lodge as Umpire or President. 

Adverting to the abrogation by Lodge Perseverance of 
its resolution of 3rd March 1845, and the new resolution 
passed by Lodge Perseverance under which any member 
of this lodge desiring to join it was required to be 
balloted for and to pay a joining fee, the Committee in 
their report expressed their regret that that should have 
been done, and recommended that as both lodges were 
bonded together for the promotion of the best interests 
of Freemasonry in India, and the good feeling which the 
lodge had always had for Lodge Perseverance still existed, 
the privilege which the lodge, by its resolution also of 
3rd March 1845 had accorded to the brethren of Lodge 
Perseverance, should be continued and remain in full 
force. 

The report was signed by Brothers Blowers, Wellis, 
Kingston, M. O'Meally and Maneckji Cursetjee. 

The extraordinary meeting approved of the report and 
unanimously adopted it, and resolved that the suggestions 
therein made should be submitted to the Provincial Grand 
Master and that a copy of same should be forwarded to 
the master and brethren of Lodge Perseverance- (For a 
copy of the Report vide Appendix E.) 

Right Worshipful Brother Boyce, who during his short 
tenure of office had taken up so warmly the cause of the 
lodge, and asserted its position and claims with prompti- 
tude and firmness, and had endeared himself to the 
brethren, wa!s just then about to go to England for a 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 83 

short time, and had given out his intention in that behalf 
at a meeting of the lodge held on 20th May, 1852. The 
brethren were not slow in appreciating his worth and 
services, for at the same meeting they passed an 
unanimous resolution expressing the regret of the lodge 
at his absence, though for a short time, and its sincere 
gratitude for his attention and zeal in taking an active 
part in advancing its interests and prosperity, and its 
best wishes for his speedy return. 

Brother Blowers was also at the same meeting un- 
animously elected by ballot to be the officiating master 
during the absence of Brother Boyce, and he appointed 
his office-bearers, amongst whom Brother Maneckji Curset- 
jee was again given the post of Secretary. 

The Committee's suggestions must have been placed 
before the Provincial Grand Lodge and Lodge Persever- 
ance, and it appears a letter was then addressed by the 
Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance to the Wor- 
shipful Master of this lodge, which was considered far 
from satisfactory, for an extraordinary meeting of the 
lodge was held again in "a room above the post-office " 
on 9th June at which the following three resolutions 
were unanimously passed : 

"1. That the question in dispute between the Lodges 
Perseverance and Rising Star of Western India, regard- 
ing the claims advanced by the former, having already 
been referred to the Right Worshipful the Provincial 
Grand Master, under resolution of this lodge of the 10th 
May last, the letter from the Worshipful Master of Per- 
severance just read be transmitted to the Secretary, 
Provincial Grand Lodge, together with the extract of this 
day's proceedings as supplemental to the correspondence 
already laid before that authority. 

"2. That the brethren of Lodge Rising Star do ex- 
tremely regret the tone of the communication addressed 
by the Worshipful Master of Perseverance to the Wor~ 



84 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

shipf ul Master of Rising Star, and as such a style as that 
adopted by the former is greatly to be deprecated, and 
as it is desirable to prevent future misunderstanding, 
the brethren resolve to discontinue the use of the rooms 
of Lodge Perseverance. 

" 3. That an application be made to the Worshipful 
Master of Lodge Perseverance to deliver up such articles 
of furniture as might be found to belong to Rising Star 
and that Brothers Berry, O'Mealy and Maneckji Curset- 
jee be appointed a Committee to act in conjunction with 
such brethren of Perseverance as might be appointed by 
that lodge to settle this point/' 

The next meeting, which was held on 7th August, was 
held at the residence of Brother Maneckji Cursetjee and 
at that meeting a Committee consisting of that Brother 
and Brothers Smith and Harrington was appointed to 
purchase the necessary kit and furniture of the lodge, 
and Brother Cross was authorised to print the new Bye- 
laws of the lodge. 

An incident occurred during this year which concern- 
ed Brother Blowers and Lodge Perseverance. As that 
Brother was, however, the officiating master of this lodge, 
it was not allowed to pass unnoticed, but was mentioned 
at a meeting of the lodge held on 20th August, 1852, and a 
resolution was passed thereon. 

Brother Blowers had been the Worshipful Master of 
Lodge Perseverance in the years 1845, 1848, and 1850, 
and on his vacating the chair in the last mentioned year 
some of the brethren of that lodge had determined to mark 
their sense of gratitude to him for his long-continued 
exertions in the cause of Masonry, and especially as 
connected with that lodge, by presenting to him a jewel 
and an address engrossed on vellum. The address bore 
the names of those who had joined together to present it, 
and foremost among them was the name of Brother 
Ashburner, who was then the Master of Lodge Persever- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 85 

ance, and had been presented to Brother Blowers on the 
12th February, 1852, but shortly before presentation it 
had got soiled, and at the request of Brother Ashburner 
and another member of Lodge Perseverance, had been 
returned to them for being engrossed on a fresh sheet of 
vellum, and afterwards signed by the brethren who had 
signed it originally, but though repeatedly applied for it 
was not returned to Brother Blowers till 13th August, 
1852, when, to his great astonishment and regret, he 
found that Brother Ashburner's name had been scored 
out with a pen. 

Brother Barr, who was the Past Master of the 
lodge and also a Past Master of Lodge Perseverance, was 
present at the lodge meeting of 20th August, 1852, and 
he said he wanted to mention the matter, whereupon Bro- 
ther Blowers vacated the chair temporarily and invested 
him with the Master's jewel and installed him and with- 
drew from the meeting. Brother Barr then narrated all 
the circumstances stating that he felt himself bound to 
do so in justice to Brother Blowers, who was then pre- 
siding over the lodge with a view to obtain from them an 
expression of their opinion as to what course that worthy 
Brother should adopt in the matter, and added that as it 
might be invidious either in the lodge or Brother Blow- 
ers to attach the blame of the act that had been com- 
mitted to any individual, the best and the most masonic 
course in his opinion was for the lodge to express its 
sympathy with Brother Blowers, and to strongly urge 
upon him the necessity of laying the matter before the 
Provincial Grand Lodge with a view to its being properly 
investigated into by that body, and such ulterior steps 
being taken as the Provincial Grand Master and officers 
and members of the Grand Lodge might deem proper, 
and the lodge then passed by acclamation a resolution to 
that effect, after which Brother Blowers returned to the 
lodge, and on being informed of what had taken place 



86 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

thanked the brethren and expressed his determination 
to follow the advice given to him. 

At the meeting held on 21st September, 1852, Brother 
Blowers announced that Brother Ashburner having 
written to him a letter expressing his regret that in a 
moment of excitement he had erased his signature to the 
address and offering his sincere apology for the act, he 
had relinquished his intention of appealing to the Pro- 
vincial Grand Lodge. (Brother Ashburner's letter is set 
out in Appendix F.) 

Another incident which directly concerned the two 
lodges is also recorded in the minutes of the same meet- 
ing. Lodge Perseverance had contemplated initiating a 
Native gentleman residing in Bombay. The officiating 
Right Worshipful Master thought that such a pro- 
cedure was contrary to the mutual understanding 
arrived at between the two lodges, when the lodge was 
founded expressly for the purpose of initiating Native 
candidates whose character Lodge Perseverance had not 
the same means of scrutinising so as to prevent the 
admission of unworthy men, and on his proposition 
seconded by Brother Maneckji Cursetjee, the lodge 
passed a resolution that a suitable letter be addressed to 
the Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance requesting 
him in the event of his persisting in the initiation to 
defer doing so until the decision of the Grand Lodge 
could be obtained. The minutes do not contain any 
further allusion to this matter. 

At this meeting the lodge also resolved on the proposal 
of the Worshipful Master, seconded by the Provincial 
Grand Master, who was present thereat, to hire certain 
apartments in " Grants Buildings " then about to be va- 
cated by Brother Barr in conjunction with the Royal Arch 
Chapter, as they were well adapted for Masonic purposes. 

During this year there was an increase of 24 members, 
of whom four were initiates, 19 joining members and one 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 87 

honorary member. The four initiates were Aga Mahomed 
Tuckee, Sorabji Hormusji Mehta, Dinshaw Dorabji Mehta 
and Ardeshir Jamsetji Bhaji walla. The joining members 
were Brothers Martin Boyce, Michael O'Meally, Rowland 
Hamilton, Professor Richard Tevhill Reed, James Jack- 
son, David Campbell, J. Cross, J. Casterton, J. Dewey, 
J. D. Smith (all of Lodge Perseverance), J. W. West, R. J. 
Morris, Aratoon Jordan, H. Legett, John Brown, H. 0. 
Flower, Ebenezer Nash, G. R. Ballingall and A. B. Leech. 
The honorary member was again a French nobleman of 
the name of Viscount De Brons Cezerac, hailing from the 
Lodge L'Anglaise St. John No. 204 , Bordeaux, France, 
established at Bordeaux in 1732. He was elected hon- 
orary member at the meeting of 21st September, 185'2, 
but before he was so elected an interesting ceremony had 
taken place. He delivered a speech (which was trans- 
lated by a Brother named A. G. Roussac) in which he 
said he had been commissioned by his lodge to present 
Brother Blowers, Past Master of Lodge Perseverance and 
substitute-Master of Lodge Rising Star, with a master 
mason's jewel accompanied by a diploma conferring 
upon him the title of honorary member of that vener- 
able lodge in return for masonic hospitality shown by 
him to numbers of French Freemasons visiting Bombay 
during the long period of 23 years, during which he was 
connected with Lodge Perseverance and a great portion 
of that time as master of that lodge. ( Vide Appendix G. 
which sets out the address.) 

The honour conferred was suitably acknowledged by 
the recipient thereof, and after that Viscount Brons 
was enrolled as an honorary member by acclamation. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



1853. -The year 1853, on the whole, passed off better 
than the previous one. In all thirteen meetings were 
held, of which three were emergent meetings and were 
convened for working off arrears of work. There was an 
increase of 28 members, being 11 initiates and 17 affiliate- 
and joining members; against this increase there was one 
death and three resignations, of which, ho\vever, one did 
not count, as it was of Brother W. M. Wellis, one of the 
founders of the lodge, who, in consideration of that cir- 
cumstance and also of the zeal he had throughout his 
membership and his holding offices in the lodge, evinced 
to promote its best interests was upon his resignation 
elected an honorary member by a special resolution 
recording the appreciation by the lodge of his services 
and help. 

The new initiated members were Meer Jafferalikhan 
Bahadur, Merwanjee Maneckjee Sett, Aga Syed Hoosein. 
Nusserwanjee Bomonjee, Merwanjee Heerjibhoy Patell, 
Sorabjee Heerjibhoy, P. A. Rodrigues. Cawasjee Hirji- 
bhoy, A.P, Oarvalho, Nowrosjee Nanabhoy Framjee and 
Eduljee Pestonjee. Brother Rodrigues was the first 
Christian member, not a European, initiated in the 
lodge followed by Brother Carvalho. Brother Sorabjee 
Heerjibhoy was elected after three ballots were taken. It 
appears that he was first balloted for at a meeting held 
on 21st January, when, on the result being found unfavour- 
able, Brother Wellis being of opinion that black balls 
against him were put in by mistake, the ballot was gone 
over again and proved favourable. Then the Secretary 



RISING STAR OF W. /., No. 342 S. C. 89- 

brought to the notice of the Worshipful Senior Warden 
who was presiding over the lodge a feeling against the can- 
didate manifested by some of the brethren, and thereupon 
a third ballot was taken which proved unfavourable. 
Then at the next meeting held on 21st February it was 
stated to the Worshipful Senior Warden by Brother 
O'Meally that Brother Sorabjee Hormusjee, who was then 
acting as Outer Guard, had influenced some brethren to 
black ball Brother Sorabjee Heerjibhoy under the im- 
pression that he was unworthy of admission, and that he 
seemed anxious to have him again brought to the ballot. 
Brother Sorabjee Hormusjee was then called to the 
pedestal to explain his inconsistent conduct, and he 
stated that he had been moved to thwart Brother Sorab- 
jee's entrance pending the consent of his parents, whose 
feelings, he said, were held in the lodge as worthy of 
being consulted and for no other reason. Consequent 
upon that explanation Brother Sorabjee Heerjibhoy was 
again balloted for and unanimously elected. 

The joining members and affiliates were Brothers J. V. 
Vinay, Henry Conybeare, Parry Jones, J. G. Mitchell, 
Frederick Darby, James King, G. F. Remington, Mac- 
kenzie, W. M. Ellis, L. Kobs, Francis Clough, Richard 
Newby, Edgar Whittaker, W. H. S. Crawford and G. 
Volkart (all of Lodge Perseverance) and Anthony Gar- 
jola of Lodge St. Andrews in the East and Brother A. G. 
Rousacc. 

Brothers Garjola and Rousac were subsequently passed 
and raised in the lodge. 

A gentleman of the name of Edward Trench was pro- 
posed for initiation, but Ithe proposal was withdrawn 
upon the decision of the Grand Lodge restricting initia- 
tion in the lodge to Natives only. 

During this year a resolution was passed by the lodge 
which provided that, in addition to the entrance fee of 
rupees five paid on affiliation, those members of Lodge 



90 HISTORY* OF LODGE R!S^ 7 G ST^R 

Perseverance who were origiDal members thereof would 
be liable to pay from 1st March, 1853>, a monthly sub- 
scription of one rupee. 

The custom of sending to the Secretary of the Lodge 
Perseverance the summons convening the lodge meetings 
had not been observed then for some time past, and on 
the matter being mentioned at a meeting held on 18th 
April it was unanimously resolved to revive that old and 
good custom, and at a subsequent meeting were recorded a 
letter from the Secretary of the lodge to the Secretary of 
Lodge Perseverance requesting an interchange of circu- 
lars and expressive of the desire of the members of the 
lodge to receive those of Lodge Perseverance at their 
banquet at all times, and a letter in reply from the 
Secretary of that lodge accepting the cordial invitation 
and reciprocating the same. These were undoubtedly 
desirable steps on the part of both lodges towards 
maintaining harmony and peaceful relations, which dur- 
ing the preceding years were somewhat unfortunately 
disturbed. 

But while the relations between the two lodges were 
smooth those between the members of the lodge 
themselves were a little disturbed, and in consequence of 
an unfortunate misunderstanding on the part of some 
members a charge was laid against Brother Maneckji 
Cursetjee and was investigated into by a Committee 
specially appointed for the purpose. 

It appears that one Mr. Rustomjee Merwanjee was 
brought to the ballot but the result was unfavourable, and 
as soon as it was known Brother Maneckji Gursetji 
addressed the lodge saying he had been charged in 
conversation with some brother (whose name he did not 
give) with having attempted to form a clique in the lodge 
against the rejected candidate, and proceeded to deny 
and defend himself against the charge. Brother Cross then 
opposed Brother Maneckji Cursetjee and said he 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 91 

undertook to prove the charge. Thereupon a Committee 
consisting of Brothers Balingall, the Worshipful Senior 
Warden, and Brothers Allen, Ellis, Dinshaw Dorabjee 
and Mahomed Saduck was appointed under Bye-law 
36 to investigate the charge. The Committee subsequent- 
ly made a report showing that the charge arose out of a 
misconception of Brother Maneckji Cursetjee's views 
by the Brother upon whose information Brother Cross 
had acted, and this report was read to the lodge 
meeting subsequently held. The report of the Committee, 
it is satisfactory to note, cleared the aggrieved Brother's 
character and under the said Bye-law 36 was the final 
decision in the matter. 

After this rather unpleasant incident complete harmony 
does not seem to have prevailed again in the lodge, for at 
the last meeting held on 20th December 1853, one Mr. 
Muncherjee Shapurjee Mehta, proposed for initiation, and 
three brothers named E. Roussac, Evans, and Lauchlam 
proposed for affiliation, were rejected on the ballot. The 
ballot for the three brethren was taken collectively, but 
four black balls appearing the lodge resolved to suspend 
the individual balloting of these Brothers pending the 
decision of a question which the Right Worshipful Master 
signified his intention of laying before the Grand Lodge 
with the consent of the Wardens in consequence of the 
very extraordinary occurrence of unfavourable ballots in 
every case. 

The minutes do not record any case of unfavourable 
ballot except those of the said Sorabjee Hirjeebhoy and 
Rustomjee Merwanjee already referred to, but the 
brethren all agreed with the Right Worshipful Master 
and seemed to think that the ballot was being unjustifi- 
ably abused. 

The Bye-laws of the lodge were reprinted during this 
year, and from a printed copy available amongst the 
records it appears that they consisted of 47 articles. 



92 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Some of these articles may be shortly referred to here 
for information sake. 

Bye-law 2 provided that in order to render the brethren 
as efficient as practicable in their masonic duties, a lodge 
of instruction should be held once every month. 

Bye-law 5 specified the hours of assembling and closing,. 
viz., 7 p. m. or such other hour as the master might 
appoint to 11 p. m. 

Under Bye-law 22 three negatives or black balls were- 
necessary on a ballot for rejecting a candidate. 

Bye-law 27 provided that the total fees for the three 
degrees should be rupees one hundred and twenty-five 
and the joining fees rupees five and monthly subscription 
rupees three for every resident member except the 
original members of the lodge who were paying members 
of Lodge Perseverance or any other lodge. 

Bye-law 41 provided that the lodge should hold a 
special convivial meeting in each year to celebrate the 
anniversary of St. John the Evangelist. 

Bye-law 44 provided that all fines levied in the lodge 
should be placed to the credit of the lodge and applied to 
charitable purposes. 

As to the monthly subscription of original members 
reference has already been made to the resolution passed 
during the year by which those members were required 
to pay one rupee per month. 

A masonic banquet was given this year to Brother the 
Right Honourable Lord Fitz-Clarence, the Commander- 
in-Chief of the Bombay Army, and a Past Grand Master 
of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and the lodge paid 
rupees 226-7-8 being its share of the expenses thereof. 
Previously thereto an address of welcome from the 
Scotch Masons had been presented to his Lordship, and 
the office-bearers of Lodge Rising Star had the privilege 
of signing it on its behalf as one of the bodies present- 
ing it. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 93 

The Provincial Grand Master, Brother LeGeyt, was 
desirous of retiring from his exalted office of the head of 
the Fraternity in Western India as he was then shortly 
proceeding to Poona, and that circumstance was announ- 
ced at the lodge meeting of the 7th April by Brother 
Blowers, who proposed that the lodge should pass a 
resolution expressing its confidence in that worthy 
Brother, and that they were undesirous of any change so 
long as he continued within the limits of that province. On 
this occasion Brother Maneckji Cursetjee, while seconding 
the proposal after it had received the approbation of the 
brethren by cheers, said that for his own self and the 
Native brethren he would add that in Right Worshipful 
Brother LeGeyt they recognised not only the originator of 
Lodge Rising Star of Western India, but its firm supporter 
through good report and bad report, its patron in its 
poverty, its friend in its strength, and its counsellor and 
guide in all seasons, and it therefore became the members 
of the lodge to deprecate the retirement of so true a 
friend from a position in Masonry which was due to his 
masonic merit and those merits could not be acknowledged 
too often. 

Those words were but too truly spoken for the minutes 
.are a proof of the great and warm interest which Brother 
LeGeyt took in the welfare of the lodge during the time 
he was its member and master. The resolution was duly 
conveyed to the Provincial Grand Master by a deputation 
consisting of Brother Ballingal (substitute-Master) and 
Brother Maneckji Cursetjee. 

Brother M. O'Mealy was at the last meeting of the year 
(1854) elected and installed as the Master of the lodge 
for the ensuing year. The -first thing that he did was to 
convene a meeting of the lodge on 3rd January, 1854, to 
consider the necessity and advisability of representing to 
the Grand Lodge the frequent supposed abuse of the 
ballot. At that time he read a letter which embodied the 



94 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

views of himself and his wardens as to the supposed 
causes leading to the practice, and suggested the abolition 
of the ballot as one of the remedies to put a stop to the 
abuse. An animated discussion took place and a proposi- 
tion for postponing the consideration of the question for 
three months was brought forward but lost. Then the 
sense of the meeting was taken as to the necessity and 
efficiency of the proposed remedy, but was found to be 
against the proposition, whereupon the Right Worshipful 
Master remarked that in the absence of any other advice 
he felt it to be his duty to report to the Grand Lodge that 
he believed the ballot was abused and to appeal to that 
authority for some remedy. The letter read in the 
meeting is not set out in the minutes nor is the discussion 
that took place thereon. From the minutes of the next 
year's meeting it appears that the Right Worshipful 
Master had appealed to the Grand Lodge, and the members 
of the Grand Lodge Committee were to consider the ques- 
tion, but the minutes do not contain anything further about 
the matter, and it does not appear what remedy the Grand 
Lodge suggested. At this time Brother Maneckji Cursetjee 
wrote a letter on the subject of the ballot to Brother Barr, 
who was the Chairman of the Grand Lodge Committee, 
which is dated 20th June 1854. It is an excellent 
commentary on the principles of the ballot, and embodies 
sound views and also contains information otherwise not 
available as to the then state of the lodge. It is set out 
at length in the minutes of 20th August, 1857. 

The drastic remedy proposed by the Right Worshipful 
Master and Wardens was not accepted by the lodge. But 
the trouble still unfortunately continued. During this 
year six candidates were rejected on the ballot, and Bro- 
ther Bhajiwalla, who had proposed two of them, stated at 
one of the meetings at which they were rejected, that a 
conspiracy had been formed by certain members to black- 
ball the candidates proposed by him, and that consequently 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 95 

his candidates were not elected on the ballot. The Wor- 
shipful Master thereupon appointed a Committee consist- 
ing of Brothers Ballingall, Wellis, Cross, and Mahomed 
Saduck to investigate into the charge and to report upon 
it. The Committee enquired into the matter and made a 
report that in their opinion the charge was not proved, 
although there were strong grounds for suspecting that 
the ballot had been abused, and suggested that in order 
to prevent such occurrences in future, any Brother who 
should have any objection to a candidate's admission 
should state the same privately to the proposer or to the 
Right Worshipful Master, in order that the name men- 
tioned may be withdrawn before being brought to the 
ballot. Under the Bye-laws in force at the time a candi- 
date for initiation, if duly proposed and seconded at one 
meeting, and after the production of the usual declaration 
signed by him, was balloted for at the next meeting (Bye- 
law 21), and a Freemason proposed for affiliation was on 
production of his certificate and on being properly 
vouched for and duly proposed and seconded, balloted 
for at one and the same meeting. In the latter case no 
opportunity was afforded at all to the brethren to make 
inquiries into the character and qualifications of the 
proposed affiliate, and in the former case unless indi- 
vidual members made the necessary inquiry or knew 
anything against the proposed candidate nothing would 
be known, and the candidate was approved. This does 
not appear to have been considered satisfactory by some 
brethren and Brother Maneckji Cursetjee, at the close 
of the year, gave notice of his intention to lay before the 
next meeting of the lodge the following two propositions 
for modifying Bye-laws 21 and 26, namely : 

Firstly That there shall be a Standing Committee of 
the lodge consisting of two Europeans and two Natives, (of 
whom the Worshipful Master be one with a casting voice) 
one Mahomedan and one Zoroastrian to inquire first into 



96 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the character and position of every candidate previous to 
his name being brought forward at the meeting. On the 
result of the inquiry being favourable he be proposed 
and seconded at a meeting to be balloted for at the next, 
and not to be initiated until the proceedings be confirmed 
at the third following meeting. 

Secondly That no joining member be balloted for on 
the night of his, proposition, but at the next regular 
meeting, his names and the name of the Brothers by 
whom proposed and seconded appearing in the meantime 
on the summons. 

During the year sixteen meetings in all were held, of 
which five were emergent meetings convened for working 
off arrears. This was the largest number of meetings 
held in a year since the establishment of the lodge. 

There was an increase of 17 members, of whom 7 were 
initiates, one a rejoining member and the rest affiliates. 
Against this increase there were two resignations, one of 
them being of Brother Barr, one of the originators of the 
lodge, which was accepted with regret, and after the 
lodge had recorded its appreciation of his past services. 
At the end of the year, therefore, the lodge was still better 
off by 15 members, one of whom still continues to be borne 
on its rolls as an honorary member and the oldest mem- 
ber, and the other of whom until 20th August 1909 con- 
tinued as the oldest subscribing member of the lodge. 
They were Brother Dadabhoy Naorojee, the Grand Old 
Man of India, who subsequently as is well known became a 
member of the British House of Commons and attained 
the highest distinction which a Native of India can aspire 
to, and in other ways has most honourably distinguished 
himself as a great public man, and Right Worshipful 
Brother K. R. Kama, who had during his masonic career 
become a worthy pattern for imitation and had proved 
himself a staunch champion of masonic rectitude and in- 
tegrity and a firm supporter of the interests of the Craft 






OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 97 



in general and this lodge in particular. The 24th of 
August 1854 was indeed a lucky day for this lodge, as on 
that day the lodge hailed and admitted within its sacred 
walls Brother Kama, who ever since reflected great credit 
and honour on the lodge which was always justly proud 
to own him as its child. The other new members were 
Haji Mirza Mahomed, Aga Mahomed Cazini, Rustomjee 
Byramjee, Nowrojee Maneckji Lungrana and Hormusjee 
Pestonjee Framjee. The rejoining member was Brother 
Frederick Darby. The affiliates were Brothers Edward 
Roussac, John E vans,William Johnson, Curset jee Bomonjee 
Panthucky, Muncherjee Pestonjee Sethna, W. H. Macdo- 
nald, J. Jamieson, J. B. Stainbank and D. Campbell. Bro- 
ther Muncherjee Pestonjee Sethna was only an entered ap- 
prentice hailing from Lodge Zetland, Singapore, and took 
his second and third degrees in the lodge. In this year 
two Hindoo gentlemen were proposed for initiation, and 
a discussion arose as to their eligibility so long as they 
adhered to those who professed polytheism. No satisfac- 
tory conclusion having been arrived at, the Worshipful 
Master, with the concurrence of the brethren generally 
agreed to elicit the opinion of the Committee of the 
Provincial Grand Lodge who were then, as stated 
before, also to consider the question of the ballot. But 
there is no further record about the matter in the 
minutes. The two gentlemen do not appear to have been 
elected. 

It was in this year that the lodge unanimously passed 
a resolution at its meeting held on 20th February for the 
formation of a charitable fund called " The Rising Star 
Charitable Fund," on the same basis as that of the Lodge 
Perseverance. The Bye-laWs in force at this time did not 
provide for the setting! apart of any portion of the lodge 
fees for charitable purposes. This resolution was a step 
in the right direction, being in furtherance of one of the 
first teachings of masonry, viz., " RELIEF." 

7 



98 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

For the first time the lodge presented in this year a 
Past! Master's jewel. It does not appear to have been 
done before. This was a jewel presented to Right Wor- 
shipful Brother Ballingall as part of a testimonial stated 
to have been voted to him as a slight token of the appre- 
ciation of the lodge of his services during the past year 
and of their Bense of esteem for the able manner in which 
he had fulfilled his duties. 



CHAPTER IX, 



1855 Brother W. H. S. Crawford was elected and duly 
installed at the anniversary meeting as the Worshipful 
Master for the ensuing year, and Brother Dadabhoy 
Nowroji was appointed Secretary. 

The year began with an unfortunate incident, for one 
of the brethren, namely Brother Merwanjee Maneckjee 
Sethna, challenged the legality of the election of the Right 
Worshipful Master, and preferred his complaint in that 
behalf to the Provincial Grand Master, and forwarded it 
to the Right Worshipful Master *f or being submitted to 
him, and also addressed a letter to the lodge protesting 
against the legality of its further proceedings pending 
the decision of the Provincial Grand Master- He also 
forwarded a copy of his complaint direct to the Provincial 
Grand Secretary for being placed before the Provincial 
Grand Master. At the very first meeting held on 28th 
January these letters of the complaining B-.rother were 
read. The Right Worshipful Master declared that 
Brother Merwanjee Maneckjee had rendered himself 
liable to punishment under Bye-laws 38 and 43, in that 
he had forwarded his complaint direct to the Provincial 
Grand Secretary instead of as provided for by Bye-law 38, 
through the Master, and decided that a Special Committee 
should be appointed consisting of the Standing Committee 
of the lodge and Brothers Wellis (Chaplain) and Ballingall 
(who had volunteered to join in it) to report on the 
matter, and on Brother O'Meally's suggestion the Secre- 
tary was requested and agreed to be present in the Com- 
mittee with the proceedings. 



100 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The ground of the complaint is not set out in the 
minutes of that meeting, but it appears from subsequenet 
proceedings that the ground was that proxies were 
improperly admitted to the ballot box at the election 
contrary to the Constitutions and the Bye-laws of the 
lodge. The Bye-law which regulated the election of the 
Worshipful Master was Bye-law No. 8, which prescribed 
election by baltlot. 

Bye-law 38 distinctly required an appeal by any 
Brother to the Provincial Grand Lodge against any 
decision or proceedings of the lodge to be preferred 
through the Worshipful Master of the lodge, and under 
Bye-Law 43 any Brother wilfully infringing any Bye-law 
could be fined or dealt with according to the decision of 
the majority of the lodge. It also appears that Brother 
Merwanjee Maneckjee after making the complaint did 
not attend the regular lodge meetings pending the 
decision of the Provincial Grand lodge. 

At the next meeting held on 20th February the report 
of the Committee on the subject of Brother Merwanjee 
Maneckjee's complaint that the election of the Right Wor- 
shipful Master was illegal was read and the Right Wor- 
shipful Master intimated that he would send that report and 
the complaining Brother's letter to the Provincial Grand 
Lodge and would communicate the result to the brethren 
in due course and that meanwhile he would defer taking 
any further notice of that Brother's irregularities. The 
matter was accordingly placed before the Provincial 
Grand Lodge and that body decided that proxies were 
not admissable to the ballot-box and could not be per- 
mitted in the election of a master and that their intro- 
duction in the case in question was contrary to the 
universal practice of the Craft, to the spirit of the 
constitutions, and in defiance of the Bye-laws of the lodge, 
and pointed out that the lodge having fallen into the 
error the election of the Worshipful Master could not be 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 101 

Tegarded as valid and that the lodge should therefore 
proceed at the next regular meeting to a re-election of a 
master in due and ancient form after 7 days' notice to 
the members of such meeting. 

The Grand Lodge at the same time guaranteed the 
validity of Brother Crawford's acts during the time he had 
-acted as Worshipful Master and expressed their opinion 
that Brother Merwanjee Maneckjee's conduct in not 
obeying the summons sent to him was contumacious as 
it was in violation of the principles of Freemasonry 
which required specially the exercise of three excellences 
of character, " Secrecy, Fidelity, and Obedience, " and 
that he should therefore be admonished in open lodge. 

In accordance with the decision of the Grand lodge a 
ballot was again taken for a master at a lodge meeting 
held on 23rd April, and Brother Crawford was elected 
by a majority of votes and after his election, was saluted 
in due and ancient form. He then at the same meeting 
admonished Brother Merwanjee Maneckjee as directed 
by the Grand Lodge, whereupon the Secretary with the 
permission of the Worshipful Master read a statement, 
which had been prepared by Brother Merwanjee Maneckji 
for the occasion, and which he wanted read as containing 
his explanation in the matter. 

In the statement Brother Merwanjee Maneckjee 
averred that but for the command of the Provincial 
Grand Lodge whose authority he w r as bound to obey he 
would have said a great deal to show that Brother 
Crawford, and not he, should have been reprimanded for 
infringing the most fundamental principle of the Order 
-and that the Grand Lodge had been obviously (whether 
intentionally or not he could not say) misled as to 
matters of fact on a very simple question at issue be- 
tween him and the Right Worshipful Master and the 
brethren who supported him unconstitutionally in the 
chair and which had been decided in his favour. He 



102 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

explained that having questioned the legality of the 
election of the Right Worshipful Master and protested 
throughout against his acts he could not consistently 
and conscientiously attend any meeting, or any body of 
brethren met by his order or by any resolution passed by 
the lodge of which he had been illegally elected master, 
and that if the Grand Lodge thought otherwise all he 
could say was, he was sorry for it. Then as to Bye-law 
38 he explained that he had not at all infringed it for 
the complaint was forwarded by him to the Secretary of 
the lodge for being transmitted by him tJo the Grand 
lodge and a copy of it was sent by him to the Provincial 
Grand Secretary as the Provincial Grand Lodge was then 
about to meet in a few days and was not to meet again 
for three months, and he wanted to take time by the 
forelock and that he had sent to the Provincial Grand 
Master a copy of his protest against the lodge proceed- 
ings pending the decision of the Grand Lodge which he- 
had found it indespensable to send to the Secretary of the 
lodge with some observations of which he had made no- 
secret, and that he had therefore strictly followed rule 
38 in sending his complaint and protest through the 
lodge. 

This explanation was it will be seen an attempt on 
Brother Merwanjee Maneckjee's part to justify his con- 
duct and a commentary on the decision of the Grand 
Lodge. After it was read Right Worshipful Brother H. 
D. Cartwright, who was then the officiating Provincial 
Grand Master and was present throughout the proceed- 
ings, addressed the lodge and in so doing stated that the 
Provincial Grand Lodge had to set aside the election as 
proxies had been admitted to the ballot-box, contrary to- 
the spirit of the ballot, to the Bye-laws of tihe lodge, and 
to the universal custom of the Craft, but at the same 
time they recognised that the error had been uninten- 
tionally committed and confirmed Brother Grawfords* 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 103 

acts, and that in his opinion Brother Merwanjee Man- 
eckjee's letter was unnecessary, not to use any harsher 
term, and that he had erred in one point as a master 
mason and detailed that point, and added that as the new 
election was in favour of Brother Crawford, Brother 
Merwanjee Maneckjee would remember that one of the 
duties of the most humble and unenlightened mason 
was " to acquiesce cheerfully in all rules and resolutions 
passed by a majority of the brethren/'* The incident 
however closed here, but it appears to have engendered 
want of unanimity and of good feelings in some of the 
brethren in the discussions during the year and also in a 
measure frustrated the efforts of the Right Worshipful 
Master in the cause of the welfare of the lodge, and 
damped his ardour and also to some extent contributed to 
the finances of the lodge being in a low state at the end 
of the year. The letter containing the decision of the 
Grand Lodge and the statement of Brother Merwanjee 
Maneckjee thereon will be found in Appendix H. 

The propositions of Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee for 
modifying Bye-laws Nos. 21 and 26 were discussed during 
the year and that relating to Bye-law No. 26 was passed 
by a majority of votes, while as to the other, the first 
part thereof relating to the constitution of a Standing 
Committee for inquiring into a candidate's character, was 
withdrawn by Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee in conse- 
quence of his not being allowed by the Right Worshipful 
Master to read fully, after he had read in part, at the 
meeting at which it was brought up for discussion, a 
letter he had written to Right Worshipful Brother Barr 
explaining the grounds thereof, as it contained some 
personal allusions, and the latter portion was rejected 
by a majority of votes. 

Prior, however, to the discussion of the proposition in 
open lodge a circumstance happened which shows that a 
high ideal of masonic rectitude prevailed at this time in 



104 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

regard to the holding of private meetings outside the 
lodge to discuss propositions laid or to be laid before the 
lodge at its regular meetings on the ground that such 
meetings were irregular and unconstitutional and sub- 
jected the brethren attending them to suspension or 
expulsion, and the Brother calling them, to a charge of 
forming a clique in the lodge. It is recorded that at the 
first meeting of the year Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee 
proposed that the discussion of the said propositions of 
which he had given notice at the close of last year 
should be postponed owing to the lateness of the hour, as 
he had to offer a long explanation and stated that in the 
meantime and before the propositions came up for dis- 
cussion he would call a private meeting of the native 
brethren at his bungalow and prepare them for the 
discussion by explaining to them his grounds therefor. 
Brother O'Meally and two other European brethren 
expressed their disapproval of the course proposed and 
two of them said that such a course was not only 
unconstitutional but was dangerous. Brother Maneckjee 
Cursetjee defended his view and in support thereof cited 
and relied upon precedents which, he said, were furnished 
by the practice of high functionaries like Brothers Burnes, 
LeGeyt, Blowers, and others, and also the Right Worship- 
ful Master in the chair, and the Acting Secretary, Brother 
O'Meally, with whom, he said, he already had interviews 
for explaining the grounds of his propositions in question. 
No ruling was, however, asked for from or given by the 
Right Worshipful Master. 

During the year Right Worshipful Brother LeLeyt 
resigned his office of Provincial Grand Master and an 
address was voted to him by the Provincial Grand Lodge 
and Lodge Rising Star was at the suggestion of Brother 
Cartwright, the Deputy Provincial Grand Master, given 
an opportunity of joining in the address when regularly 
engrossed on parchment, to testify to the masonic feelings 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 105 

regard of the brethren for the retiring brother, and 
a draft of it prepared by the Provincial Grand Secretary, 
Brother Blowers,was read at the lodge meeting held on 20th 
March. At this meeting a resolution wa-s passed author- 
ising the circulation amongst the brethren of a list of 
subscriptions to a fund started by some of the brethren 
for presenting a jewel to Right Worshipful Brother 
O'Meally for his valuable and zealous services during his 
mastership, the jewel to be of small value, as desired by 
that worthy Brother, and the surplus after purchasing 
the jewel to be set aside for a charitable fund. It may 
be mentioned that at a meeting held on 20th August the 
Right Worshipful Master had announced that the chari- 
table fund of the lodge had been fairly started and that 
Rs. 250 were already to the credit of that fund in the 
Bank. 

In all ten meetings were held during the year and 
almost all of them were largely attended. The degree 
work done was only one initiation, one passing and three 
raisings. The number of new members was seven, of 
whom six were affiliates and joining members and only 
one was an initiate. But against this increase there were 
.six resignations. The initiate was Dossabhoy Byramjee 
Pesikakana. The affiliates were Brother H. D. Cartwright, 
who was the Deputy Provincial Grand Master, and also 
officiated as the Provincial Grand Master of Western 
India, Brother C. M. I. Pollock, then the Provincial 
Grand Senior Warden of Western India, and a Past 
Master of Lodge St. George, Brothers G. Craig, R. T. 
Yuill, Kobs, and J. G. Lawrence. 

Brother Cartwright was uanimously elected as a joining 
member at his own desire openly expressed to the lodge 
at a meeting at which he was present and had stated 
that he felt great interest in the success and prosperity 
of the lodge and hoped he would be balloted for at the 
next meeting. 



106 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

As to Brother Lawerence there was a difficulty. He 
was proposed for affiliation at a meeting held on 20th 
October and was also put to the ballot at the same 
meeting. Brother Lawerence was present at this meet- 
ing as a visitor. Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee protested 
against the immediate ballot as being in violation of the 
B-ye-law which was passed by the lodge only on the 23rd 
April preceding, under which a Brother proposed for 
affiliation could not be balloted for on the night of his 
proposition. The new Bye-law had, it appears, not yet 
then been confirmed by the Grand Lodge. There was 
some discussion but Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee's pro- 
test was not allowed. The votes were taken and Brother 
Lawerence was declared elected by 11 votes against one 
and the one dissenting vote was of Brother Maneckjee 
Cursetjee and was recorded by him (as he said at a 
subsequent meeting) with the avowed object of putting 
in a black ball as a protest against the Brother's election 
under the circumstances. At the next meeting of the 
lodge held on 20th November, Brother Maneckjee Cur- 
setjee after the minutes of the last meeting were read, 
objected to that part in which Brother Lawerence was 
declared a member of the lodge on the ground that the 
election was in opposition to a Bye -law of the lodge and 
could not be recognised in the proceedings. Brother Kobs 
argued that the new Bye-law was of no consequence as the 
Worshipful Master had the powerof placing the Bye-laws 
in abeyance. The Bye-laws of the lodge did not give any 
such power to the Worshipful Master. Brother O'Meally 
argued that the Bye-law could not be relied upon by 
Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee, first because at the time it 
was passed it was not ascertained whether the votes in its 
favour were as two to one against it as required by Bye- 
law 45, and secondly because it had not yet then been 
recognised by the Grand Lodge. Brother Cartwright 
who was present at this meeting expressed his opinion 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 107 

that the omission on the record as to the votes for and 
against the resolution by which the lodge passed the 
Bye-law in question could not affect its efficacy after the 
proceedings of the meeting at which it was passed had 
been confirmed by a subsequent meeting of the lodge, 
nor was the omission to obtain the approval of the Grand 
Lodge of importance, but considering that it would be 
hard that Brother Lawrence should suffer he recom- 
mended the confirmation of the minutes of the last 
meeting. The Right Worshipful Master said that the 
minutes objected to were true and as such should be 
passed and indeed that was so. They were then put to 
the votes and confirmed by 12 votes against six. 

The Brothers resigning were W. Blowers, P. Jones, G. 
Kingstone, G. F. Remington, W. Crawford, and J. Jamie- 
son, and of these the last named resigned because a 
candidate proposed by him was rejected on the ballot 
and he took the rejection as an insult to him and the 
Brother who had seconded his proposal. Brother LeGeyt 
also retired this year. 

During this year also, the ballot, it was complained,, 
was more than ever abused for 7 candidates were reject- 
ed. They were Nusserwanjee Byramjee Bhownager- 
walla, Bomonjee Nowrojee, Muncherjee Ratanjee Bilimo- 
ria, Pestonjee Ratanjee Kola, Sorabjee Cawasjee Saher, 
J. H. Hannah, and W. A. L. McKenzie. Mr. Bhownager- 
walla was proposed by Brother Jamieson and as he was 
not accepted Brother Jamieson resigned. 

Mr. Bomonjee Nowrojee who had been duly proposed 
for initiation was balloted for but rejected at the meet- 
ing held on 24th November 1854 but it having been 
found that Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee had voted at 
the ballot while he was in arears of the lodge dues, the 
ballot was declared to be illegal and the Secretary was 
directed to ask Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee for an 
explanation as to why he voted knowing that he was in- 



108 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

arrears of the lodge dues. At the meeting held on 20th 
January 1855 some correspondence between that Brother 
and the Secretary was read and ordered to be recorded 
and probably that was correspondence in which Brother 
Maneckjee Cursetjee rendered his explanation. Brother 
Bomonjee Nowrojee's name was withdrawn at this meet- 
ing by Brother H. P. Framjee. He was, however, again 
proposed (and the minutes say for affiliation) on 23rd 
April 1855 by Brother Evans and seconded by Brother 
Darby and was brought to the ballot at a meeting held 
on 20th May. Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee objected to his 
admission on the ground of his being once black-balled and 
thereupon Brother Evans withdrew his name though no 
other member of the lodge objected. The proposals and 
unfavorable ballot for Messrs. Billimoria, Kola, Saher 
and Hannah were not attended with any circumstances 
deserving any notice but the rejection of Brother 
McKenzie showed that the trouble regarding the ballot 
was increasing and brought matters to a crisis. That 
Brother belonged to Lodge Perseverance and was proposed 
by Brother Evans and seconded by Brother O'Meally and 
was balloted for at the meeting held on 20th December 
and with an unfavourable result. The Right Worshipful 
Master on the ballot being unfavourable addressedthe lodge 
and in doing so said that Brother McKenzie who was his 
friend and resided under the same roof had applied for 
affiliation from a desire to support the lodge and was a 
worthy member of society and was not intimately known 
to any one in the lodge except himself and that under 
those circumstances, his good character, and the fact 
that he was nearly a stranger, the ballot should be tried 
again. This was done but the Brother was rejected by 
four votes. 

Brother O'Meally then said that after that result 
there could be but little doubt that the ballot was 
abused and that there was no alternative but to have 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 109- 

the lodge closed and its charter returned, and that he 
would therefore move' that at the next meeting the lodge 
should decide whether the ballot was or was not abused. 
The motion was supported by Brothers Jordan and 
Maneckjee Cursetjee. 

At this meeting Mr. Muncherjee Ratanjee Bilimoria, 
who had been rejected on the ballot taken at the 
meeting on 20th December, was again proposed for 
initiation. 

During the year the lodge had resolved strictly to 
enforce its Bye-laws 24 and 29 which dealt with members 
committing default in payment of lodge dues and had 
actually ordered the privileges of two brethren to be in 
abeyance pending liquidation of lodge dues owing by 
them- 

Brother Dadabhoy Nowrojee, it appears, went to Eng- 
land shortly after his becoming Secretary and Brother 
O'Meally was appointed to fill the office in his place. 

The following resolution was passed by the lodge by a 
majority at a meeting held on the 21st May 1855, viz., 
" That the monthly subscription of joining members from 
the sister Lodge Perseverance be raised from Rupee one 
to Rupee one and annas eight, being half the regular 
monthly subscription/' In connection with this proposi- 
tion there was a little discussion between the Right 
Worshipful Master and Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee 
which is recorded in the minutes in the form of a 
dialogue. Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee hai proposed 
an amendment that the joining members from Lodge 
Perseverance should pay the same amount as was levied 
by Lodge Perseverance from members of Lodge Rising 
Star on tfceir joining it. He was asked whether the 
amendment should have retrospective or prospective 
effect, and he said that that question would be mooted, 
after the amendment was decided on the ballot as a 
distinct proposition, and further he wanted to know 



110 HISTORY' OF LODGE RISING STAR 

whether the original proposition was to have a retros- 
pective effect or prospective effect. Brother O'Meally 
said that it was not usual to answer a question by a 
question whereupon Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee said 
that if that was so, it was not right to put a question. 
The question was, however, again put tolBrother Maneck- 
jee Cursetjee from the chair, and he had to complete his 
amendment by inserting the amount and providing that 
it was to have effect as regards brethren who had 
already joined or might thereafter join the lodge. His 
amendment was negatived as also was another amend- 
ment which was proposed by Brother O'Meally providing 
that the future joining members should pay Rupees three 
per month while the members who had then already 
been affiliated should pay only Rupee one and annas 
eight per month. 

On 20th September 1855, a resolution was passed by 
the lodge again by a majority instituting a dinner fee of 
Rupee one and annas eight from each member remaining 
for dinner. The practice up to this time must evidently 
have been for the lodge to defray the dinner expenses. 
But as the finances were very low this fee appears to 
have been devised by the Right Worshipful Master, at 
whose instance the resolution was passed as a relief 
to some extent. 

The first part of the " Indian Freemason's Friend," 
presented by the Editor and favoured by Brother 
Lawrence, was laid before the lodge in the beginning of 
this year. 

Brother Evans was elected and installed at the last 
meeting held on 20th December as the Right Worshipful 
Master for the ensuing year and Brother O'Meally was 
again appointed Secretary. 

A report was rendered by the retiring master of his 
stewardship and is set out in the minutes of this meeting, 
and this appears to have been the first report ever ren- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. Ill 

dered by a retiring master for the minutes of any of 
the previous years do not record any such reports. The 
minutes of this meeting also record the performance for 
the first time since the establishment of the lodge of the 
installation ceremony by the Provincial Grand Master. 



CHAPTER X. 



1856. The minute book does not contain any minutes 
of meetings held during the year 1856. There is, how- 
ever, a loose sheet of paper which contains the record of 
a meeting held on 20th February 1856, and it appears 
therefrom that a letter from the Grand Secretary of 
the Grand Lodge of Scotland enclosing a certificate 
enabling the lodge to work till St. John's Day was read. 

Ballots were taken for three gentlemen, viz Muncher jee 
Ratanjee Bilimoria, Mahomed Gulam Hoosein, and 
Hormusjee Bomonjee Kaka, who had been proposed for 
admission at the last meeting held in the previous year, 
but the result was unfavourable in each case. 

Here Brother O'Meally rose in support of his motion, 
"That in the opinion of the lodge the ballot was abused/' 
but was interrupted by the Right Worshipful Master who 
after consulting Brothers W. H. S. Crawford and 
Ballingall observed that there was no use going into details 
on such a question, that the result of the ballot had clearly 
established the fact, and that with the concurrence of 
the Past Masters and Officers of the lodge he would close 
the lodge pending the decision of higher authority as to 
the propriety of its ever being again opened, and the lodge 
was then closed in solemn form. Brother Maneckjee 
Cursetjee was also present at this meeting. After this 
no meeting appears to have been heild during the rest of 
the year nor until the middle of the next year, until when 
the lodge remained closed, and when fortunately it was 
resusciated. After an existence of a decade and two 
years during which it had its good days and bad, the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 113 

climax wa.s reached and misfortune so overtook the 
lodge that for a time its onward career was checked. At ,/ 
this time there was also a great paucity of members ' 
which was another circumstance, that in a way neces- j 
sitated the closing of the lodge. 



CHAPTER XI. 



1857. In the year 1857 the first minutes recorded are 
of a meeting held on 29th July at the residence of Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji. It was presided over by the Right 
Worshipful Master Brother J. Evans, and had been called 
for the purpose of electing a master for the ensuing year. 
The Provincial Grand Master was present at this meeting. 

At the commencement of the proceedings the Right 
Worshipful Master reminded the brethren that his term 
of office had long since expired, and that it had been a 
source of great regret and disappointment that obstacles 
had been thrown in his way which had prevented him 
from working the lodge, but that he hoped, however, that 
his successor would not harve to encounter the same 
difficulties and that the lodge would in future work 
harmoniously. Brother Maneckji Cursetji was then 
unanimously elected Master for the ensuing year. The 
Provincial Grand Master thereupon expressed his 
satisfaction a# the result of the ballot and in congratulat- 
ing the Worshipful Master-elect expressed his hope that 
as they had met again all dissensions and unpleasantness 
that had previously prevailed would cease to exist and 
that the lodge would be worked with increased zeal. 

Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee, in acknowledging the 
honour conferred upon him, said that considering the 
position the lodge was then in, and being second to none 
in his zeal in the cause of Freemasonry in general and the 
lodge in particular, he could not refuse to accept the mas- 
tership as he had done on a former occasion, but would 
do his best to render the lodge prosperous. These minutes 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 115 

show the lodge had not met again since it was closed on 
20th February 1856, and that the unanimity among the 
brethren had not been restored till the date thereof. 
It was reported by Brother Treasurer at this meeting 
that the lodge was in debt to the extent of Rupees two 
hundred, the greater part of which was due to Lodge Per- 
severance, and thereupon a proposal was made by Brother 
Maneckjee Cursetjee, which was seconded by Brother 
Hormusjee Pestonjee Framjee, that a subscription of 
Rupees ten each be raised among the members of the 
lodge as a contribution to wards the liquidation of the debt. 

Four more meetings were held during the year 1857, 
viz., on 20th August, 21st September, 20th October 
.and 20th November. 

The meeting of 20th August was specially convened for 
installing the Worshipful Master-elect. The Provincial 
vGrand Master was again present at this meeting also 
and performed the installation ceremony. For the first 
time charges are found delivered to the Right Worship- 
ful Master, Wardens and Brethren, by the installing 
Brother. They are set out in extenso in the minutes 
and were almost in the same terms as the charges 
.appearing in the printed Ritual book at the present 
day. After the installation ceremony was over Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji delivered a short but telling address 
of thanks in a feeling manner and in the course of 
it referred to the principles on which the lodge had 
been originally constructed and the harmony that at first 
prevailed and the differences which subsequently marred 
and disturbed it and had the letter he had addressed on 
20th January 1854 to Worshipful Brother Barr (to which 
reference has been already made and a copy whereof 
is, set out in Appendix I) read and ordered it to be 
appended to the lodge proceedings, and after assuring 
the brethren that he had to the best of his ability 
acquitted himself of the trust reposed in him by Brothers 



116 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Dr. Burnes and LeGeyt when the lodge was established 
he concluded by promising that he would not suffer the 
harmony of the lodge to be on any account disturbed 
were it in his power to prevent it, nor do aught dis- 
pleasing to or against the wishes of the brethren, nor 
countenance any measure contravening the constitutions 
and Bye-laws, nor in short do anything to impair the 
prosperity of the lodge or credit of the Order. 

The first thing that Brother Maneckji Cursetji did on 
his assuming the government of the lodge was to revise 
the code of Bye-laws reviving the principles and rules on 
which the lodge was originally founded in consultation 
with the past and substitute masters and the principal 
officers of the lodge and these revised Bye-laws w r ere 
discussed and unanimously adopted and approved of at a 
meeting held on 21st September 1857, subject to the 
confirmation of the Provincial Grand Master, and as 
appears from what Brother Maneckji Cursetji stated at 
the time, in no \vay materially differed from the Bye- 
laws of Lodge Perseverance with the exception of the 
rules relating to the admission and inclusion of members. 
At the meeting held on 20th October an additional 
Bye-law was passed in the following terms: viz-, "That 
it would be left optional with those European members 
on the existing rolls of this lodge who have been affiliated 
from Lodge Perseverance to pay either the full amount 
of the subscription Rupees four as now ruled, or the 
reduced subscription of Rupees two per month, they 
having joined the lodge on the understanding that 
they have to pay half subscription; but that this 
privilege be not accorded to members hereafter to be 
affiliated from Perseverance or any other working lodge 
or to the rejoining members." 

During this year there was only one new member 
enrolled, namely Brother Cursetji Nusserwanji Cama, 
while three brethren resigned, namely, Brothers Comp- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 117 

ton, Yuill and Carvalho. It was stated by the Right 
Worshipful Master, while Brother Compton's resignation 
was accepted, and with regret, that he was then the 
only remaining Brother among the original European 
members of the lodge. 

It appears from the minutes of the meeting of 20th 
November that Brothers Craig, Cross, and O'Mealy had 
been suspended, and their names withdrawn during the 
suspension sometime previously, and that at that meeting 
they were re-enrolled as members as they had been 
restored by the Provincial Grand Lodge to ' the privileges 
<of Masonry. 

The minutes do not state the cause of suspension, but 
from " The History of Scottish Freemasonry in India/' 
written by Brother I. M. Shields and printed in The Indian 
Freemason and Monthly Miscellany, Vol. XL, pp. 154-5, 
it appears that about the middle of the year 1856 
serious disputes had arisen between Lodge Perseverance 
and the Provincial Grand Lodge in connection with the 
use of the lodge rooms permitted to Lodge St. George, 
.th'e only English lodge then working in Bombay by the 
various Scotch bodies jointly occupying the Free Masons' 
Hall, and Lodge Perseverance objected to this on the 
ground that the use was allowed in violation of the 
arrangement which had been made in 1853 by the 
various Scotch bodies for hi ring the lodge rooms. Bro- 
ther G. S. Judge was at this tima the Worshipful Master 
of Lodge Perseverance and Brother Cartwright was the 
Provincial Grand Master, and the latter was charged with 
.collusion with the Worshipful Master of Lodge Rising 
Star and with tha Principal of the Royal Arch Chapter, 
Perseverance in the matter. Lodge Perseverance 
.declared the convention dissolved and even objected to 
the Grand Lodge meeting in the lodge rooms. It is 
recorded that considerable acrimonious correspondence 
passed between the Provincial Grand Lodge and Lodge 



118 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Perseverance and the Provincial Grand Master had 
formally suspended Lodge Perseverance from working,, 
and its master and officers from office,, and that commu- 
nications were also addressed by both bodies to the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland and petitions and memorials had also 
been presented by the Worshipful Master and office-bear- 
ers of Lodge Perseverance to the Grand Lodge of Scot- 
land and that the latter dismissed all the petitions and re- 
established the authority of the Provincial Grand Master 
which had been called in question, and considering that 
the case required the exercise of wholesome severity 
suspended from all masonic privileges certain members 
of Lodge Perseverance including Brothers Craig, Cross 
and O'Mealy. It is also recorded in the said history 
that subsequently Lodge Perseverance loyally accepted 
the decision of the Grand Lodge of Scotland and the 
suspended members (except Brother Judge) having made 
reparation were restored by the Provincial Grand Lodge 
to their membership and offices. 

As a fact Brother Craig was present at the meeting of 
Lodge Rising Star held on 21st November and expressed 
his gladness to continue as a member of the lodge. 

It may here be noted that with the exception of 
Brother Crawford (Substitute-Master) and Brother Jordan 
(Secretary) all the other office-bearers during this year 
were native brethren. Harmony seems to have been, 
once again restored after the trouble the lodge had 
undergone in the previous years. 

A resolution was passed by the lodge unani mously on 
21st September, by which it resolved to pay Rs. 20 per 
mensem as its share for the use of the rooms of Lodge 
Perseverance and kit, etc. 

At the last meeting held during the year Right 
Worshipful Brother Maneckji Cursetji was re-elected 
Master and Brother Jordan was elected Treasurer for 
the ensuing year. 



CHAPTER XII. 



1858. The year 1858 was more prosperous than its 
predecessor and good-will and harmony were also main- 
tained. At the very first meeting held on 8th January 
(St. John's Day, old style) Right Worshipful Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji was reinstalled in the Easter Chair in 
the usual form. 

Nine new members were enrolled consisting* of five 
initiates, two affiliates or joining members and two rejoin- 
ing members. The initiates were Jamasji Byramji Cola, 
Sorabji Cawasji Saher, Meer Akbarali, Mirza Gulam- 
hussein and Maneckji Sorabji Ashburner. The affiliates 
were Brothers Short and W. H. Hazelles. The latter came 
from Lodge Perseverance and is stated to have been 
elected as a rejoining member, but the minutes of the 
previous years do not show that this Brother was ever 
proposed, balloted for or elected as a joining member 
any time before, though it appears that he on several 
occasions acted as the Tyler of the lodge. That Brother 
had thus during the former years made himself useful 
to the lodge and again offered his services in this post 
upon Brother Cowasji Hirjihhoy, who held the office of 
Tyler, resigning his membership in consequence of his 
having left Bombay, and he was thereupon regularly 
proposed, balloted for and elected a rejoining mem- 
ber. The Right Worshipful Master on that occasion 
remarked that it was not easy to fill the office of 
Tyler, for though one of the lowest in the grade, 
it was still the most important post in the lodge, 
and the Brother who readily filled it would not 



120 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

be so much under an obligation to the lodge as the 
lodge must be under to him. Brother Hazelles was 
appointed upon the terms on which his predecessors had 
held the office, viz., at his option of charging no fees and 
paying no subscription, or, as in Lodge Perseverance, 
charging his usual fees each night of his attendance and 
paying the entrance fee and subscription of Rupees four 
a month as an ordinary member of the lodge. 

The rejoining members were Brother Mir Jafferalli 
(Khan Bahadur) and AH Akbar. The first-named was 
elected a member on 2 1st January 1853 and took his 
first degree on 7th April following. The records between 
1853 and 1858 do not show that he had withdrawn from 
the lodge but as he was elected as a rejoining member 
during this year he must have previously resigned. He 
was this year " passed " five years after he was made an 
Entered Apprentice. 

There were five resignations during the year, viz., of 
Brothers Cowasji Hirjibhoy Cola and Short as mentioned 
above and of Brothers W. H. S. Crawford and O'Mealy. 
The last named Brother was upon the acceptance of his 
resignation elected an honorary member of the lodge. 
By the end of this year the few European brethren who 
were still members of the lodge had one after the other 
nearly resigned and of those that were still borne on the 
rolls none was senior to Brother Maneckji Cursetji or 
none who could work the lodge or act as a Past Master. 
The lodge was now better off financially than before. It 
had during the year made a contribution of Rupees fifty 
towards the purchase of a building in Edinburgh and fit- 
ting it up as a temple for the Grand Lodge of Scotland 
in response to the appeal for that purpose forwarded to 
the Provincial Grand Lodge of Western India from 
that body, which contribution was supplemented by indi- 
vidual donations by the members amounting to Rupees one 
hundred and twenty-eight. After paying this contribu- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 121 

iion and all disbursements during the year there was 
still at the end of the year a credit balance of about 
Rupees six hundred not taking into account arrears 
amounting to about Rupees three hundred. This state of 
-the finances was then considered highly satisfactory, 
contrasted no doubt with the deplete state of the treasury 
when Right Worshipful Brother Maneckji Cur set ji 
assumed the government of the lodge eighteen months 
^before which showed a debit balance or debt of Rupees 
four hundred to Rupees five hundred, The Treasurer, 
Brother Jordan, had in his department shown good 
work and was at the end of the year re-elected to the 
responsible office of Treasurer. At the meeting at which 
the Rupees fifty towards the fund started for the Grand 
Lodge Temple in Scotland were voted the Right Wor- 
shipful Master stated to the lodge that the position of 
the fraternity in the Presidency town of Bombay was 
very incongruous, for while the other Presidency and 
several of its provincial towns could boast of possessing 
temples of their own, the Masons at Bombay had to hold 
their meetings in rented houses and had done nothing to- 
wards having a masonic temple erected in B.ombay, 
though the subject had been discussed for years and at 
one time a large fund had been bespoken and some 
brethren had also promised to give some ground. Brother 
O'Mealy promised then to collect all information relative 
to the past proceedings and to draw up a scheme or pros- 
pectus regarding the same and was requested to lay it 
before the Standing Committee in view of its being 
placed before the Provincial Grand Lodge and the other 
lodges working in and out of the Bombay Presidency. 
A visiting B-.rother of the name of Fogerty, who was pre- 
sent at that meeting, then informed the Right Worship- 
ful Master that a princely sum of Rs. 80,000 existed in 
deposit with the Accountant-General, being the principal 
.and accumulated interest for a number of years of a 



122 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

bequest made by a Brother named D. Seton to the old 
Lodge Perseverance under the banners of England for 
the purpose of building a temp le at Bombay and was 
requested to supply the Committee with the particulars 
of the deposit. Brother Maneckji Cursetji himself had 
also offered a piece of ground at Byculla for the purpose 
of erecting a masonic temple upon certain conditions 
and a Committee had been appointed by the Grand Lodge 
to report upon it but the Committee did not recommend 
the acceptance of the offer chiefly on the ground that the 
situation of the land was undesirable and the condition 
attached to the offer might cause some misunderstanding 
in future as to the ownership of the land. The offer was 
therefore refused with thanks. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji was at the last meeting of 
the year re-elected master of the lodge but he did not 
agree to accept the office again for the third time until 
after he was assured by the Provincial Grand Master 
that such acceptance would not be inconsistent with 
masonic laws and usages and until he could obtain the 
assistance of some Brother experienced in the working 
of the lodge in his absence and aiding him when present^ 
He at the same time openly avowed that though personal 
considerations might influence him in resigning the chair, 
the masonic and other considerations involving the stabi- 
lity and permanency of the lodge would not make him 
shrink from the responsibility and that he would not be 
backward in doing his best in the interest of the lodge 
whether in or off its chair. This indeed was character- 
istic of Brother Maneckji Cursetji for not only did he 
strive his best for the advancement of the lodge and 
promotion of its welfare, whether in weal or woe, sunshine 
or shade, but such level best was performed in a whole- 
hearted and sincere, and at times when occasion required 
in a vigorous and emphatic manner. He accordingly 
addressed a letter on 12th December 1858 to the Pro- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 123 

vincial Grand Master on the subject of his re-election 
and as he subsequently at the very first meeting held on 
4th January 1859 accepted and resumed the chair during 
the year 1859, the reply of the Provincial Grand Mas- 
ter must have been in his favour. His letter to the Pro- 
vincial Grand Master was read and recorded and a copy 
was set out in the minutes of the meeting. He appointed 
Brother O'Mealy as Past Master, and Brother 
Ballingal Substitute Master. 

During this year ten meetings were held and one 
meeting duly convened could not be held for want of the 
requisite number of members required to open the lodge. 
The degree work done consisted of three initiations, one 
passing and two raasings. Only two new members joined 
while six members resigned the lodge. The additions 
were Brothers Dosabhai Ruttonji Cola and Nowroji 
Maneckji Wadia. The members resigning were Brothers 
Ballingal, Darby, Hormasji Pestonji Framji, Nowroji 
Nanabhai Framji, Nowroji Maneckji Langrana and 
Mahomed Saduck. Brother Ballingal retired as he was 
proceeding to England owing to ill-health. As he had 
taken a warm interest in the welfare of the lodge and 
taken an active part while governing it as Substitute 
Master, the lodge, while accepting his resignation, unani- 
mously passed a resolution that a suitable address signed 
by the Right Worshipful Master, Wardens and Secretary 
be presented to him expressing the regret of the lodge at 
his indifferent health, and adding its grateful acknow- 
ledgment of his past services. 

This year again the financial condition of the lodge 
showed an improvement, for at its close the funds stood 
at Rs. 1,197-6-8, and that in spite of the fact that several 
members were in arrears of payment of their dues while 
those who had committed default in payment were after 
notice struck out and their names were ordered to remain 
in a separate list as defaulting members. Brother Jordan 



124 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

had discharged up to now his duties as Treasurer very 
efficiently, with hearty interest and creditably to himself 
.and advantageously to the lodge and was therefore 
presented at the last meeting of the year ( at which he 
had again consented to continue as Treasurer for the 
ensuing year) with the Founder's Medal. 

On 25th July 1859 a resolution was passed by the lodge 
that its future meetings should be held generally at the 
residence of Brother Maneckji Cursetji when there should 
be no particular occasion to resort to the rooms of Lodge 
Perseverance, and that a letter should be addressed to 
the Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance cordially 
thanking that lodge for the readiness with which they 
allowed the use of their rooms and kit for Rupees twenty 
per month and requesting him to obtain the sanction of 
his lodge that in future the lodge should be allowed to 
pay Rupees ten instead of Rupees twenty for each meet- 
ing to be held at their rooms. 

This resolution was passed with a two-fold object, viz., 
(l)to effect some saving in the lodge expenses, and (2) to 
.suit the convenience of the native members who found it 
troublesome to attend at Colaba, the European brethren 
then attached to the lodge being but very few, and as a 
matter of fact some meetings during this year were held 
at Brother Maneckji Cursetji's residence which was kindly 
placed at the disposal of the lodge for that purpose. 

Right Worshipful Brother LeGeyt paid the lodge a 
visit during this year and was received with all honours 
due to him as Past Provincial Grand Master and 
Past Master of the Lodge. A deputation of the Lodge 
Concord also paid a visit and was formally received at a 
meeting held on 29th October. 

A new suit of clothing for the lodge officers from the 
lodge funds was voted during the year. 

Right Worshipful Brother Cartwright was elected 
master for the ensuing year, but he declined to accept the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 125 

honour owing to his other engagements and therefore 
the lodge elected Brother Ardesir Jamsetji Bhajeewalla 
to that exalted office. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji presided as the Worshipful 
Master for the last time at the meeting at which Brother 
Cartwright was elected to succeed him, and the brethren 
one and all present thereat, with one voice and by 
acclamation passed a resolution to present to him in 
addition to an ordinary master's jewel and apron, some- 
thing substantial, worthy of the donors and the acceptor, 
as might be agreeable to the latter, either in the shape 
of a plate, a cup, a portrait or a medal specially to be 
struck in his honour from the lodge funds or partly 
from lodge funds and partly from its members, and a 
Committee consisting of the Worshipful Master-elect, 
the Wardens, Secretary and Treasurer was appointed to- 
give effect to the resolution in such a manner as would be 
acceptable to Brother Maneckji Cursetji and the meeting 
also resolved that an address in suitable terms engrossed 
on vellum conveying the resolution be presented to him 
signed by all the existing members and that the retired 
members of the lodge be requested to sign the same. 
This indeed was a fitting recognition of the very 
laudable endeavours made and the active part taken by 
that worthy Brother in founding the lodge, and con- 
tinuing to take thereafter the most ardent interest in its 
' progress and prosperity in every way and the masterly 
manner in which he had acquitted himself while in the 
chair which he filled for more than two years with great 
credit to himself and honour to the lodge. He had 
attended every meeting of the lodge during the period 
of his mastership and was assisted by a European Bro- 
ther who acted as Past Master, Secretary and Treasurer 
and at times also acted in other offices- The harmony of 
the lodge was maintained and his regime was in every 
way a marked success, and it must have been a matter 



126 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

. of no small gratification at any rate to the native mem- 
bers of the lodge to find that one of them, who was 
the first to become a master of the lodge, so ably and 
.satisfactorily discharged the duties undertaken by him. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji suitably thanked the brethren 
while accepting the high compliment paid to him and 
consented to a portrait of his being placed in the lodge, 
if it. could be done without any large outlay, to remind 
them in after days of him as one who had done his hum- 
ble part in assisting others in establishing this excel- 
lent institution for the special benefit of his countrymen. 
He did not consent to a medal being specially struck in 
his honour, for his services, he said, were not deserving 
of such reward, and as to the plate or cup he said that he 
could not accept the one as he was not a great eater, 
,nor the other, for he was a teetotaller from his infancy, 
.and either article could not be used to his liking. But 
he gave his consent to the portrait on the understanding 
that he should be allowed to present a purse to form a 
charitable fund appertaining to the lodge to which he 
said he would like to see the reserve fund of the lodge 
.added for being devoted to masonic and charitable 
purposes. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

I860. In the year 1860 again there was an increase in 
the number of members by seven. Brothers K. R. Cama 
and Nowroji Nanabhai Framji came back as rejoining 
members. A Brother named J. Wilkinson was elected as 
a joining member, while Framji Cowasjee Mehta, Jalbhai 
Dorabji Umrigar and Munehurji Shapurji Lungrana 
.alias Munsukh were admitted as new members and an 
old Mason, viz.,. Right Worshipful Brother Anderson, was 
elected an honorary member as he had on several occa- 
sions before assisted the lodge by working as a Past 
Master. But against this increase there were four resig- 
nations, viz. t of Brothers Cartwright, Jordan, Mir Jaffer 
AH and Dinsha Dorabji Mehta. Brother Cartwright had 
just then resigned his post of Provincial Grand Master 
and delivered over charge to Right Worshipful Brother 
Balliingal, who was the Deputy Provincial Grand Master, 
and this resignation was communicated by him in a feeling 
letter to the Worshipful Master, Officers and Brothers of 
the lodge. The lodge recorded its sincere regret at the 
resignation and authorized the Right Worshipful Master 
to convey to that worthy Brother its grateful sense of 
.services rendered by him to the Craft and the lodge. It 
also presented to him an address and Founder's Medal 
.and enrolled him as an honorary member and contributed 
Rupees one hundred towards the fund which was started 
by Lodge Perseverance for presenting a plate to that dis- 
tinguished Brother on his retirement. At the first meeting 
held during this year Right Worshipful Brother Ardesir 
Jamsetji was installed as Worshipful Master by the 



128 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Provincial Grand Master and it was announced by the 
latter that in future the lodge should not be opened in all 
degrees on the occasion of the installation of a master as 
had been hitherto done, as it was not necessary to do sa 
in lodges working under the warrant of the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland. The constitutions at the present day 
require the lodge to be opened in all degrees. Brother 
Jordan was presented in open lodge with the Burners 
Medal which was voted to him last year. 

At a meeting held on 21st May the lodge passed a reso- 
lution on a proposition which was brought forward by 
Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama that the initia- 
tion fees should be reduced from Rupees two hundred to* 
Rupees one hundred and the other fees also propor- 
tionately reduced. 

Right Worshipful Brother LeGeyt died during this 
year, and his death was regarded as an uncommon loss r 
and with the object of commemorating it and keeping the 
memory of that revered and excellent Mason alive for 
ever the lodge at its meeting held on 20th July unani- 
mously resolved that the brethren should never cease 
whenever they met at the festive board of the lodge to- 
drink to his memory in solemn silence. 

The financial condition of the lodge w r as steady, for at 
the close of the year the funds amounted to Rs. 1,187-6-0. 

Brother Bhajeewalla was re-elected Master for the 
ensuing year by a majority of votes and was duly re- 
installed at the last meeting of the year. 



1861. The year 1861 passed off quietly. Thirteen 
lodge meetings and seven Standing Committee meetings 
were held. Eleven members were added to the roll, of whom 
one was a rejoining member, namely, Brother Moosa Khan. 
Five were joining members, viz., Brother J. Slynn, J. HL 
Irvine, Henry Bowman, H. Hodgart and A. Faulkner, and 
the remaining five were initiates, namely, Khaja Moohtas 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 129 

Shah, Sorabji Jijibhai Moogana, Burjurji Sorabji Ashbur- 
ner, Dossabhai Framji Karaka and Framji Bomanji. Of 
these Brothers Moosa Khan and Khaja Moohtas Shah 
and Faulkner resigned within a few months. Brother 
Wilkinson also resigned. Brother Khaja Moohtas Shah took 
only two degrees and as he did not understand English 
the proceedings were interpreted to him in Persian. 
Brother Hodgart had just then passed the chair of Lodge 
Perseverance and was an old and experienced Mason 
and Brother Irvine had, it is stated, rendered many a 
good service before to the lodge and both were elected 
by acclamation without being balloted for. Brother 
Faulkner was also similarly elected. There were three 
initiations and three passings and two raisings during the 
year. The finances stood at the end of the year at 
Rs. 1,604-15-2, and which sum included Rs. 636-1-3', bein? 
the cost of the Founder's Medals which the lodge had 
ordered out for members who would like to purchase them 
and were then on hand. A resolution was passed at the 
beginning of this year that the Freemason's Quarterly 
Magazine should be subscribed for by the lodge and circu- 
lated among the members. 

Among the visiting brethren this year were brethren 
from Lion and Lamb No. 227 E. C., St. Mary's Chapel, 
Edinburgh, Derby Lodge No. 102 and Lodge Felix 
No. 355, A donation of Rupees fifty was also made in 
this year to the National Wallace Monument. 

Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama was elected 
Worshipful Master for the next year by a majority of 
votes and he was duly installed by the Provincial Grand 
Master. 



1862. The year of office of this worthy Brother was 
full of events and work and was prosperous in all ways. 
He began his administration in a truly masonic spirit 
and showed by his work and the manner in which he did 



130 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

it that he was a strong disciplinarian who had laid down 
for the guidance of himself and the lodge an unbending 
rule of undeviating obedience to and observance of the 
Bye-laws of the lodge and the fundamental principles on 
which the lodge was established, and strove in every 
respect to maintain the harmony and integrity of the lodge. 
He was unerring in his decisions, which he always gave 
unhesitatingly and enforced strictly, but at times the 
rigour of his action was tempered with leniency engen- 
dered only by a desire to do what was best in the interest 
of the lodge and tended to promote the diffusion of the 
genuine tenets of the Order. He showed a firm grasp of 
all problems and questions that came up before either the 
lodge or the Standing Committee and had on all occasions 
the courage of his convictions, and if one could truly say of 
a Brother, he could certainly so say of this distinguished 
Brother, that he was the second man and mason after 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji who, walking in the pa,th of 
masonic rectitude and measuring his stepson sure and firm 
ground and guiding the thoughts of himself and the 
brethren in general, whose happiness was his great 
design to promote, within the very compass of propriety 
held himself forth and justly proved by his fair and 
square conduct a worthy pattern for imitation, and if 
proof were wanted in support of all this it was furnished 
by the fact that the brethren over whom he ruled for 
twelve months re-elected him the Worshipful Master for 
the succeeding year. 

He was present at every meeting both of the lodge and 
the Standing Committee and at all the meetings useful 
work was done. In all twenty meetings of the general 
body were held, of which eight were emergent and the re- 
maining twelve were regular meetings. The Standing 
Committee meetings numbered fourteen. There were ten 
initiations, five passings and four raisings, and every 
Brother initiated, passed or raised had invariably the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S. 131 

benefit of a lecture on the tracing board appertaining to 
the degree given to him by the Worshipful Master. Also 
at meetings where no degree work was done the Right 
Worshipful Master delivered lectures on the tracing 
boards. Numerically and financially there was a sub- 
stantial increase. Twenty-one members were enrolled, of 
whom four were rejoining brethren, nine initiates, six 
affiliates and two honorary members- 

The rejoining Brethren were brothers Dinsha Dorabji 
Mehta, Hormusji Pestonji Framji, Nowroji Maneckji 
Lungrana and Munshi Akbar Ali Khan. The initiates were 
Pestonji Hormusji Cama, Sorabji Pestonji Framji, Mirza 
Mahomad Ali Khan (Consul-General of the Persian Govern- 
ment), Sorabji Shapurji Bengali, Ardesir Framji Moos, 
Dr. Rustomji Cowasji Bahadur ji, Jehangir Gustadji, 
Cumroodin Tyabji (Solicitor), Cursetji Jehangir Liccimna 
alias Tarachand. The affiliates were Brothers Robert R. 
Balmore and Alexander F. Angus both of Lodge Perse- 
verance, Muncherji Frommurze of Lodge Industry and 
Perseverance, No. 126 E. C., Sorabji Frommurze of 
Lodge Star of Burmah No. 897 E. C., Merwanji Bomanji 
of Lodge Neptune No. 22 of London, and Solomon David 
of Northern Lodge of China No. 832. The honorary 
members were Brothers Meding of Lodge Sincere and 
Amity of Paris, also a representative of the Grand 
Lodge of Saxony in the Grand Orient of France, and 
Right Worshipful Brother Lord Leigh, the Grand Master 
of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Warwickshire, The 
honorary} membership was conferred on Brother Meding 
in recognition of his having shown every brotherly soli- 
citation and kindness to Right Worshipful Brother K. R. 
Cama while he was temporarily residing in Paris in 
1859, and was a perfect stranger to him and had no claims 
on him except that of his being one of the mystic tie. 

Brother Lord Leigh was made an honorary member 
in appreciation of the most marked attention and f rater- 



132 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

nal consideration with which Brother Maneckji Cursetji 
was received by his Grand Lodge while that Brother 
visited Warwickshire during this year. Four members 
resigned during the year,tn*2., Brothers Bhajeewalla, S. C. 
Sayer, Angus and Balmore. The address and apron and 
jewel which had been voted to Brother Maneckji Cursetji 
on 19th December 1859 had for some reason or other not 
been presented to him yet. He was going to Europe on a 
six months' leave to seek rest anH recreation from official 
work (for he was at and for some years before this time 
a judge of the Bombay Small Causes Court) and for the 
education of his children and occasion was therefore 
taken to present the address before his departure and 
this was done at an emergent meeting held on 25th April 
which was largely attended by almost all the members 
and a large number of visiting brethren. A copy of the 
address as also a copy of the reply thereto by Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji are set out ini Appendix J, The address 
recounted the valuable services which had been rendered 
by the worthy Brother to the Craft and the lodge and said 
that he was a perfect ashlar whereupon to try and adjust 
the masonic opinions and actions of the brethren and had 
been a sincere friend of the lodge as much in the days 
of its adversity as in those of its prosperity. 

The apron and jewel had not arrived from England and 
the portrait was also still coming from China and there- 
fore the former could not be presented or the latter hung 
up in the lodge rooms. Brother Maneckji Cursetji re- 
plied in suitable terms and referred to the facts relating 
to the foundation of the lodge and his humble efforts in 
that behalf and assured the brethren that his connection 
with the lodge would never be severed and said that he 
would place in the hands of the Secretary a sum equiva- 
lent to the amount spent by the lodge on his portrait to 
form a nucleus fund for charitable purposes, and in 
order that the lodge funds might not suffer, and the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 133 

lodge subsequently did get from him a donation of Rupees 
two hundred and fifty. He then also proposed that the 
Burne's Medal should be presented to the Grand Master 
of England, Brother George Oliver, the Historian of 
the Craft, and to the Worshipful Master of the Lodge La 
Glorie de FUnivers de Paris in which he first saw the 
light of Freemasonry. The Right Worshipful Master 
doubted whether such a proposition could be made at an 
emergent meeting and said that at the next meeting he 
would see that it was made and if carried that he would 
forward the medals to him in England for presentation, 
and at the next regular meeting resolutions were passed 
for presenting the medals to those distinguished Masons 
and also to the Grand Master of French Masons, and to 
a Brother named T. P. Sirget, Worshipful Master of 
Lodge Sincere and Amity, who got the medal in recogni- 
tion of the brotherly regards he had shown to the 
Right Worshipful Master while in Paris in 1859. 

Brother Oliver had, it appears, taken a notice of the 
lodge in very flattering terms in his new Edition of 
Preston just then published. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji was then duly commissioned 
to present the medals in person to the distinguished 
brethren and he executed the commission by making the 
presentation to Brother Sirget in person and to the others 
by letters as he could not see them. The presentation 
was acknowledged by letters which were handed by Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji to the lodge on his return to Bombay, 
and were read at the meeting held on 20th November and 
copied in the minutes thereof and are in very touching 
and cordial terms. (See Appendix K.) Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji was present at this meeting and was thanked for 
the excellent manner in which the commission had been 
carried out by him and he informed the lodge that he had 
been received by the Grand Lodge of Warwickshire and 
particularly by its Grand Master, Lord Leigh/with marked 



134 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

attention and fraternal regards, whereupon Lord Leigh 
was upon his proposition elected an honorary member 
and was voted the Burners Medal. 

The revision of the Bye-laws of the lodge was the first 
thing taken in hand by Right Worshipful Brother K. R. 
Cama at the commencement of his office. An emergent 
meeting was called by him for the purpose and the 
Bye-laws were discussed thereat and a number of modi- 
fications and alterations were proposed for consideration 
at the subsequent regular meeting, and one of them was 
to raise the standard of fees for the three degrees and 
for affiliation by exactly doubling them and reducing the 
rejoining fee from Rupees fifteen to ten and raising the 
fees of Rupees forty-five and fifty-five for passing and 
raising a Brother initiated in another lodge to Rupees 
fifty-five and Rupees seventy-five respectively. At the 
next regular meeting the revised Bye-laws were discussed 
and passed except the one relating to the alteration in the 
fees. At a subsequent meeting held on 21st April, 1862, 
it was resolved that the Bye-laws should be printed and 
a sketch of the history of the Lodge be added to it and 
the Right Worshipful Master undertook to compile it and 
to see the same go through the press. The year went by 
but as the Worshipful Master stated while rendering an 
account of his stewardship, the Bye-laws were not printed 
because the translation thereof was not ready and he, the 
Right Worshipful Master, could not compile the sketch 
because he found the old papers in a mess, all in a heap, 
and not arranged properly though he had , he said, taken 
down notes and references which he intended to give to 
the next coming master for being expanded. Revision 
of the Bye-laws was accompanied by a rigid observance 
of them and here the presiding officer was a task-master 
though strict, yet just. The members had become 
somewhat indiff errent as to regular attendance and 
did not send excuses for their non-attendance at Lodge- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3^2 S.C. 135 

Meetings as required by the Bye-laws. The first thing, 
therefore, that the Master did, was to have a 2V. B. added 
at foot of the summons for the very first meeting of the 
year calling the attention of the brethren to the rule 
which required them to send an excuse for absence either 
in writing or verbal. This had not the desired effect for 
still some members did not send excuses and the master 
thereupon intimated in open lodge that such brethren 
would be dealt with as the Bye-laws provided, as he was 
determined to govern the lodge strictly in conformity 
with the intention thereof. Matters improved, for the 
attendances became more regular than before and excuses 
came either in writing or through members attending ; 
but still some members were refractory. The majority 
of the brethren then proposed that a fine not exceeding 
Rupees five should be imposed while a few thought it 
would be difficult to exact fines and by such a hard step 
the lodge might lose some of its members. Ultimately 
all agreed that a fine should be imposed on members absent- 
ing themselves without sending excuses but after previous 
notice and default on their part for one month in 
attending thereto. 

The Right Worshipful! Master still hoped that the 
discussion and resolution when brought to the notice of 
the members would be quite sufficient and probably 
obviate the necessity of inflicting fines but unfortunately 
his hope was not realised and later on he had to inflict 
a fine of one rupee on brethren, European and Native 
alike, and the fines were in all cases paid, and in the 
case of some brethren who subsequently rendered satis- 
factory explanations were also kindly remitted. The 
Right Worshipful Master's view was that every master 
undertook a solemn obligation to observe the Bye-laws 
and was bound to render and enforce obedience to them 
so long as they existed and remained in force. One 
Brother wrote explaining his absence but at the same 



136 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

time tendered his resignation because he was fined. The 
Right Worshipful Master accepted the explanation and said 
that the fine if recovered should be refunded but a t the 
same time said that though the member had shown very 
little attachment to the lodge by tendering his resignation 
and the lodge would lose very little by his withdrawal 
(for he had attended a meeting only once in three years) ; 
yet he thought he would be encouraging members to re- 
sign at trifles if he allowed that resignation to be accept- 
ed and made a precedent of and desired that member to re- 
consider the resignation which was characterised as being 
due to his imperfect acquaintance with the ancient masonic 
charges which required a Mason at all timesi to belong to 
some lodge or other ; and the resignation was not accepted. 
Another Brother who was fined wrote two letters which 
it appears contained matter, which if placed before the 
lodge, would have induced it to decide against the 
Brother and probably to expel him from the lodge, but 
the Right Worshipful Master who was supported in his 
views by Brother Maneckji Cursetji did not allow the 
letters to be read in open lodge though one Brother 
wanted to know what they contained and gave that 
Brother a week to withdraw the letters with a diistinct 
intimation that if he failed to do so they would be read 
in open lodge as a matter of course and dealt with in the 
proper way, and stated to the lodge that he had made per- 
sonal efforts in bringing round the erring Brother to the 
right path of respect, duty and allegiance towards the 
lodge, and his efforts did prove effectual in the end, for 
that Brother paid the fine imposed on him with a letter 
submitting to the Bye-laws and explaining the cause of 
his absence for which he was fined. The letter was read 
and the explanation accepted at the meeting at which 
Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama relinquished his 
office and he openly said that he retired from the chair 
quite content with all brethren, without exception. 



OF WElSfEitfi INDIA No. 342 S.C. 137 

The Bye-laws were also strictly enforced in the matter 
of fees and admission of members. 

Before his time all affiliates had been somehow or other 
charged only Rupees two per month contrary ta the 
Bye-laws and he therefore announced at the very second 
meeting of the year that; he would in confirmity with 
the Bye-laws enforce in regard to them the monthly sub- 
scription of Rupees four without any distinction. 

As regards admission of new members his view was 
that the lodge should not be sorry if ninty-nine good 
men out of hundred men were rejected in order that even 
one bad person might not by chance be admitted into the 
Craft and his procedure was to obtain from a proposer 
the name of his candidate then to submit the name to the 
senior office-bearers and to make due enquiry as minutely 
as he could into the social status and personal character 
of the candidate, and if approved of, then to allow him 
to be proposed in open lodge. According to the Bye- 
laws the proposition would again go before the Standing 
Committee for report and here was another opportunity 
of approving or rejecting a candidate, according to the 
result of further inquiries or upon such information as 
might then be available. This in a great measure pre- 
cluded the chances of a candidate being black-hailed 
and ensured the admission of good men and true. 

An instance occurred which showed how strict the 
Right Worshipful Master was and also his sense of 
justice. A candidate who had been favourably reported 
upon by the Standing Committee was to be balloted for at 
a meeting. That very day the Right Worshipful Master 
had received some information prejudicially affecting 
his character and he therefore proposed that the ballot 
should be postponed pending further inquiries which he 
and others would make, as that would better serve the 
interest of the candidate than taking the ballot imme- 
diately, and after some discussion the proposer and 

10 



138 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

seconder agreed to the postponement. In the meantime 
the Right Worshipful Master made further inquiries and 
found that the information given to him was not correct. 
The candidate was brought up for ballot again and 
before it was taken the Worshipful Master said his 
inquiries had resulted favourably to the candidate. The 
ballot was taken and there were two bla^k-balls. It was 
therefore suggested that there was some mistake and 
the ballot should be taken again. The Right Worshipful 
Master rose equal to the occasion and repeated his own 
belief that the candidate was worthy of being admitted 
and ordered a second ballot but reminded the brethren at 
the same time that it was their imperative duty to exclude 
improper and unworthy men and to reject the candidate 
if they suspected aught against him. The second ballot 
was quite clear and the candidate was duly elected and 
he in course of time had an opportunity of ruling the 
lodge and serving it in more ways than one and to its great 
advantage. He has since settled his claim of mortality 
and has left his name imperishable in the list of the Past 
Masters of this lodge. He was Brother Jehangir 
Gustadji. 

Brother K. R. Cama also wanted the brethren to be 
efficient in their work and in candidates for the three 
degrees he exacted a strict examination before advan- 
cing them from one degree to another. With that view 
he used to hold private meetings regularly every week 
with the principal office-bearers at which Entered Ap- 
prentices were invited to receive instruction. He was 
in the first place not anxious to increase the number 
indiscriminately and in the second place not to confer 
degrees without satisfying himself that a Brother really 
deserved advancement. The proceedings of some lodge 
meetings were also interpreted in Persian and Gujarati 
for the edification of those members who understood 
English imperfectly. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 139 

The finances of the lodge were in a prosperous condi- 
tion and the lodge therefore ordered out at the initiative 
of Brother Cama a complete set of masonic books of 
Brother Dr. Oliver, costing about Rupees three hundred, 
to form a lodge library for the use of the members who 
were to have the privilege of using one set of books 
each time, which they were not to retain for more than 
a week. Some of these books form a part of the present 
library of the lodge. 

At the close of the year the funds were Rupees 1504-1-6 
including Rupees 498-4-0 to the credit of the Charity 
Fund which now under the Bye-laws was made up of 
one-fourth of the subscriptions. A jewel and an address 
had been voted to the Immediate Past Master but some 
unpleasant circumstances having come to the knowledge 
of Brother Cama, and the Immediate Past Master though 
called upon to render an explanation having failed to do 
so they were withheld. 

A question had arisen as to whether the minutes of a 
regular meeting could be legally confirmed at a sub- 
sequent emergent meeting arid after discussion it was 
decided by a ruling of the Worshipful Master that only 
such portion of the minutes could be confirmed as related 
to the subject of the emergent meeting. 

At a private meeting of a few brethren about Rupees 
40,000 were subscribed this year on the suggestion of 
Brother Cama for building a Masonic Hall for the lodge. 
Having had subsequently to leave Bombay he handed the 
list to the next master with a request to follow up the mat- 
ter and to mature the plan, but nothing furtiher was done. 

A plan and estimate of a Masonic Hall had been sub- 
mitted to the lodge for its views by Lodge Perseverance 
in August, 1861, and the Lodge had therefore resolved 
that the matter should be referred to a Committee con- 
sisting of the Masters, Past Masters and Wardens of all 
lodges working in Bombay, 



140 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

A Brother was not allowed to be raised during this 
year as it appears he had said something derogatory 
to the lodge to some gentlemen, non-Masons, and 
though called upon to withdraw his aspersions had 
declined to do so. 

Brother K. R. Cama was re-elected Worshipful Master 
for the ensuing year by a large majority of votes. He 
was reluctant to accept the honour but on being earnest- 
ly asked to do so did not press his refusal. Circumstan- 
ces however soon changed. He had to leave Bombay on 
a tour in India and he therefore called an emergent 
meeting for the purpose of electing a new master. Here 
again a question arose as to whether a master could be 
elected at an emergent meeting, and Brother Cama ruled 
that that could be done and in that opinion the lodge 
concurred. Brother M. M. Sethna was elected master 
by a magority of votes and was duly installed a : t the last 
meeting of the year held on 20th December, 1862, by the 
retiring master., who took that occasion also to impress 
on the installed Worshipful Master and the brethren his 
views about governing a lodge and enforcing discipline 
among the members and promised the brethren that 
he would in future always work and assist them to the 
best of his ability, a promise which it must be admitted 
he most amply fulfilled till his death in 1909. He was 
highly applauded by the brethren and voted a Past Master's 
Jewel and Apron and he in his turn presented the large 
folio vol. of the Zend Avesta by Professor Westergard 
on which have been obligated the Parsi brethren of the 
lodge up to the present time. 

At this meeting the lodge recorded its deepest regret 
at the death of Rev. Brother Dr. Burnes, which was an- 
nounced by Brother Maneckji Cursetji who also suggested 
that his name should be coupled in solemn silence at the 
festive board with that of the late Right Worshipful 
Brother P. W. LeGeyt. 



CHAPTER XIV. 

1863 As predicted by the Right Worshipful Brother 
Cama, his successor was not strict in the enforcement of 
discipline and the result of his laxity was that the 
members were again irregular in their attendance at 
lodge meetings. 

During his regime there was not a single resignation 
while the addition to the roll of members was eight of 
which three were rejoining members, viz., Brothers D. 
B. Pesikakana, Dadabhai Nowroji and J. B. Kola ; four 
were initiates, namely, Messrs. Dossabhai Hormusji 
Cama, Jijibhai Jehangir Lam, Muncherji Cowasji Murza- 
ban and Framji Nusserwanji Sett, and one was an 
honorary member. 

Brother M. C. Murzaban came with a letter of recom- 
mendation on Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama 
from Brother J. D. Sharman the Worshipful Master of 
Lodge St. Andrews in the East which was placed before 
the lodge, whereupon and upon the Right Worshipful 
Master's statement that he was on enquiry found worthy 
of being admitted into the fraternity he was formally 
proposed thereafter and duly elected. He at present is 
the oldest subscribing member of this lodge and will 
complete his 50 years of masonic life on the 20th of 
August, 1913. 

The honorary member was Right Worshipful Brother 
Richard Bolton Barton, who had just then become 
Provincial Grand Master of Western India on Brother 
Ballingal relinquishing the office of Officiating Provincial 
Grand Master of Western India which he had filled from 



142 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

1861. That Brother attended thereafter several Meetings 
of the lodge and took a keen interest in its affairs and 
as will be seen later on received special recognition from 
the lodge. 

The degree work done during the year consisted of 
three initiations, four passings and three raisings. 

Lodge Truth had then b2en recently consecrated and 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji had the honour of being elect- 
ed an honorary member thereof and he thought that the 
Lodge Rising Star was bo and to reciprocate the compli- 
ment on personal as well as masonic grounds and with 
that view proposed two brethren of eminence and stand- 
ing and well-skilled in the Craft who were Past Provin- 
cial Grand Masters of Bengal and also members of Lodge 
Perseverance as honorary members, namely Brothers 
Judge and Wickham as, though those brethren^ 
under the original compact with Lodge Perseverance 
(which at this date was still observed by Lodge Rising 
Star in spite of Lodge Perseverance having rescinded 
it evidently under an impression that its numbers who 
then mustered about eighty would inconvenience them) 
were entitled to attend the meetings of the lodge as 
extra members, felt a delicacy, which was but quite 
natural, to attend too often. The Master supported the 
proposition as did also another member. The feeling 
was however not unanimous, whereupon the proposition 
was abandoned and Brother Maneckji Cursetji left the 
meeting as he. took their rejection as an insult. It ap- 
pears that Brother Judge was proposed without his con- 
sent and in order therefore that his high position in 
masonry might not suffer by reason of the mistake of 
the Brother who had made the proposition a member 
proposed at a following meeting that the minutes regard 
ing the election should be expunged from the records 
A discussion ensued but the minutes were confirmed a s 
the lodge was not in fault for having voted and the 



WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 143 

matter was one which required adjustment between 
Brothers Judge and Maneckji Cursetji. Brother Judge 
coming to know of his rejection also wrote to the master 
contending that the proposition having been made with- 
out his consent or knowledge, the voting on it was null 
and void and protesting against any record of the 
transaction being entered in the minutes. Corres- 
pondence also passed between him and Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji on the subject, but all the same the lodge did 
not accede to the request, but the correspondence was 
ordered to be recorded to do justice to Brother Judge 
in the matter. (See Appendix L.) Brother Judge's letter 
to Brother Maneckji Cursetji inter alia referred to the un- 
pleasant fact that at that time there was wholesale black- 
balling in Lodge Perseverence of members of Lodge Rising 
Star wishing to join it and said that probably Lodge 
Rising Star black-balled him out of a sheer desire to 
take revenge. But the record of the transaction shows 
that that was not the reason and the matter was not one 
of revenge but the two brethren were not accepted for 
other reasons which were purely personal to them. The 
members did not allow themselves to be influenced by 
the circumstance of the high masonic position of the 
brethren proposed or the fact of the proposer being no 
other than the greatest friend of the lodge and the pro- 
bability of his being offended at the rejection of his pro- 
position, which as a fact happened, but were guided solely 
by the desire to avoid the least possibility of the harmony 
and peace of the lodge being disturbed by the admission 
of brethren against whom they had an objection. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji shortly thereafter lost his 
eldest son Mr. Hiraji. The Worshipful Master called a 
lodge of emergency to specially express their sympathy 
in the sad bereavement. Some of the brethren thought 
that was uncalled for and entirely without precedent but 
Brother K. R. Cama in supporting the master's action 



144 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING S?Att 

asserted that the master had a perfect right to call such 
an emergent meeting and that th e brethren were bound 
on any occassion arising to show to the world by their 
actions that they were not Masons in name only but were 
Masons in spirit and reality who rejoiced with & Brother 
in his joys and mourned with him in his sorrows and that 
it did not follow, as some brethren thought, that because 
such a meeting was held in one case that it should neces- 
sarily be held in anot'her, but that each case stood upon 
its own circumstances and a Brother who had done 
service in a marked manner was entitled to receive 
sympathy at their hands in the same manner. He quoted 
the instance of a lodge in France to which he was affili- 
ated in which a Brother's wife being sick during labour 
a deputation was actually sent from the lodge to make 
inquiries after her health; and when she was safely deli- 
vered the brethren testified their joy by giving a battery 
of salute. The brethren assembled then unanimously 
passed a resolution recording their deep regret and 
sorrow at the lamentable death and offering Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji their heartfelt condolence and sym- 
pathy. Only a few days before that the lodge had passed 
a resolution at a regular meeting condoling with Brother 
K. R. Cama in his bereavement caused by the death of 
his wife. 

During the year Brother J, C. Tarachand who was 
travelling on the continent, visited Lodge Anglais No. 204 
of Bourdeaux at a special Convocation called in his 
honour and was received with marked attention, and 
that lodge in token of their love for Lodge Rising Star 
presented a medal to him and also handed another 
and a list of its members to Brother Tarachand to be 
presented to the lodge. Brother Tarachand in advance 
of his return sent both the medal and the list to the 
lodge through Brother Dadabhoy Nowroji who was then 
in England, and on his return carried out his mission by 



WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 145 

making a presentation of the Medal to the Worshipful 
Master in open lodge assembled and the lodge passed a 
unanimous vote of thanks to Lodge Anglais for the honour 
and fraternal affection shown by them. 

Brother Tarachand had also been treated very kindly 
by Viscount de Brons of Bordeaux and Lodge Mareschal 
Magiria at Paris. 

The Masonic Temple question was again mooted this 5 
year, and discussed at the lodge meeting held on 20th 
August, The representatives of all the English lodges 
it appears had decided at .a meeting that a Masonic 
Temple should be built for the use of all bodies whether 
under the English, Scotch or Irish Banner and appointed 
a deputation to wait on His Excellency the Governor of 
Bombay requesting him to become the Patron of the Order 
in Bombay and his co-operation in the selection of a site l 
for the Temple and a further meeting was to be held on 
28th August. Brother King, the Grand Secretary, who was 
present at the meeting referred to the subject and asked 
the lodge to depute a representative at the said meeting. 

It appears that anothe.r scheme had also been started 
in which the Worshipful Master had been invited to join 
and the project of Brother Cama had been allowed by 
-him to drop and the Worshipful Master said it was 
difficult to decide what to do. 

Brother Cama while appreciating the idea and em- 
phasising the common desire of all Masons to have a 
Masonic Hall expressed his opinion that to cut the gordion 
knot it would after all be better for the lodge to build a 
hall of its own which could be used by all other masonic 
bodies under any banner on payment of a small rent, as 
he believed that the members who had last year at his 
initiative subscribed Rupees forty thousand could if they 
so chose consummate the project by employing their 
money or lands in the erection of a Temple which after all 
would be a paying investment. Brother Cama was how- 

19 



146 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ever deputed to attend the meeting to see what was best 
to be done under the circumstances. 

Two of the visiting brethren this year hailed from 
Lodge Dido Paix and Lodge St. David, Dundee. 

Brother Muncherji Cowasji Lungrana presented to the 
lodge this year a copy of his valuable work " The Ganj 
Nameh. " 



CHAPTER XV- 

1864. Worshipful Brother Nowroji Nanabhoy Framji 
was the Worshipful Master in 1864 and for the first time 
now all the offices were captured by the native brethren 
and all of them, Parsis. 

13 lodge meetings and 8 standing committee 
meetings were held and the degree work was two 
initiations, 4 passings and 5 raisings. No member left 
the fold but on the contrary two returned to it, namely, 
Brothers Dadabhoy Nowroji and Maneckji Limji Anteria. 
The numerical strength was further increased by the 
admission of three initiates, namely, Nowroji Furdoonji, 
Jehangir Merwanji Pleader and Jamsetji Furdoonji 
Unwalla, and one affiliate, viz, Brother Cursetji Fromnv 
ruze hailing from Lodge Zetland in the East No. 748 
Singapore. 

Brother J. M. Pleader had been rejected on two succes- 
sive ballots in the preceding year and his case was then 
considered very unfortunate by several members, notably 
the Right Worshipful Master and Brother A. F. Moos 
who severely deprecated the practice of blackballing 
deserving candidates like Brother Pleader who were 
respectable, useful and able men. The lodge must no 
doub't have thought over the matter and considered it 
but right to receive Brother Pleader who as a fact proved 
to be a zealous, able and useful working member. 

Brother Cama was presented with a Past Master's 
jewel and appointed the first depute Master of the lodge, 
a post which he filled successfully for some years with 
great energy. He said on this occasion that his great 



148 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ambition was and would be to sea that the lodge attained 
perfection under native office-bearers. 

Brother A. F. Moos was presented with the Founder's 
medal in recognition of the trouble taken by him in trans- 
lating the Bye-laws and getting them printed. There are 
at present in the lodge library several printed copies of 
these Bye-laws with their Gujrati translation. 

Brother Cowasji Sorabji Patel requested the lodge to 
be allowed to dedicate to it a work he had written on 
" Chronology " but the dedication was refused with 
thanks on the ground that the work did not relate to a 
masonic subject. 

"Masonic Manual' 1 presented by a Brother named 
Hains was accepted with thanks and the lodge became a 
subscriber to the Scottish Freemasons' Magazine from 
the very beginning of that Journal and the proceedings 
of the lodge, it was resolved, should after approval 
thereof by the Grand Secretary be furnished to the 
Magazine. 

His Grace Augustus Frederick John, the Duke of 
Athole,K.T.,the Grand Master Mason of the Grand Lodge 
of Scotland and the beloved and illustrious head of the 
Craft at the time, had just then passed away into eter- 
nity and the lodge feeling itself bound by every motive of 
duty and gratitude passed a resolution at its meeting held 
on 20th February recording the melancholy event with 
deep regret and paid funeral honours to the deceased in 
solemn silence. 

Lodge Perseverance asked this year for an increased 
rent for the use of the lodge rooms at Colaba and it was 
agreed to. 

It was announced that the necessary land for the 
erection of a Masonic Temple had been agreed to be 
purchased and that the Temple would be called " The 
Framji Cowasji Masonic Hall " after the illustrious 
grandfather of the Worshipful Master who though not 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 149 

initiated into the Craft was by his acts and deeds a 
Mason- 

The financial condition of the lodge was now again bad. 
It was on the wrong side but it must be said that the 
lodge had made substantial donations in charity during the 
year which must have in a degree contributed to this fail. 
The Worshipful Master in retiring from the chair made a 
donation of Rupees two hundred and had also previously 
advanced a loan of Rupees five hundred to defray the 
current expenditure. 

In order to meet the increased expenditure the 
monthly subscription was raised from Rupees four to 
Rupees five and all the other fees were doubled. 

1865. Brother D. R. Kola was the Worshipful 
Master in the year 1865. During his regime the lodge 
became a subscriber to the Indian Journal of Free. 
masonry and the Freemasons' Magazine and Masonic 
Mirror published in London and the members continued 
to take an interest in masonic journals and were it 
seems making use of the lodge library. 

Four Brothers were affiliated, namely, Brothers F. L. 
Brown, H. H. Avron, Dadabhai Dinsha Ghaiidhi, and 
Henry Prescott. There was only one initiate and he was 
the late Mr. Framji Rustomji Vicaji, Barrister-at-Law, 
who as is well known passed away from this mortal 
world in July 1908. Brother Burjorji Sorabji Ashburner 
rejoined while Brother J. H. Irvine resigned. Brother 
Prescott, presented to the lodge a picture of Brother Dr. 
Oliver which was thankfully accepted. 

The late eminent high priest of the Deccan, Dastur 
Hoshangji Jamaspji, was proposed this year for initiation 
by Brother K. R. Cama but as in those days there 
was still in the native mind a prejudice against Free < 
masonry generally and the orthodox section of the Parsi 
community had a belief that it had a great affinity to 
Christianity^, the proposal was allowed to stand over for 



150 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

two or three months in order to allow the news to spread 
and to enable the learned Dastur to gauge the views of 
his constituents by the subject being fully ventilated 
and then to decide finally whether he would join the 
Order or not. Subsequently however Brother Cama 
withdrew his proposition but the fact that the eminent 
Dastur had allowed it to be made was indeed a great 
refutation in itself of the bigoted view taken against 
the noble institution of Freemasonry. 

In all there were 13 lodge meetings and 10 standing 
committee meetings. There were two initiations three 
passings and three raisings. The finances went however 
from bad to worse and subscriptions had to be raised 
from amongst the members to pay off debts and to 
leave a small surplus in hand. But at the same time 
it appears the lodge had all along continued to make 
charitable donations and did not alter the Bye-laws 
under which one-fourth of the subscriptions went to the 
charity fund though some of the members wanted the 
proportion still further reduced. 

All Past Masters of the lodge were elected by Lodge 
Concord of instruction as its honorary members during 
this year. 

The Bye-laws of the lodge were amended at a lodge 
meeting held on 20th November and inter aiia those 
relating to the extra-membership granted to members of 
other lodges were rescinded, so that from this time for- 
ward the members of other lodges were admitted as 
affiliates upon the same terms as the intrants. The rule 
relating to honorary membership was also now altered 
by providing that a proposition for the same should be 
decided by ballot and not by show of hands as before and 
the rule relating to the holding of anniversary meetings 
was amended by providing that they should be held on 
15th December in each year, that being the anniversary 
day. The present rules in these matters are to the same 



OF WKSTLJRN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 151 

effect. The offices of Jeweller, Architect, Bearer of the 
Sacred Volume, and Organist were added for the first 
time to the list of office-bearers. 

The proposals made by Brother Nowroji Nanabhai 
Framji in the previous year regarding the Masonic Hall 
and the suggestions of Brother K. R. Cama in connection 
therewith were further considered on the same being 
revised by Brother K. R. Cama and a prospectus was 
issued to and circulated amongst the members for 
raising a capital of Rs. 1,25,000 divided into 250 shares 
of Rs. 500 each and announcing that Brother N. N. 
Framji had expressed his resolution to subscribe one 
hundred shares in consideration of the Hall being named 
after his revered Grandfather Mr. Framji Cowasji and 
requesting the brethren to take up the remaining 150 
shares and providing that the net income to be derived 
from rent, fees, etc, from the us,e of the building for 
masonic and other purposes would be divided among the 
shareholders. 

The lodge had by this time had the honour of having 
its members nominated to posts in the Provincial Grand 
Lodge. Brother K. R. Cama was the Provincial Grand 
Secretary and Brother C. N. Cama was the Honorary 
Provincial Grand Treasurer. Brother C. N. Cama had 
presented the clothing and jewels of the Provincial Grand 
Lodge office-bearers and they were worn by them for the 
first time on 7th January 1865. 

The proceedings of the lodge were published during 
the year in the Masonic Record after being approved by 
the Provincial Grand Secretary. 

At a Grand Lodge communication held on 29th June 
1SG5 Brother Barton in his address as Provincial Grand 
Master ref cred to the practice which had grown up of not 
exercising ordinary caution in admitting candidates for 
initiation and to cases of Masons brought up for trial be- 
fore him as a Magistrate and in doing so said that he did 



152 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

not in the least mean to insinuate against any particular 
lodge as permitting the objectionable practice but 
would instance, as an example of what should be done, 
the Lodge Rising Star where the strictest scrutiny was 
made before a candidate was proposed or initiated- 

Brother Cursetji Nusserwanji Cama offered this year 
to present to the lodge the necessary clothing of office- 
bearers and members with a set of jewels in silver and 
this munificent offer was accepted with a request to that 
Brother to allow the inscription " Presented to Lodge 
Rising Star of Western India No. 342 by Brother C. N 
Camaji " being engraved if not on all the jewels at least 
on those of the Master and Wardens. That worthy 
Brother at first objected but ultimately reluctantly as- 
sented to the request and the clothing and jewels were 
in due course ordered out from England. The clothing 
at that time included sashes for the office-bearers. 

Bro Nowroji Nanabh i Framji was selected Worship- 
ful Master for the next year by a majority of votes but 
he declined to accept the office and thereupon the 
brethren proceeded to a fresh election at which 
Brothers K. R. Cama and C. J. Tarachand got an equal 
number of votes. Brother Cama then said that the .Past 
Masters of the lodge were its pillars and the greater the 
number of them was the better the strength of the lodge, 
and it was not, therefore advisable to elect a Past Master. 
The ballot had therefore to be gone over again and 
resulted in a majority of votes for Brother Tarachand 
who was subsequently duly installed by the Provincial 
Grand Master. At the end of the year there were 
forty-two subscribing members. 



CHAPTER XVI- 



1866. The year 1866 was not very eventful, but it was 
full of work, viz, seven initiations, five passings and four 
raisings. It also attracted fifteen new members of whom 
nine were initiates and six affiliates. 

The initiates were Messrs. Darasha Ratanji Chichgar 
(who has since proved himself an ardent and useful 
member), Cursetji Rustomji Sethna (the father of our 
present members, Right Worshipful Brothers P. C. Sethna 
and D. C. Sethna ), Jamsetji Dhanjibhai Wadia, Dr. 
Rustomji Jamsetji Nadirshaw, Hormusji Dadabhai ( then 
a pleader and later on a Judge of the Bombay Small 
Causes Court ) , Dr. Cursetji Framji Khory, Pestanji 
Dajibhai, Rustomji Sorabji Punegar and Sorabji Palanji. 

Brother Dr. Nadirshaw entered the lodge under circum- 
stances similar to those which had happened in the case 
of Brother Jehangir Merwanji Pleader. He had been 
disapproved at two consecutive ballots taken "when he 
was previously proposed eleven months before this, and 
his disapproval had ~ been the occasion of an animated 
animadversion by some membfers on the conduct of the 
brethren who had exercised their right of veto. 

The affiliates were Brothers Framji Dorabji Bahadurji, 
Nowroji Dajibhai Unvalla and Hormusji Nowroji 
Saklatwala, all hailing from Lodge Zetland of Hongkong, 
China, No. 525 E. C., Brother Edulji Co was ji Jussa walla, 
an initiate of Lodge Morning Star of Lucknow No. 552, 
Brother Rustomji Hirjibhai Wadia hailing from Lodge 
Mountbank No.286 of the United States of America, and 

Brother Rustomji Pestonji Soorty of Lodge Gresham 

10B 



164 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

No. 869 E. Co Brother Jussa walla subsequently took his 
second and third degrees in the lodge. 

Brothers Aaron, Prescot, F. L. Brown, Cursetji 
Frommnrze, Muncherji Frommurze, Hodgart, A. M. 
Gubbay, and Jalbhai Dorabji Umrigar resigned. Brothers 
Bowman's and Solomon David's names were struck out 
for default in payment of lodge dues. 

The clothing and silver jewels which Brother C. N. 
Cama had ordered out arrived from England this year 
and were presented to the lodge which out of gratitude 
conferred on him the title or appellation of Honorary 
Depute Master of the lodge and also voted to him the 
Burnes MedaL Brother K. R. Cama was still holding 
the office of Depute Master since it was created. He was 
also, during this year, the Provincial Grand Secretary. 

Brother N N. Framji had by this time purchased a 
piece of land at Bellassis Road, admeasuring about 
10,800 square yards for the benefit of the lodge which he 
had, however, not conveyed to the lodge. Subsequently 
to the purchase, however, he unfortunately fell on bad 
days with others with whom he was previously carrying 
on business but this did not prevent his carrying out his 
obligation and he offered to convey the land to the lodge 
along with the trustees of his estate and, as will be seen 
later on, the conveyance was duly taken. 

It had come to the notice of some members that certain 
native residents of Bombay failing to get admittance into 
the lodge or apprehending from common reports of the 
lodge being very strict in its choice of members that they 
would not be accepted even if they made an attempt were 
proceeding to Poona for the express purpose of becoming 
Freemasons by getting themselves admitted in Lodge 
St. Andrews in the East No- 343, working under the 
Scotch banner and were then visiting the lodge freely 
after their return to Bombay. This they thought was a 
very objectionable proceeding which at the same time 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 155 

that it tended to injure and endanger the reputation of 
the lodge, also thwarted the very aim and object of the 
craft which was to accord itis privileges to worthy men 
and worthy men alone. Brother Murzban brought 
forward the subject at a lodge meeting and pointed out 
that Lodge St. Andrews, which was not in a position to 
know the character and qualifications of the native 
residents of Bombay to an equal degree as the memb!era 
of Lodge Rising Star, should not be allowed to open its 
portals to them, and that a representation should be made 
to the Provincial. Grand Lodge, An animated discus- 
sion thereupon took place, in the course of which, Brother 
K. R. Cama vigorously objected to the practice and remind- 
ed the brethren of the compact that was formed between 
the lodge and the Lodge Perseverance in 1843 when the 
lodge was founded by which the lodge was not to initiate 
Europeans and Lodge Perseverance was not to admit 
natives and that Lodge Perseverance had till then faith- 
fully observed the compact fully understanding fche 
propriety thereof to mutual satisfaction and that Lodge 
St. Andrews should follow their example, and he expected 
the Brethren to uphold the reputation of the lodge and 
the excellence of the craft by making a representation 
in temperate but firm language to the Provincial Grand 
Lodge so that their hands might be strengthened in 
adopting measures necessary for checking the objection- 
able practice. The lodge unanimously passed a resolu- 
tion to that effect and immediately thereafter wrote a 
letter to the Provincial Grand Secretary making the 
complaint and asking him to place the matter before 
the Provincial Grand Master with a request that he 
should use his best endeavours to get the grievance 
remedied. (A copy of the letter will be found in Appendix 
M) At a lodge meeting held after this representation 
was submitted the Provincial Grand Master Brother 
Barton, was present, and Brother Cama mentioned the 



156 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

complaint to him and requested him to take up the matter 
in the interests of Craft Masonry and to make some 
arrangements for putting a stop to the practice. Brother 
Barton, while conceding that the lodge must have a true 
cause for complaint expressed his opinion that the Provin- 
cial Grand Lodge could not interfere in the matter, but he 
trusted that the Brethren of Lodge St, Andrews would 
not be wanting in the exercise of their good sense in the 
choice of native candidates from Bombay, and be it said 
to the credit of these Brethern that they did thereafter 
discontinue the practice of initiating natives of Bombay 
whose character and antecedents they could have no 
means of knowing, and promised not to admit natives 
who were not actual residents of Poona as the result of 
communications addressed to them. 

Brother Framji Cowasji Mehta received this year the 
Burnes Medal from the lodge with a suitable inscription 
in recognition of the services rendered by him as Steward 
for four or five years. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji presented this year a Scotch 
mace with silver mountings for the use of the Grand 
Lodge. 

The finances of the lodge were at the close of the year 
in a healthy condition and stood at the good figure of 
Rs. 3104-15-1 on the credit side. 

1867. This prosperity was maintained during the year 
1867 for after meeting all expenses and donations in 
charity there was an increase of over a thousand rupees. 
The Worshipful Master was Brother R. C. Bahadurji. 

A silver vase with a suitable inscription was presented 
this year to Brother C. N. Cama in further recognitio 
his gift of masonic jewels and clothing. 

The Provincial Grand Master Brother Barton proceed- 
ed to England for a few months for the benefit of 
his health, but before he did so Lodge Perseverance 
had started a movement for getting up a suitable 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3J>2 S.C. 157 

testimonial to him, and the lodge was asked to join 
but while fully participating in the desirability of the 
movement, it chose to act independently not from 
any motives of invidious distinction but from the 
sole desire to act prominently in doing honour to a 
Brother who had individually special claims on their 
gratitude and had always extended the right hand of 
fellowship to them. The lodge did accordingly act in a 
marked manner. It presented a special address and 
voted a gold jewel or plate as Brother Barton might 
decide costing about s 45 and the brethren also met 
Brother Barton personally at a meeting appointed to 
receive him in response to his own desire to meet 
them in open lodge assembled before leaving Bombay. 
At that meeting which was very largely attended and 
was thoroughly representative, Brother Barton paid a 
high compliment to the Lodge and said that in admitting 
many Parsi brethren into the Provincial Grand Lodge 
that lodge had profited by importing into it muc^ 
respectability, sagacity, and intelligence possessed by 
the brethren of the Rising Star. The address was 
presented by a special deputation and the plate was 
presented in England in due course in the following 
year through Brother Dadabhai Nowroji as Brother 
Barton had in the meantime left Bombay. 

The work of instruction which was done in previous 
years had not been performed for a year and a half and 
arrangements were made during the year for reviving it. 

A Masonic Library was also projected during this year 
and a committee was formed and Rupees fifty were con- 
tributed by the lodge as a donation in aid thereof. 

The draft of the Deed of Conveyance by Brother N N. 
Framji of the land to be held in trust by the lodge for 
the erection of the Framji Cowasji Masonic Hall was 
submitted and the lodge resolved that the names cf 
Brothers R. C. Dahadurji M. C. Murzban and Jehangir 



158 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Gustadji be embodied in the Deed as its representatives, 
and Brothers K- R. Cama and Murzban be nominated as 
trustees of the land. This matter was thus pushed 
forward year after year. 

Twelve regular meetings of the lodge and fourteen 
standing committee meetings were held and there 
were five initiations, seven passings and six raisings 
during the year and seven new members were 
admitted, of whom five were initiates, and two 
joining members. The initiates were Messrs. Limji 
Dinshaw Furdoonji, Cooverji Coyaji, Hirjibhai Framji 
Cooper and Doctors Burjorji Framji Lalli and Rustomji 
Nusserwanji Khory. The joining members were Bro- 
thers James McKinlay and Robert L. King, both 
holding high posts in the Provincial Grand Lodge 
and Past Masters of Lodge Perseverance. Brothfr 
McKinlay was affiliated on the proposal of Brother 
K. R. Cama who at the time of his election said 
that he regretted that the Brethren of Lodge Persever- 
ance invariably refused to affiliate the members of 
Lodge Rising Star and advised the lodge not to 
retaliate but to extend the right hand of fellowship 
to all worthy Masons. 

Brother McKinlay resigned within a few months 
owing to ill health. Brothers D. F. Karaka, Sorabji 
Pestonji Framji and A. F. Moos also resigned. The Lodge 
had this year to perform the melancholy duty of mourn- 
ing the loss of Brother Oliver, the Historian of the Craft, 
and to condole with his nearest relatives. 

For the first time since the lodge began to dispense 
sums in charity a Parsee Brother, who was a very old 
member of the lodge, being in distressed circumstances 
was assisted out of the charity funds. 

A Brother while a member of the Lodge had used before 
F.rnlhers Cursetji Framji Khory, Darasha R. Chichgar 
and Cursetji Rustomji Sethna (while they were npt 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 159 

Masons), language derogatory to masonry and those 
brethren therefore wrote to the Worshipful Master on the 
subject and thereupon the case was referred to the Stand- 
ing Committee for inquiry. Brother K. R. Cama had 
also, it appears, made some complaint against the same 
Brother and had written to the Provincial Grand Lodge 
thereon and that complaint was also referred to the 
Standing Committee and that body decided that they 
could not enter into any investigation into Brother 
Cama's complaint as a long time had elapsed since 
the happening of the event referred to by him and 
the lodge had condoned the offence but as regards the 
other complaint they resolved that it should be left solely 
to the Worshipful Master. 

The Minutes do not say what Brother Cama's complaint 
was, but it appears that in 1864, Brother Cama had com- 
plained about a Member having written a letter in 
which he had made some ambiguous and harmful reflec- 
tion upon the lodge and declined to clear himself by 
assuring the lodge that the sentiments expressed in the 
letter were not his and expressing his regret for having 
unwittingly injured the feelings of the Members in spite 
of his (Brother Cama's) best efforts to persuade him to do 
so and that the matter was referred to the Standing Com- 
mittee but at the request of Brother C. N. Cama the in- 
quiry was postponed as he was trying to bring about an 
amicable settlement. The name of the Brother was riot 
mentioned in the Minutes but it seems that he was the 
same Brother against whom the other Brethren mention^ 
ed above had complained, because that Brother though 
"passed' 1 in 1862, was not "raised" till 1865 and Brother 
Cama while vacating the Eastern Chair at the close of 
1862, had said that owing to some unpleasant circum- 
stances he was not entitled to be raised and then his 
name was mentioned. He was Brother Framji Bomanji. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



1868. Brother Murzban was the Worshipful Master 
in 1868 and his rule was marked by a thoroughness of 
purpose and a strong determination to uphold the 
integrity of the craft and the prestige of the lodge. The 
brethren were happy under his sway and the lodge 
maintained steady progress. There were five initiations, 
five passings, and seven raisings. 

The accession on the roll of members was seven, being 
five initiates, namely Cooverji Sorabji Nazir, Maneckji 
Ratanji Reporter, Jamsetji Nowroji Unwalla, Rustomji 
Merwanji Patel and Merwanji Shapurji Bahadurji, one 
affiliate, viz., Brother Darasha Dorabji Reporter from 
Lodge Concord and one Honorary Member Right Worship- 
ful Brother, Captain (after wards Sir) Henry Morland, who 
was then the Officiating Provincial Grand Master of 
Western India and Master of Lodge Perseverance. Bro- 
ther J. H. Irvine who was a member from 1861 to 1865 
and had resigned was elected an Honorary Member in 
recognition of the interest he was ever after his ceasing 
to be a Regular Member taking in the welfare of the 
lodge. 

Brother Morland was also presented with the Foun- 
der's Medal which was the gift of Brother R. C. Bahadur ji- 

Brothers R. H. Wadia and Sorabji Frommurze resigned 
and Brother Framji Bomanji, whose conduct in another 
connection was the subject of an inquiry last year on 
some further complaint of forging certain passages or 
sentences in a letter of Brother Nowroji Fur dun ji and 
dated 16th August 1861, and two letters or Certificates 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 161 

from Mr. C. A. Beytes dated 18th April 1857 and 3rd 
August 1861, and published in a book of testimonials was 
expelled from the lodge. Ever since the establishment 
of the lodge this was the first instance of an expulsion 
which was decided upon after a regular trial as of a 
criminal offender by a regular Court of Justice. 

It was first reported at a lodge meeting that Brothers 
Rustomji Nusserwanji Khory and Cursetji Framji Khory 
objected to sit with Brother Framji Bomanji and that all 
efforts to bring about an amicable settlement of the 
differences between them had proved unavailing. The 
Right Worshipful Master thereupon allowed one of the 
complaining brethren, Cursetji F. Khory, who held an 
Office, to attend the meeting and ordered that Brother 
Rustomji N. Khory who did not hold any Office and the 
offending Brother should not enter the room lest the 
harmony of the lodge should be disturbed. Later on 
certain written statements tendered by the two complain- 
ing brethren were read to the lodge but the complaining 
Brothers' letter was not read. 

Thereafter the complaining Brethren and the Brother 
charged were ordered by the Standing Committee to 
appear before them, the former with all oral and docu- 
mentary evidence in substantiation and the latter in 
disproof of the accusation. 

They accordingly appeared at a Standing Committee 
meeting. The Worshipful Master presided and opened 
the proceedings and stated the charge and asked the 
accused Brother to state whether he was guilty or not. 
He declined to answer the question contending he was 
under no obligation to do so until and unless his accusers 
made out a case against him. The Master and the 
members of the Standing Committee were of opinion 
from a masonic point of view that this attitude was 
unwarranted and unjustified and the accused Brother 
was bound to plead guilty or not and the Worshipful 

11 



162 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Master then repeated the question: " As Master I 
ask you, if you are guilty or not of these accusations'' 
and then the answer was <J No. " Thereupon further 
questions were put to him which he answered and the 
complaining brethren put in as evidence on their behalf 
the issues of th'e Rast Goftar newspaper of 14th and 
21st September and 5th, 12th and 19th October, 1862; and 
copy of a pamphlet with the title page " Testimonials and 
Review by the Editor of the Rast Goftar on the said 
Testimonials" and a book called "The Lights and 
Shades of the East'' and concluded their evidence and 
observations with a remark that they were not satisfied 
with the defence as published in the Bombay Samachar 
of 15th October, 1868. The offending Brother was then 
called upon to answer to the charges and he argued that 
the interpolations with which he had been charged had 
not been proved to have been made by him and declined 
to disclose any matter connected with his defence or to 
enter into his defence or to produce testimony, verbal or 
documentary, in his vindication. The members of the 
Committee retired for deliberation and after a few 
minutes resumed their seats, and then the Worshipful 
Master asked each of them whether he believed and 
found the offending Brother guilty or not guilty and the 
answer was " Guilty. ' The Worshipful Master then said 
he was of the same opinion, and then a resolution was 
unanimously passed as follows : 

" That looking at the whole of the evidence in the case 
and taking into consideration the kind of answers given 
by Brother Framji to the several questions put to him 
during the progress of the trial, the line of defence 
adopted by him and his broad refusal to enter into the 
particulars and the merits of the case the members of the 
Standing Committee unanimously come to the conclusion 
that Brother Framji Bomanji is guilty of having forged 
or caused to be forged certain passages or sentences, viz., 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 16a 

those specified in Brother Rustomji Nusserwanji's 
letter of the 16th August 1861 from Brother Nowroji 
Furdunji and the two letters of certificates from 
Mr. C. A. Beytes, dated 16th April 1857 and 3rd 
August 1861, respectively, with a view to promote his 
worldly interests by means thereof." An emergent 
meeting of the lodge was then called to receive 
the Report of the Standing Committee and to come to a 
final adjudication in the matter. The Worshipful Master 
explained to the members all the circumstances con" 
nected with the case and the reasons and grounds for 
the resolution of the Standing Committee in an elaborate 
speech. The offending Brother, who was present, said 
it was impossible for any Brother to fathom his 
motives and to know why he refused to make a 
defence. He was asked then to make his defence 
which he did not do, but at the same time he said 
that certain things had happened which had offended 
him, and he believed that the Worshipful Master was 
prejudiced against him, as appeared from his having 
ordered him out of the lodge which was tantamount to 
prejudging his case, and that he was not going to have 
an impartial inquiry and that the matter had happened 
six years ago, and he ha'd reasons of his own for not 
making a defence. He was again asked to state his 
defence there and then which he again refused to do, and 
added that he would make his defence before the Grand 
Lodge. The report of the Standing Committee was then 
confirmed by fifteen votes against one, the complaining 
Brother not being allowed to vote at all. Then the Wor- 
shipful Master made some observations on the general 
character and consequences of the several sorts and 
degrees of punishment in the power of the lodge to award, 
and having regard to the lapse of time that had occurred 
in the matter recommended a merciful treatment. The 
offending Brother was then asked if he had anything to 



164 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

say why punishment should not be awarded to him for 
commission of the offence brought home to him but he 
made no reply. Then by a majority of votes a resolution 
was passed excluding the Brother from a participation of 
all rights and privileges appertaining to the members of 
the lodge. 

The offending Brother had, after the report of the 
Standing Committee, sent in his resignation, but it was 
not accepted. He was in arrears of lodge dues and it 
was resolved that he should be finally called upon to 
pay them and given notice that in default his name 
would be struck off the rolls. 

After the lodge passed the resolution of expulsion the 
said Brother wrote a letter of protest which was couched 
in very discourteous language. It was brought up at a 
subsequent meeting, and the lodge resolved that he should 
be called upon to withdraw it and to tender an apology 
for having sent it, and that in the event of non-compliance 
with the requisition the letter should be forwarded to the 
Provincial Grand Master for disposal. The expulsion 
was in due course confirmed by the Provincial Grand 
Master. 

Right Worshipful Brother Ballingall died during the 
year and the lodge recorded its regret in suitable 
terms. 

During the year presents were made to the lodge of 
the photo of a lodge room by Brother Jamsetji Dhanji- 
bhoy Wadia, an elegantly bound copy of the Khordeh- 
Avesta by Brother R- C. Bahadur ji, a handsome cushion 
for placing thereon the sacred volume by the Worshipful 
Master's wife, and a sum of rupees fifty by a Brother 
named E. Meidenger who had left Bombay, contributed to 
the Charity Funds through Brother Aaron " as a slight 
token of the esteem and respect in which he held the 
lodge for its admirable working, for the hospitality 
and brotherly feelings always shown to visitors at its 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 165 

meetings, and for the truly masonic spirit in which the 
lodge was worked." 

The plate voted to Brother Barton last year was 
presented this year in Yarborough Lodge at Brighton by 
Brother Dadabhoy Nowroji on behalf of the lodge, and an 
account of the proceedings of that lodge in the Brighton 
Gazette of 24th September 1868 was read at the lodge 
meeting held on 20th October, and that lodge was in due 
course thanked for allowing the jewel to be presented at 
their meeting. 

At the same time that this presentation wag made the 
testimonial got up by the other lodges was also presented. 
The following account is taken from the Indian Free- 
mason and Monthly Miscellany, Volume XI, pp. 32*3. 

"An interesting ceremony took place at the annual 
installation meeting of 'The Yarborough Lodge ' No. 811, 
Brighton, in the presence of Rev. John Griffith (Principal 
of Brighton College) Master of the Lodge, Lord Pelham. 
M. P., and E. J. Turner, Esquire (Grand Master and 
Depute Grand Master of the Province of Sussex) and a 
large number of visiting brethren. This was a presenta- 
tion to Brother R. B. Barton, Provincial Grand Master of 
Western India, of a magnificent ornament consisting of an 
Epergne for flowers on the centre pedestal and four 
branches for candles on each side of the same supported 
on a neat but elegant base carrying on the side the crest, 
ribband and motto of the recipient, and on the reverse the 
following inscription : 

" Presented to Richard Bolton Barton, Esquire, LL. D., 
Barrister-at-Law, Provincial Grand Master for Western 
India, and late Acting Chief Magistrate of Bombay, as a 
mark of esteem, affection and regard by the members of 
Rising Star No. 342 of Bombay instituted for admitting 
the natives of India into the masonic brotherhood, Sep- 
tember 1867,'' with a beautifully modelled figure in dead 
silver representing a Parsee Mason with elbow leaning 



166 HISfORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

on a masonic pillar, the hand pointing to a Provincial 
Grand Master's jewel lying at the foot of the pillar forming 
the centre and principal object of the piece of plate. The 
testimonial also included a handsome 22-inch oval silver 
waiter chased with a laurel leaf border, the centre being 
engraved with a crest, ribband and motto of the recipient 
and the following inscription: " Presented to Richard 
Bolton Barton, Esquire, LL. D., Provincial Grand Master 
of Western India, late Acting Chief Magistrate of Bombay, 
by the undermentioned lodges : Provincial Grand Lodge 
of India, St. Andrews in the East, Poona ; Perseverance, 
Bombay ; Hope, Kurrachee; St.Paul, Mhow ; in testimony 
of their high appreciation of the services rendered by 
him to the lodges of Western India 1868 " surrounded 
by an elegantly engraved border of oak leaves and 
laurel. 

Brother Dadabhoy Nowroji, who attended as a deputa- 
tion for the Bombay lodges, expressed thanks on their 
behalf for allowing the opportunity to be made in the 
Yarborough Lodge of notifying their testimony to the 
esteem and regard in which Brother Barton was held in 
the province over which he so ably presided. He continu- 
ed "Lodge Rising Star, Worshipful Master, is the first 
lodge founded for admitting the natives of India to the 
privileges of Freemasonry. At the time of its institution 
in 1843 there were supposed to be many difficulties in the 
way: difficulties of race , difficulties of social custom, of 
political equality, differences of enlightenment and 
perhaps many others. But there were stout hearts 
who headed by James Burnes, maintained and desired 
to prove that Masonry belonged to no creed or colour, 
to no climate or race. It was the universal patrimony of 
mankind. It was the " one touch of nature which makes 
the whole world kin " and Lodge Rising Star thus came 
into existence. The foundation of that lodge has broken 
the spell of ages. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 167 

The young Parsees, yet mere striplings in Masonry, are 
already showing the arrogance of contesting that if 
Masonry was not their own they were at least fellow- 
masons from the earliest periods. 

The Parsees and Mahomedans especially of the Persian 
race take to Masonry as young ducks take to water. The 
moment they enter the holy precincts they find them- 
selves in their own element. The gratitude they feel for 
the boon in I will not simply say bestowing upon them 
but restoring to them the benefits of Masonry, was so 
keenly felt that at the very first anniversary of the Lodge 
Rising Star it founded a medal in honour of its first 
Master and Founder Dr. Burnes, one of which you now 
see decorating Brother Barton's breast. Another in- 
stance of their gratitude is the ceremony of to-night. 
Brother Barton has as a citizen filled the important func- 
tions of Chief Magistrate, Queen's Coroner and Head of 
the Insolvent Court of Bombay and I have a doubt if any 
person whether Englishman or native will deny that he 
held the scales justly between all. Valuable and justly 
honoured as these services are, the masonic virtues of 
Brother Barton claim still higher admiration, the virtues 
that he has not merely acquired after being a Mason but 
those actually brought with him when he became a Mason. 
His genial kindness and sincere honest good will towards 
the natives of India has endeared him to all. A universe 
cannot be discovered twice. A truth cannot be discover- 
ed twice. A first lodge cannot be founded twice. If 
Brother Barton had not the opportunity of founding the 
first lodge for the admission of natives, he was still for- 
tunate enough of having the opportunity of doing some- 
thing that was first of its kind. It was he who systema- 
tically and freely admitted the natives into the Grand 
Lodge of India. Before that time there was only one 
native Brother Maneckji Cursetji who held Grand Lodge 
Office. If Brother Barton has not founded Lodge Rising 



168 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Star, he has nursed it, strengthened it and encouraged it 
in its forward course. The members desirous of show- 
ing their esteem, specially wished that a native should 
present this testimonial. It is my sincere wish in which 
all my native brethren heartily join that you may live 
long tD enjoy the consciousness that you have done your 
duty as a man and Mason. " 

The Worshipful Master then presented the Salver on 
behalf of the other lodges with some appropriate remarks. 
Brother Barton in responding thanked the brethren for 
having elected him a member of the Yarborough Lodge 
and permitting their hospitable board to be made the 
medium through which he said " these testimonials are 
presented tome by dearly loved friends thousands of miles 
away. The Masons of Western India would feel grateful 
and although this presentation comes from lodges holding 
under the Grand Lodge of Scotland it is evident that no 
matter the colour of the banner the hearts of Masons are 
all of the one true mould and brotherly love abides therein. 

The reception of my esteemed Brother and friend 
Dadabhoy Nowroji here to-night and the admirable man- 
ner in which he addressed you will make not a few think 
that after all great as England is there are other 
countries beyond its own pale cliffs and people who only 
require kindness, consideration and justice to place them 
on a level with the most favoured nations of the earth. 
I have already conveyed my thanks to all the lodges under 
my jurisdiction in Western India, but this I must say by 
one and all of them I have been treated for years with a 
kindness, courtesy and forbearance that no words of 
mine can express. v 

The funds at the end of this year amounted to Rupees 
5,298-15-5, of which. Rupees 3,291-4-0 stood to the credit 
of the Charity Account. 

At the meeting held for the election of the Master for 
the ensuing 12 months, a Brother with the Worshipful 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 31*2 S.C. 169 

Master's permission delivered an elaborate discourse on 
the qualifications required in a ruler of the lodge and 
proposed in very eulogistic and expressive language that 
Brother Marzban should be re-elected Master by accla- 
mation as he said the "Star" never shone more resplen- 
dent than during his rule. The Worshipful Master 
objected to the proposal on principle saying that some 
members would not have courage enough to speak in 
opposition to it while by allowing it they would be doing 
injustice to other worthy members eligible for the chair 
and requested the brethren to proceed with the election 
in the usual manner and thereupon Brother Murzban was 
re-elected by a majority of votes. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

1869. This choice for the second time was fully justi- 
fied for Brother Murzban added fresh laurels to his 
achievements of the past year by his perseverance in 
masonic duties, his earnestness of purpose in all he did, 
his enforcement of discipline and his zealous endeavours 
in all other matters respecting the advancement of the 
welfare of the lodge- He drew forth unstinted praise 
and admiration for his work and when he was about to 
lay down the hiram after a second year's arduous labour 
some brethren suggested his election as Worshipful 
Master for the third time but he stepped in and as the 
records show prevented this endeavour bearing fruit on 
the ground that other members were entitled to occupy 
the chair, The lodge however on his retirement from 
office resolved that a full-sized portrait of his be placed 
in the lodge rooms, the cost to be defrayed by subscrip- 
tions amongst the members, and voted to him the 
Founder's medal in addition to a Past Master's jewel. 

In numbers the lodge did not gain but in the quality of 
members it did this year. Two brethren namely Brothers 
(now Sir) Pherozsha M. Mehta, hailing from Lodge 
Marquis of Dalhousie, London, and Jamsetji Jahangir 
Panthkey of Lodge Eastern Star, Bombay, were affiliated, 
the former of whom now adorns our list of Honorary 
Members in which he was placed in the year 1893. Mr, 
Ardesir Jehangir Wadia was the only person initiated. 

There were two resignations, viz., of Brothers Pestonji 
Qajibhoy Unwalla and Merwanji Bcmanj, so that the net 
increase was only one. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 171 

The lodge was very strict and rigid in its scrutiny into 
the qualifications of proposed members and had not at all 
relaxed its cautious policy in that behalf. It disapproved of 
four candidates but at the same time it was not unwilling 
to extend its fellowship to worthy men and did not want 
to limit the number of members, but was anxious to 
further its noble work of usefulness. The number of sub- 
scribing members was by this time already about 50 and 
a proposition was brought forward by a Brother that the 
number should be limited to that figure. He found a 
solitary seconder but the proposition was vetoed by all 
the other brethren after much discussion. 

The finances of the lodgei however, were in a more 
flourishing condition on the whole, and in the scales the 
charity outweighed the general funds. There having been 
only one initiation there could not be an appreciable in- 
crease to the general funds ; besides that a pretty large 
sum was expended on Past Masters' jewels which had 
been voted to the five previous Past Masters but had not 
been presented and were ordered out from Scotland this 
year and these and the ordinary and other expenses of 
the lodge reduced the general fund a little, but still it 
stood at Rs. 1,311-13-7. The charity funds stood at Rs. 4,338 
in spite of the amounts expended thereout for relief 
of distressed and suffering Masons. Up to now it ap- 
pears that the lodge was systematically helping Masons 
or widows and children of Masons left in destitut3 cir- 
cumstances, and its succour was not extended to non-Ma- 
sons. The charity funds having increased and some mem- 
bers being at their wits' ends how to employ them, pro- 
positions were brought forward for laying out sums in 
helping people in sore need of all communities without 
distinction of race, caste, creed or colour in such manner 
as the Past Masters of the lodge or the Standing 
Committee might recommend, but after discussion they 
were withdrawn as the lodge considered that there 



172 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

was nothing to prevent their .helping non-Masons if they 
chose to do so. For the first time a sum of Rupees two 
hundred was lent out of the charity funds to an 
European Brother to enable him to start in business and 
also a monthly stipend of Rs. 25 was voted during such 
time as the Standing Committee might think fit to 
continue it for the support and education of the son of a 
Parsi Brother who had died some years ago. 

The presentation of Past Masters' jewels; to Brothers 
Merwanji Manekji Sethna, Nowroji N. Framji, D. R. 
Cola, C. J. Tarachand and R. C. Bahadurji was made at a 
meeting which was very largely attended by the members 
and a large number of visiting brethren who had been 
invited to give eclat to the proceedings followed by 
a banquet, the expense of which was to a great extent 
defrayed from subscriptions raised from amongst the 
members pursuant to a resolution of the lodge passed 
with the object of encroaching as little as possible upon 
the lodge funds. Brother M. M. Sethna presented on 
that occasion a Government 4 per cent. Promissory Loan 
Note for Rs. 500 upon condition that it should remain as 
a permanent endowment, the income thereof to be applied 
towards the charity funds of the lodge, and thus laid the 
foundation of endowment funds. 

The Amateurs of the Parsi Elphinstone Dramatic Club, 
by the special desire of their Secretary, Bro. Cooverji S. 
Nazir, who then was a young budding Mason, gave a 
performance of Shakespeare's " Merchant of Venice" (in 
English) and the Farce of, " Our New Man " under the 
patronage of the Right Worsihipful Master, officers and 
brethren of the lodge on 13th February 1869 at the 
Grant Road Theatre and the net proceeds of the 
performance, amounting to Rupees four hundred and 
fifty-seven, were handed by the club to be placed to the 
credit of the charity funds of the lodge, for which the 
club and the Secretary were duly thanked by special 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 173 

resolutions. On this occasion a dispensation was obtained 
by the Right Worshipful Master from the Provincial 
Grand Master for all brethren under the Scottish 
banner to appear at the performance in masonic costume. 
There was another occasion on which the Parsi brethren 
of the lodge were requested by the Right Worshipful 
Master to bedeck themselves in masonic costume in 
public and that was the Jamsetji Nowroze (the Vernal 
Equinox) kept by Zoroastrians universally as a festive 
day. Many brethren desired that the Parsi brethren 
should march in procession (laid down by the Constitu- 
tions) from the lodge to some convenient Fire-temple 
or Agiary in masonic costume. The Standing Committee 
warmly supported the recommendation which was then 
brought before the lodge and that body by a majority 
passed a resolution accepting it. 

Two instructive lectures, one called " A Masonic 
Lecture " and the other "Lecture on Landmarks of Free- 
masonry " were delivered by the Worshipful Master 
and were highly applauded and some instruction meetings 
were also, it seems, held during this year. 

Brother C. N. Cama had already been voted the 
Founder's medal and honoured with the title of Hono- 
rary Depute Master, but it was considered that that 
honorary appellation could not be continued permanently, 
and as the lodge had in 1867 resolved to do something 
suitable in return for the munificent gifts he had made 
of masonic jewels and clothing and notihing had been 
done till then a resolution was passed that the mere 
usual Burners medal being inadequate a Burne's gold 
medal of the same size as the silver one should be struck 
with a suitable inscription and presented to him. 

Presents of an elegant substantial black--wood box 
from Brother Jamsetji Dhanjibhai Wadia and of a book 
called "Masonic Harmonia " from Brother H. H. Aaron 
were thankfully received and the book was lent to the 



174 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Organist of the lodge to further his progress in masonic 
music. 

Brother Pestonji Hormusji Cama also presented to 
the lodge threa large tracing boards handsomely illumi- 
nated and had a frame set at his expense to Right 
Worshipful Brother Maneckji Cursetji's oil paint like- 
ness. 

The Provincial Grand Master had now returned to 
Bombay and paid a visit to the lodge at one of its regular 
meetings and expressed that he was eminently satisfied 
at the way in which the lodge was worked and that he 
had seen many lodges in England, Ireland and other 
places, but that he had never witnessed greater caution, 
strictness and truly masonic spirit anywhere elese than 
in the lodge, and at another meeting he informed the 
brethren that Brother Dadabhai Nowroji had astounded 
the European brethren of Lodge Yarborough by his neat 
and elegant speech and ths complete satisfaction he gave 
him while presenting the plate on behalf of the ledge. 
In advance of his visit Brother Barton had sent to the 
lodge a photo of his taken with the plate presented to 
him by the lodge with a letter and the photo was ordered 
to be framed and hung in the lodge room. 

Brother Dadabhai Nowroji was at this time in India for 
a few months again and at the very first meeting of the 
year which he attended he was formally introduced and 
then received with masonic honours for distinguishing 
himsslf as a benefactor of th-a people of India in a far 
distant country and for his valuable exertions in all .that 
was truly great. Brother Dadabhai had then already made? 
England his home, and was mare there than in India and 
had also his firm of Messrs. Dadabhai Nowroji & Co., 
carrying on business there. He had devoted himself to 
the service of his countrymen and had by reason of his 
public life few opportunities for dislinguishing himself 
in Masonry. Yet the Star, his mother lodge, had a place 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 175 

in his heart and its affairs always claimed a part of his 
attention which he was not slow to give. At the end of 
the year he again left for England and with all the good 
wishes of the lodge. 

Brother Barton also again left for England at the end 
of the year and the lodge recorded a resolution in suitable 
terms regretting his departure and the consequent loss to 
the fraternity in Bombay. He was succeeded by Right 
Worshipful Brother Captain Henry Morland who had 
already, as the minutes show, conceived an exceedingly 
favourable opinion about the lodge \vhich he had openly 
said was one of the most loyal lodges to the Grand Lodge 
of Scotland and was worked with credit and efficiency. 
Brother Morland 's nomination to the exalted office of 
Provincial Grand Master of Western Star was supported 
by the lodge. 

The lodge did not consider its duty as being confined 
only to encourage the noble principles of the Craft within 
its sacred walls alone and to give every Brother his due 
for what he did in the lodge but in a truly masonic spirit 
and according to the ancient charges it applauded within 
its precincts the good works and deeds and acts of bene- 
volence and charity, as understood in their most extended 
sense, of its members as citizens of the world, and in this 
year for the first time the services rendered by Brother 
R. C. Bahadurji in his profession and the noble devotion 
shown by him to some of his patients were recorded in 
very flattering terms in the minutes of a lodge meetings, 
the object being to hold up his example for imitation by 
the brethren in their different walks of life apart from 
their duties within the inner, yet, very large circle of 
Freemasonry. 

The members were again getting a little irregular in 
their attendance and had to be warned that the rule re- 
garding the sending in of excuses would be strictly en- 
forced, 



1?6 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The draft trust deed of the land for the Framji Cowas- 
ji Masonic Hall was re-submitted by Brother N. N, 
Framji and was finally approved by the lodge and it is 
stated that Brother Jehangir Merwanji Pleader had 
helped in the matter with his legal advice. The repre- 
sentatives on behalf of the lodge were dropped and 
Brothers K. R. Cama and Murzban were nominated 
Trustees as resolved in 1867. The project of the Masonic 
Hall was thus making progress but was no way near 
completion. The lodge found the rooms where it assem- 
bled unsuitable and had to write to Lodge Perseverance 
and also to the Provincial Grand Lodge more than once 
complaining of insufficient accommodation and want of 
punkhas and masonic pavement and lights in the East, 
South and West, but the grievance was not remedied. 



CHAPTER XIX. 

1870. Brother Jehangir Gustadji was elected Master 
for the year 187(3 and Right Worshipful Brother K. R. 
Cama, who was at this time Substitute Provincial Grand 
Master of Western Star, duly installed him by desire of 
the Provincial Grand Master, who was also present at the 
meeting. 

The system introduced last year of using spare time 
when no work was done in giving lectures was continued. 
Brothers Murziban and J. J. Lam delivered masonic lec- 
tures while the Worshipful Master enlightened the bre- 
thren by reading passages on Masonry from Dr. Oliver's 
works. 

The degree work done was 7 initiations and 6 passings. 
Nine new members were enrolled while 7 resigned, and of 
the nine, seven were initiates, one affiliate and one joining 
member. The initiates were Bomanji Oursetji Ashburner, 
Burjorji Pallonji Dolimeherji and his brother Sorabji, 
Hormusji Ardeshir Suntoke, Jehangir RustomjiMody and 
Burjorji Dorabji Patel and his brother Nusserwanji, and 
the affiliate and joining members were Brothers Pestonji 
DinshaAdenwalla from Lodge Felix No. 355 S.O.of Aden 
and Rustomji Hormusji Mistrina of Lodge Eastern Star. 
Brother Adenwala had already been proposed for initia- 
tion and elected a member on 20th January 1869 but he 
sub sequently seems to have 1 eft for Aden and entered Lodge 
Felix and now became therefore an affiliated member. 
The resigning members were Brothers J. F. Un walla, DD. 
Ghandhi, Jehangir Merwanji Pleader, Dossabhoy B. Pesi- 
kaka, N.M. Lungrana, F.C. Mehta and H.N. Saklatwalla, 

12 



178 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The medal voted in 1868 to Worshipful Brother F. C. 
Mehta was presented to him this year. The gold medal 
voted to Brother C. N. Cama had not yet been presented 
to him for there was none to spare and the medal die 
was missing and the lodge thereupon resolved that if the 
die could not be found a testimonial in form to be approv- 
ed by him should be presented tio that worthy Brother of 
the value of Rs. 250, and accordingly later in the year 
a gold jewel consisting of a key beautifully engraved 
and elegant-looking and having a suitable inscription, 
a Master Mason's highly finished and elegant apron and 
a sash in accordance with the Scotch Constitution and 
interlaced in front with silver thread were ordered out 
for him from Scotland. 

Brother J. D. Wadia presented to the lodge this year 
a cigar box for the use of the European brethren and 
Brother Hormusji Pestonji Framji had the aprons and 
jewels repaired and put in order at his own expense. 

The question of the Past Master's jewel which had been 
voted to Brother A. J. Bhajeewalla on his retirement 
from the Eastern Chair but had been with-held was again 
brought up this year and it was resolved after some dis- 
cussion that it should be sent to him with a letter from 
the Standing Committee, but this too was not done and 
the subject came up again in 1872. 

There was a judicious distribution of the charity 
funds this year as in the past and destitute orphans left] 
by Masons and non-Masons in a far distant country like 
Singapore and the poor Zoroastrians of Persia were 
amongst the objects of the bounty of the lodge. Not only 
this, but the sympathy of the lodge was extended in the 
common idea of an universal and benevolent institution 
to the succour and relief of the widows and orphans of 
the soldiers who had perished in the dreadful European 
war which was then raging on the Continent and Rupees 
three hundred were voted out of the charity funds, one- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 179 

half to be remitted to the Grand Orient of France and 
the other half to the Grand Lodge of Prussia, and this 
amount was duly remitted through the Treasurer of 
the Provincial Grand Lodge together with a further sum 
of Rupees one hundred and forty-eight subscribed by 
individual members. 

There were 12 regular meetings of the lodge and nine 
meetings of the Standing Committee during the year. At 
the last or anniversary meeting two interesting functions 
took place. Brother Murzban was presented with a Past 
Master's jewel, Founder's medal and a silver cup, which 
were all voted to him last year, and a full-sized portrait 
of his was placed in the Masonic Hall. Right Worshipful 
Brother Captain Morland, the Provincial Grand Master, 
was, by permission of the Worshipful Master, presemted 
in open lodge by a special deputation of the members of 
Lodge Felix No. 355 S. C- of Aden with a vellum roll on 
which was engrossed an extract from the minute book of 
that lodge unanimously electing him (its own child) its 
honorary member. 

This year the lodge passed a resolution on a motion 
brought forward by Brother D. R. Chichgar on grounds 
of expediency, convenience and economy (1) that the 
rooms in Colaba which it had rented under Lodge Perse- 
verance and in which it had been assembling for many 
years now having been found very unsuitable and 
deficient in accommodation and other ways should be 
given up and the lodge should meet in the Masonic Hall 
at Mazagon which the Freemasons* Hall Committee had 
offered to allow it to use on payment of a fair rent and 
was a suitable place for masonic meetings, and (2) that 
the lodge meetings should be held on the first Saturday 
of every month except that when that day should be a 
holiday or an emergency should arise it should meet on 
the preceding or such other available day as the Wor- 
shipful Master may think proper. The By-law prescrib 



180 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ing the day for holding meetings was accordingly altered 
and subsequently approved by the Grand Lodge and from 
this time forward the regular meetings have been held on 
the first Saturday of every month. 

Lodge Perserverance also was trying to secure a suita- 
ble and central hall for all lodges under the Scottish 
banner to meet, and the lodge was asked by that body to 
nominate its representative on their Committee appointed 
for considering the subject, and being still of opinion 
that if all the Scotch lodges were to meet in one common 
hall Lodge Rising Star would not keep aloof provided all 
terms were suitable. The lodge nominated Brothers Murz- 
ban, M. M. Sethna, J. J. Lam, H. P. Framji and Darasha 
Chichgar as its representatives on Lodge Perseverance 
Committee. The Mazagon Hall was, however, used for 
a very short time. Brother Darasha Chichgar had 
shown a great interest in the internal economy of the 
lodge and had proved a very earnest and zealous Secr- 
etary during this and the preceding years and he was 
duly rewarded by a Founder's r^edal being voted to him 
in return. 

The transaction relating to the land for the Framji 
Cowasji Masonic Hall was completed this year. The 
necessary Trust Deed was executed by Brother N. N. 
Framji and the Trustees of his estate and together with 
the munimentis of title was handed over to the lodge. 
The Trustees, as already stated, were Brothers K. R. 
Cama and M. C. Murzban. (A copy of the Trust Deed is 
set otat in Appendix N.) 

1871. The year 1871 was more or less a quiet year 
but the lodge unfortuuately lost very much in numerical 
strength, for four of its most sympathetic, efficient, useful 
and energetic Past Masters, viz., Brothers M. M. Sethna, 
N. N. Framji, C. J. Tarachand and D. R. Cola resigned. 
Brother L. R. King, who was almost always present at 
all the lodge meetings and took an interest in all affairs 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 181 

appertaining to the lodge, also resigned, having had to 
proceed to England, and upon his resignation being 
accepted it was proposed he should be made an honorary 
member, but that Brother on coming to know of it 
wrote declining the honour with thanks as he wished at 
some future time t;O be a voting member again. Further, 
Brothers N. M. Wadia, F. D. Bahadur ji, Hormusji 
Pestonji Cama, Sorabji Jijibhai, Merwanji Shapurji 
Bahadurji, Dadabhoy Nowroji and Nowroji Furdoonji 
also resigned, and of these, Brother Dadabhai Nowroji 
was elected an honorary member. 

The Right Worshipful Master resigned his office dur- 
ing the middle of the year in the interest of the lodge 
as owing to certain anxieties which followed upon the 
adverse decision of a civil suit in the High court against 
him he was unable, he said, to discharge his duties effici- 
ently. He also resigned his membership ati the same 
time and Brother Jehangir Gustadji was elected to fil 
the office of Worshipful Master for the rest of the year. 

Against the thirteen resignations there were two 
additions, namely of Mr. Rustomji Muncherji Chichgar 
and Dr. Dossabhai Pestonji, of whom the former has 
since continued without a break to be a subscribing 
member and has, as will be seen later on, rendered 
good and substantial service to the lodge. 

The lodge now again removed from the beginning of 
this year from the Mazagon Hall to a building at 
Gowalia Tank Road in' consequence of new arrangements 
made by the Provincial Grand Master. 

A testimonial was got up this year to the Past Grand 
Master Mason of! Scotland, the Eight Honourable the 
Earl of Dalhousie,, and the ledge contributed its mite 
thereto. 

The gold jewel and apron voted to Brother C. N. Cama 
and Founder's medal voted to Brother D- R. Chichgar 
were presented to them during this year. 



182 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The committee of representatives of the Scottish 
masonic bodies had submitted during the year three re- 
ports anent the proposed Masonic Hall and the lodge 
adopted them and invested Rupees five hundred in fifty 
shares of the Masonic Hall under the scheme put forward 
by the Committee and appointed the Worshipful Master 
and Brother D. R. Chichgar its representatives on that 
Committee. Brother Murzban was the Honorary Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Committee at this date. 

Amongst the recipients of charitable donations this 
year was a French Arab of the name of Jose Ben Teddo, 
who was helped upon the recommendation of Brother 
L. A. Lessingnot, then Vice-Consul for France, to enable 
him to proceed to Gibraltar. 



CHAPTER XX. 

1872. Brother Darasha R. Chichgar was the Worship, 
ful Master during the year 1872. He was installed into 
the Eastern Chair by Brother K. R. Cama> who was still 
the Substitute Provincial Grand Master and had to per- 
form the ceremony in that capacity for the second time, 
He continued the pratice of giving lectures for the instruc- 
tion and improvement of the brethren. He himself read 
two papers on the objects of Freemasonry, in one of which 
he illustrated the very striking resemblance between a 
bee-hive and a masonic lodge. He also read at one meet- 
ing a short and vivid account of the masonic life and 
achievements of Dr. Burnes, the father and founder of the 
lodge, and at its conclusion Right Worshipful Brother J. 
Anderson, an honorary member and one of the Past 
Masters of the lodge and as a very old Mason of the time 
of Dr. Burnes also recounted that noble Brother's career 
and particularly the zeal with which he had founded the 
Star, and stated to the brethren that a very high opinion 
about the efficiency and respectability of the lodge was 
entertained by the members of one of the masonic lodges 
he had happened to visit during his recent visit to 
England. 

The Worshipful Master's example was followed by 
Brother Murzban, whose interest in diffusing masonic 
knowledge still unabatingly continued. At his suggestion 
the lodge resolved to place the library of books in the 
lodge-room for the use of the brethren and appointed 
Brother Hirjibhoy F. Cooper to be the librarian to issue 
books on days appointed for the regular meetings. 



184 OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S. 

The general funds of the lodge were now again at an 
ebb and showed a debit balance of Rs. 400. Measures 
were adopted for tiding over the difficulty by curtailing 
the expenditure and increasing the income by imposing a 
dinner fee per head until such time as the finances 
improved and borrowing from the charity funds to 
meet immediate necessities. The charity funds still 
stood at a good figure in spite of donations and monthly 
stipends paid out of it amounting to about Rs. 1,100, 
and were now formally transferred to the names of 
Brothers Murzban, D. R. Chichgar, R. C. Bahadurji 
and C. N. Cama with power [to any two of them to 
endorse them. 

The lodge had to perform the melancholy duty of 
condoling with the Provincial Grand Master on the loss 
sustained by him in the loss of his wife, and a resolution 
was passed in that behalf at an emergent meeting, a copy 
of which was handed to him personally by a deputation 
consisting of the members of the Standing Committee. 
The lodge also joined this year all the sister lodges 
working under the Scottish Jurisdiction in response to a 
suggestion from the Provincial Grand Master in a suitable 
address of condolence to Lady Mayo in her then recent 
bereavement caused by the assassination of Lord Mayo 
at the hands of a convict in the Andaman Islands, and 
contributed its mite towards the cost therof . 

The Past Master's clothing and jewel which had 
been voted to Brother K. R. Cama when he retired from 
the Master's chair were presented to him this year with 
full masonic honours, and while suitably acknowledging 
this mark of esteem and fraternal regard he again 
assured the Brethren of his desire and readiness at all 
times to assist the lodge to the best of his power and 
ability. 

Brother J. Gustadji was also presented at the same 
time with a Past Master's jewel. 



HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 185 

The Past. Master's jewel voted to Brother A. J. Bhajee- 
walla had not been sent by the Standing Committee to 
him with a letter as decided in the year 1870. The Right 
Workshipful Master with the sanction of that body 
presented the jewel this year to Brother Ardesir at one 
of the lodge meetings, as the circumstances under which 
the previous resolution on the subject had been passed 
had, it was explained, ceased to exist. 

The Provincial Grand Master had formulated a scheme 
for the dispensation of charity by all the lodges in the 
Presidency and the formation of a General Benevolent 
Fund for that purpose and it was personally put for- 
ward by him before the members at a lodge meeting at 
the end of the year. It included the building of a 
Masonic Hall as one of its objects. It was discussed in 
the Standing Committee, to which it was referred, and 
was approved in its general features. It then came 
before the lodge but was opposed by Brother P. M. Mehta 
and others who doubted its efficiency and thought that 
the bestowal of charity under it could not be carried on 
as advantageously as by the individual lodges themselves 
and that at any rate the building of a Masonic Hall 
should not have been included in it. Brothers K. R. 
Cama and M. C. Murzban and others were in favour 
of the scheme but by a majority of votes it was not 
adopted. Within a few days thereafter an emergent 
meeting was called at the request of several brethren 
for reconsidering the matter, and upon the proposition 
of Brother P. M. Mehta, duly seconded, the lodge passed 
a resolution thereat unanimously approving the scheme 
but with a recommendation that it would be advisable 
to keep the subject of a Masonic Hall apart from it, 
and Brother K. R. Cama expressed his entire satis- 
faction at the result. 

Brother P.M. Mehta was this year nominated the repre- 
sentative of the lodge on the Masonic Hall Committee. 

14 



186 OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 

Only two new members, namely:, Manekji Hormusji 
Masani, an initiate, and Brother Sherifali Salemahomed 
an affiliate from Lodge Harmony of Kurrachee, joined, 
while four members, viz. Brothers D. H. Cama, Cooverji 
Coyaji, Cumrudin Tyebji and Hormusji Pestonji Framji 
resigned the lodge. 

For tha first time it was in this year that a Hindu 
Brother named Harichand Chintaman sought admission 
in the lodge as a visitor. As on the ground of their being 
polytheists and not monotheists the Hindus were not 
taken in the Order, a discussion arose but ultimately the 
Worshipful Master admitted the Brother as he belonged 
to a regularly constituted lodge of Masons in England and 
also held a certificate from the Grand Lodge. 

It had come to the knowledge of the Worshipful Master 
that some Hindu gentlemen were about to be initiated 
in Lodge Cyrus- He therefore without losing time wrote a 
letter in his official capacity after consulting many of the 
oldest members of the lodge to Worshipful Brother J. N. 
Dady, the Master of that lodge, informing him that the 
question of admitting Hindus into the craft had engaged 
the serious attention of several individual lodges but 
had not been definitely settled and that the concensus 
of opinion was that it should be solved by all the 
lodges collectively and suggesting that before he took 
any steps in the matter, it would be better for him 
to hold a conference with all the sister lodge, both 
English and Scotch and discuss the subject as it affected 
the interest of every Freemason throughout the globe, 
and requested him to read the letter to his lodge 
before proceeding to ballot for the candidates. (See 
Appendix O.) 

The minutes do not contain any further allusion to 
this matter, but! the following extract from Worshipful 
Brother H. W. Barrow's contribution' printed in the Cama 
Masonic Jubilee Volume shows what was done by the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 31*2 S.C. 187 

fraternity and the Provincial Grand Lodge in the 
matter : 

" In or about 1872 some little advance was made by the 
admission of four other Hindu gentlemen in lodge by us 
but as no regular rules regarding such admissions had 
been laid down, the whole question was referred by the 
Provincial Grand Lodge of Western India to a Committee 
consisting of Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama and 
Right Worshipful Brother Muncherji Cowasji Murzban 
(now C. I. E.) and the result of their report w r as that 
subject to certain modifications the recommendations 
contained therein for regular and clearly defined provi- 
sions regarding the declaration and obligation were 
formally sanctioned. These were in effect precisely the 
same fundamental principles as those which were adopt- 
ed by the authorities of the District Grand Lodge and in 
both cases were duly authorized by the supreme autho- 
rities in Scotland and in England." 

1873. Brother P.M. Mehta was the Worshipful Master 
in 1873, and he worked the lodge with the same zeal, 
energy and independence as his worthy -predecessors had 
evinced in all matters affecting the lodge or advancing 
its interests and usefulness. 

Thirteen lodge meetings and nine Standing Committee 
meetings were held and four initiations, four passings, 
and five raisings were the degree work done during 
the year and the Right Worshipful Master had also 
delivered a lecture on a masonic subject taking a portion 
of the tracing board in the first degree for his text, 
which was considered very interesting and was highly 
applauded. 

Members absenting themselves without sending excuses 
as required by the By-laws were warned by a circular 
against the consequences of their default. A special 
Committee was appointed to revise the By-laws consist- 
ing of Brothers K. R. Cama, Murzban, D, R, Chichgar, 



188 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

J. D. Wadia, Jehangir Gustadji and J. C. Cama. Brother 
D. R. Chichgar was this year appointed the representa- 
tive of the lodge in future on the Masonic Hall Com- 
mittee and a Past Master's jewel and a time-piece voted 
to him by the lodge in recognition of his exertions and 
zeal in its interests were presented at a lodge meeting*, 
at which the Worshipful Master also presented to him a 
valuable masonic work as a slight token of the esteem in 
which he held him and of the services rendered to him in 
the general working of the lodge. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji who w r as at this time holding 
the high post of Honorary Depute Provincial Grand 
Master of Western India had, after a long-continued 
absence, attended the first meeting of the year, which 
was the installation meeting, as a Grand Lodge Officer 
with the Provincial Grand Lodge, and the minutes state 
that a peculiar incident of the evening was the warm 
and enthusiastic welcome accorded to him and his being 
greeted with grand honours as the founder and patriarch 
of the lodge. 

The finances were again in a good condition and the 
dinner fee of Rupee one was abolished. 

Ten new members were enrolled, of whom five were 
initiates and five affiliates. The initiates were Mr. (now 
Sir) Muncherjee Merwanji Bhownugree, Maneksha 
Dhanjishaw Doctor, Kaikusroo Nowroji Kabraji, Manekji 
Cowasji Entee and Shripad Babaji Thakar (C. S.). The 
affiliates were Brothers Jamsetji Cursetji Cama, Hormusji 
Muncherji Chichgar, Bala Mangesh Wagle, Shantaram 
Narayen and Ganesh Nilkant. Death claimed amongst 
its victims two good Masons this year, one of whom was 
a member of the lodge and on its rolls at the date of his 
death and the other one of its most distinguished Past 
Masters who had resigned only two years before his death, 
and for the first time in its history, the lodge performed 
the melancholy duty of holding funeral lodges in their 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 189 

memory. The member who died was Brother Rustomji 
Hormusji Mistry who during the brief space of three 
years and a quarter that he was a member of the lodge 
had served it as a steward and had made himself useful, 
and had impressed the brethren as a good Mason, so 
much that three brethren in commemoration of his 
demise contributed sums of money to the charity funds 
of the lodge. At the funeral lodge held to mourn his loss 
( and that was the very first one held by the lo dge) the 
lodge passed a resolution condoling with the widow of 
the deceased which was duly handed to her by a special 
deputation. 

The Past Master in whose memory the second funeral 
lodge was held, was Right Worshipful Brother M. M. 
Sethna. A regular lodge meeting convened before his 
death was postponed, and, under dispensation from the 
Provincal Grand Master (which had to be obtained as 
the deceased Brother was not at his death a member of 
the lodge) an emergent meeting was held for the funeral 
service in his memory as an exceptional case, and after, a 
very solemn ceremony and after drinking to his memory 
in sacred silence the brethren passed resolutions recording 
their deep regret at his death and their sense of the loss 
to the native fraternity by the death of such an amiable, 
esteemed and influential Mason and condoling with the 
family of the deceased, and these resolutions were handed 
to his son and heir Mr. Ardesir by a special deputation 
consisting of the Right Worshipful Master and Brothers 
K. R., Cama, Murzban, D. R. Chichgar and others. The 
lodge also passed a resolution that in order to perpetuate 
the deceased's memory, a subscription should be raised 
amongst the members and the amount thereof should be 
added to the promissory loan notes for Rs. 500 present- 
ed by him some years ago as an endowment fund subject 
to the same conditions as attached to the said loan note, 
and the whole fund should be named " The Mer wan ji 



190 HISTORY' OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Manekji Sett Charity Fund." This was a fitting tribute 
to the memory of the deceased who was no doubt a 
warm-hearted and sincere friend of the lodge. 

Mr. Ardeshir Merwanji Sett thanked the lodge for its 
condolence and at the same time handed a Government 
Promissory Loan Note for Rupees Five Hundred as a con- 
tribution to the fund resolved to be raised to perpetuate 
his fa ther's memory. This was the second endowment 
after the first one made by Brother M, M, Sett himself. 



CHAPTER XXI. 

1874. It seemed as if funeral lodges were going to 
follow in quick succession for in the year 1874 also the 
lodge had to repeat its sorrowful duty of holding two 
such lodges, one in memory of Brother Rustomji Sorabji 
Punegar, who was on the roll of members at his death, 
and the other in memory of Brother Dossabhai Hormusji 
Cama who after a nine years* membership had resigned 
in 1872. Suitable resolutions were also passed recording 
regret at the deaths. 

The Worshipful Master was Brother J. D. Wadia. The 
ceremony of his installation was performed by Right 
Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama again in his capacity of 
Substitute Provincial Grand Master of Western India by 
desire of the Provincial Grand Master, who was also 
present. Brother Cama at this meeting also conferred 
upon the Worshipful Master and his substitute and 
depute the installed Master's degree which had then been 
only recently sanctioned by the Grand Lodge of Scotland, 
upon the personal recommendation made by the Provincial 
Grand Master Brother Morland while he was there, 
th ough it appears it had been repeatedly and for a long 
time before been proposed but without avail. 

This year however was lucky in attracting back to the 
fold as rejoining members Brothers D. F. Karaka, F. D . 
Bahadurji, A. J. Bhajiwalla and Hormusji Diidabhai. 
There was a further accession of one initiate, viz., Din- 
shaBomanji Vakil, and one joining member, viz., Brother 
Sorabji Jamsetji Mehta of Ledge Rising Sun. Against 
this increase, there wore .two resignations and one death. 



192 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

There was only one initiation during the whole year. 
Lectures were delivered on the tracing boards by Bro- 
ther R. C. Nadirshaw and one interesting lecture on ''5 
pointed stars" was delivered by Brother D. R. Chichgar. 

For the first time in the annals of Freemasonry in Bom- 
bay and for the matter of that in India, on. the 21st of 
March this year was celebrated a festival under the name 
of "The Jamshedi Navroz Masonic Festival/' under the 
auspices of the lodge and the three other native lodges 
then working in Bombay. The idea of holding the festi- 
val originated with Brother K. R. Cama and had suggest- 
ed itself to him from the annual celebration of the festi- 
val of the Vernal Equinox by the French Masons called 
"The Vernal Equinox Fete" of which he knew. Brother 
Cama read a discourse on the occasion and therein he 
showed how the festival notwithstanding any external 
appearance to the contrary and the general belief that it 
was peculiarly appropriate to the Parsees alone was a 
truly masonic one though promulgated under the novel 
designation which was then applied to it for the first 
time. The discourse was afterwards printed and publish- 
ed for the use of the subscribers to enable them the 
better to discuss and digest the matters therein contain- 
ed. It was stated therein that it was King Jamshed, the 
second monarch of the old Peshdanian dynasty, who in- 
troduced the Solar year in the ancient Persian Calendar 
and ordained that the first day of it, namely 21st March, 
should be kept perpetually fixed at the Vernal Equinox 
when the Sun enters the first point of the sign Aeries of 
the Zodiac, when spring sets in and all nature looks 
regenerated and reawakened from its long winter sleep, 
and that that practice was continued regularly for ages 
till the downfall of the ancient Persian Empire and the 
extinction of the power of the ancient Persian race 
brought on a temporary interruption, for the conquerors 
of the land reckoned no Solar year in their Calendar but 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 ti.C. 193 

counted upon the moon and the Jamshedi Navroz conse- 
quently ceased to be a national holiday till another 
monarch who ascended the throne of modern Persia 
ordained his subjects on a memorable Vernal Equinox 
day to begin a new era in his name from that day and 
the Jamshedi Navroz festival became again a national 
one in Persia with this difference, however, that as it was 
introduced by the Sultan of Persia it was styled the 
Sultani Navroz in place of the Jamshedi Navroz. It was 
further stated that the Jamshedi Navroz had relation 
with Freemasonry in that Freemasonry enjoined its 
professors to study nature and sciences, including the 
science of astronomy, which laid down the Vernal and 
Autumnal Equinoxes and the summer and winter solstices 
as accurate turning points of the weather, the Vernal 
Equinox, being the most marked as being the very first 
quarter and that high festivals were held to celebrate 
these turning points and in a special and eminent 
manner by Freemasons from the earliest ages, that in 
France all the seasonal festivals were celebrated by their 
proper names and on their own proper days by the 
Masonic fraternity as laid down in the Book of Constitu- 
tions of the Grand Orient of France, under which the 
Vernal Equinox was celebrated by all the Chapters, the 
Autumnal Equinox by the High Grades, Encamped, 
Councils, etc., and both the solstices by the Blue Lodges, 
that in Ireland the Masonic year as regards the proceed- 
ings of the Supreme Grand Council commenced under the 
Book of Constitutions of the Grand Lodge of Ireland at 
the Vernal Equinox or 21st March, and that under the 
Constitutions of Royal Arch Masonry Grand Office- 
bearers were elected and installed on the Vernal Equinox 
day and the Office-bearers of the subordinate Chapters on 
the Autumnal Equinox day. Lastly it was shown in the 
discourse that Blue Lodges which had the solstices weie 
always dedicated to the two Saints, viz., St. John the 

13 



194 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, the Patron Saints 
of Blue Masonry, and that the festivals of these Saints 
fell, of one, on 24th June in ths Summer Solstice and of 
the other on 27th December in the Winter Solstice, 
that installation meetings of all lodges were held on 
those days or as near as possible thereto, and that the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland used to have a grand festival 
on Saint John the Baptist's Day until it was decided at a 
quarterly communication held on 13th April 1837 to 
celebrate the annual election not on that day but on the 
30th November, the birthday of St, Andrew, the titular 
Saint of Scotland. 

In this connection it may be noted here that under the 
old By-laws of Lodge Rising Star the Master was instal- 
led on St. John the Evangelist's Day and the members 
were enjoined to hold a special convivial meeting in each 
year to celebrate the anniversary of that Saint. 

The Provincial Grand Master had intimated to all 
the lodges this year that they should have a banner of 
their own to represent them at the Provincial Grand 
Lodge and as an established custom all Blue Lodges 
under the Sun were required to have their banners. 
The lodge therefore commissioned Brother Murzban, 
who was then shortly proceeding to England, to have a 
banner made there. 

In this year's report of the Grand Lodge it was stated 
that Lodge Rising Star was very admirably managed 
and was in a most flourishing condition both as regards 
members and funds and was the premier Native Lodge. 

1875. Brother R. J. Nadirshaw was the Worshipful 
Master in the year 1875. This year was a memorable one 
for the lodge, as it was for the whole of India. His Royal 
Highness the Prince of Wales was on a visit to India and 
during his stay in Bombay laid the foundation stone of the 
Prince's Dock on llth November 1875 according to Maso- 
nic rites and ceremonies. His Royal Highness was the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 1 95 

Grand Master of the United Fraternity of Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons of England and Patron of Scottish 
Freemasonry, and an address signed by Right Worshipful 
Brother Henry Morland as the head of the Scottish 
Lodges in India and by Worshipful Brother James Gibbs 
as the District Grand Master, E. C., was presented on the 
same day to his Royal Highness on b ehalf of the G. L. A,, 
S. F. I. and the District Grand Lodge, and the Masters, 
Wardens, and Brethren of all the lodges working in Bom- 
bay under the English and Scottish banners, A Committee 
had been formed to conduct the ceremony and Lodge 
Rising Star had the honour of being represented there- 
on by Brothers Jehangir Gustadji and Hormusji Dada- 
bhai. The lodge had also the rare honour and privilege 
of being allowed to present the Burne's medal to His 
Royal Highness. It had been voted in advance of His 
Royal Highness' arrival upon Brother K. R. Cama's motion 
and a Committee was appointed consisting of this Bro- 
ther and the Worshipful Master and Brothers Murzban, 
P. M. Mehta and J. D. Wadia for the purpose of carrying 
out the object. Through the very kind offices of the Grand 
Master, Brother Morland, the medal was presented to His 
Royal Highness at the foundation stone ceremony of the 
Prince's Dock. It was ornamented by a design prepared by 
Brother Murzban representing His Royal Highness' 
plumes and two figures, one of a Parsi lady, and the 
other of a Hindu lady, and encased in a box specially pre- 
pared by Brother J. D. Wadia. The Grand Master said 
at the time of the presentation, " Your Royal Highness, 
the Lodge Rising Star of Western India No. 342 on the 
rolls of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, the first Native 
Lodge in India, having been established in 1843, has 
hitherto been honoured by the Grand Masters of Eng- 
land and Scotland receiving their Fundator's medal and 
I have been deputed by the brethren to request on this 
occasion your gracious acceptance of this medal" and His 



196 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Royal Highness was graciously pleased to say " I have the 
greatest pleasure in accepting it." 

Brother James Gibbs, the District Grand Master of 
Bombay and its territories and one of the Judges of the 
High Court of Bombay, who was an affiliated member 
ever since 1847, was elected an honorary member this 
year. 

The banner of the lodge arrived this year and cost 
Rupees 164. It is of an unique design. It consists of 
two parts, an upper and a lower one, which are held to- 
gether by a brass rod. The upper part is in the shape of 
a triangle, the lower one in that of an apron- On the 
two sides of the triangle are depicted the 12 signs of the 
Zodiac and within it is the figure of a temple in Persepo- 
Jis, On the flap of the apron are shown the Sun and 
the Moon with the altar between them, emblematic of the 
three greater lights in Masonry. In the body of the 
apron is a representation of Mt. Elburz and on the border 
are the volume of the Sacred Law lying open with an 
unsheathed sword and its scabbard on one side, and a 
dagger on the other., The apron is rounded off at the 
lower ends, after the shape of an apron said to have been 
found from among the ruins of Persepolis- 

From an inventory inter alia of the Lodge clothing 
taken this year it appears that up to this time sashes 
still formed part of it. 

It was this year that, under a commission issued in the 
early part of the last year, the Grand Lodge of Scotland, 
the G. L. A. S. F. I. was inaugurated and Brother Mor- 
land as the head of the constitution assumed the title 
of G. M. A. S. F. I. Brother P.M.Mehta presented to the 
Grand Master, on behalf of the lodge, an address voted 
to him by the lodge congratulating him on the dignity 
conferred on him by the Grand Lodge of Scotland. 

Right Worshipful Brother P. M. Mehta was presented 
with a Past Master's clothing and jewel. 





|_odge Banner 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 19? 

There were three initiations, two passings, and two 
raisings and lectures were delivered including a lecture 
on ballot by Brother D. R. Chichgar which was 
ordered to be published. 

Three new members were enrolled, viz., Jug ji van 
Atmaram, Rahimtulla Mahomed Sayani (Solicitor) and 
Dr. Atmaram Pandurang. Brother Pestanji Dajibhai 
Unwalla rejoined while Brother Sherif Salemahomed , 
resigned the lodge. 



CHAPTER XXII. 

1876. The next year 1876, during which Brother 
Darasha D. Reporter was the Master, brought in eight 
new members, of whom three were affiliates and the rest 
initiates. The affiliates were Brother Bomansha Cowasji 
of Lodge Eastern Star and Nusserwanji Pestanji 
Cama and Nowroji Pestanji Cama of Lodge Marquis of 
Dalhousie, London. The initiates were-Fazulbhai Cas- 
umbhai Gangji, Dr. Succaram Arjoon, Cursetji Manekji 
Sett, Moreshwar Atmaram Tarkhad and Krishnaji Lax- 
man. Against this increase there were, however, four 
resignations, viz., of Brother 3 Dossabhai Framji Karaka 
(again on account of ill health), Brother Maneckji Cursetji 
Bomanji Cursetji Ashburner and Manekji Ratanji Repor- 
ter. Brother Maneckji Cursetji was, immediately after 
his resignation, unanimously elected an honorary member 
of the lodge in recognition of the signal services ren- 
dered by him. 

Brother Bomanji Cursetji Ashburner or Bhandupwalla 
had joined the lodge in 1870, and had received his first 
degree in that year and was passed during this year. 
Before he could be raised an unpleasant incident hap- 
pened. This Brother had published a book on Freema- 
sonry in which he presumed to make insinuations against 
its principiles and to criticise the conduct of the brethren 
and had made use of words such as mockery, disgrace, etc., 
in relation to the conduct of the brethren in lodge assem- 
bled. Brother P. M. Mehta brought up the matter at a 
lodge meeting and made a vehement attack on the book 
and its author. Brother Bomanji was present and said he 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 19 1 

was quite unprepared, for an explanation there and then 
but would give one at the next meeting, and begged the 
conferring of the sublime degree to be deferred and was 
allowed to withdraw. He subsequently sent in his resig- 
nation instead of an explanation, but as it was couched in 
unmasonic terms it was not accepted and the charges 
made by Brother Mehta were referred to the Standing 
Committee for report. That body in due course submitted 
its opinion that Brother Bomanji having failed to render 
any explanation as promised and the statements in his 
book being unfounded, thoroughly vague 'and undefined 
and being extremely childish and frivolous, it would be 
undignified to attlach any importance to the book and to 
take any proceedings against him and recommended that 
as he had already expressed his intention to sever his 
connection with the lodge his resignation should be ac- 
cepted if couched in proper masonic language. Subse- 
quently that Brother sent in another resignation, and it 
was accepted. This was the second instance in which 
the lodge took notice of a Brother's unmasonic conduct 
and compelled him to sever his connection for all times. 
This Brother had previously presented to the lodge a 
handsomely framed portrait of H. R. H. the Prince of 
Wales which was in due course hung up in the hall. 

There were four initiations, three passings and two 
raisings, and some lectures were delivered by the Wor- 
shipful Master on "Brotherly Love ' and ' Life and 
Death/' 

An inventory of the lodge library was taken, with the 
result that nineteen valuable books were found missing-. 

Brother K. R. Cama was appointed by the lodge life- 
member on its behalf of the Scottish Masonic Benevolent 
Fund in accordance with the By-laws of that fund. 

A Past Master's jewel and clothing were voted to 
Brother R. J. Nadirsha which, at his request, was in the 
following year substituted by a Fundator's medal. 



200 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The Navroz festival was held also during this year 
and the lodge took part in it. 

It is recorded that at a meeting held on 5th February, 
the Worsihpful Master signed diplomas of two brethren, 
Lientenant Kiddie of the S. S. Raleigh and Brother 
Schull, and one or two other European brethren certifying 
to their identity ; they were admitted into the lodge that 
evening as visiting brethren. 

Brother Darasha Reporter was a capable and an 
earnest Master and his regime, which was otherwise full 
of success and happiness, was marred by two unpleasant 
incidents, which not only brought him into disfavour 
with one of the best friends of the lodge, namely, the 
Grand Master, Brother Morland, but also threw the 
lodge, though for a very brief space of time, under a 
cloud from which happily it came forth again with its 
former lustre and credit untarnished. 

The 'first incident was the writing of a letter by the 
Worshipful Master to the Grand Master, in which the 
latter' s non-attendance at the installation of the former, 
after being twice requested by him personally to attend, 
was considered a small matter, and the ceremony was 
stated to have gone off equally well. This was considered 
offensive by the Grand Master. 

The second incident was connected with the foundation 
of Lodge Islam. At that time besides Lodge Rising Star 
there were three other native lodges working in Bombay, 
namely, Lodge Rising Sun and Lodge Eastern Star under 
the English banner and Lodge Cyrus under the Scottish 
jurisdiction. Brother Morland, who had for some time 
then an intention of founding a Mahomedan Lodge, 
granted a warrant for the establishment of Lodge Islam 
for Mahomedans. The existing native lodges were not 
consulted in the matter. The subject was considered as 
one of great impDrtance and affecting the interests of 
Freemasonry amongst natives generally, and such as 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 201 

should be taken up fry all the native lodges in co-opera- 
tion. Some members considered that a representation 
should be submitted to the Grand Master by all the 
lodges but on Brother K. R. Cama pointing out that the 
Grand Master had supreme control and that steps should 
be taken in a regular and temperate manner the idea 
was abandoned. Brother Cama then himself carried on 
correspondence with the Grand Master and also argued 
the matter with him at personal interviews and detailed 
all the circumstances and'the purport of the correspond- 
ence at an emergent meeting called for the purpose, at 
which the following resolution was passed ; " That 
although this lodge is of opinion that no necessity for 
opening an additional native lodge in Bombay has 
been proved and the opinions of the existing native 
lodges were not invited, as was desirable, before granting 
dispensation for sich new lodge, still considering that 
such dispensation has already been granted and such 
new lodge has by the name of Islam already com- 
menced work under such dispensation this lodge 
deems it conducive to the interests of Freemasonry to 
welcome and co-operate with such new lodge and 
trusts that such new lodge would co-operate with this 
and tohe other native lodges in Bombay in striving to 
carry out the grand design of Freemasonry in general 
and to maintain the character, position and reputation 
of our Holy Order in the estimation of the native 
community by enforcing judicious and discriminate 
management in the lodge and exemplary conduct in the 
individual members thereof/' 

One member thought that the correspondence between 
the Grand Master and Brother Cama showed that there 
was nothing like a guarantee that in future full inquiries 
would be made before granting a dispensation, and 
another concurring in that view expressed the opinion 
that the establishment of a sectarian lodge was subver- . 

16 



202 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

sive of the noble principles of Freemasonry and that it 
was absurd to found a lodge for a particular sect exclu- 
sively. Copies of the whole proceedings of the evening 
were forwarded to the Grand Master and Lodges Rising 
Sun, Eastern Star, Cyrus and Islam, 

Brother Morland attended at the next meeting at 
which the proceedings were confirmed, but as an hono- 
rary member, and acknowledged the moderation of the 
view taken by the lodge and that the resolution was a 
very commendable one but he was much offended by the 
remarks about there being no guarantee for thle future 
and the absurdity of a sectarian lodge and at the pro- 
ceedings being published by being transmitted not only 
to the new lodge but also to the lodges under the sister 
constitution. Thereupon correspondence passed between 
the Grand Master and the Worshipful Master personally 
in which the Grand Master called upon the Worshipful 
Master to recall the minutes and to strike off certain 
portions which he considered disrespectful, and the 
Worshipful Master declined evidently to do it by reason 
of which the Grand Master was much put out. After 
this a summons convening a lodge meeting was issued 
which the Grand Master considered was as regards one 
item of business specified thereon in very objectionable 
terms, and he therefore in his official capacity attended 
the meeting with his Grand Lodge Officers to see that 
item discussed in his own presence. That item had 
evidently reference to the correspondence between the 
Grand Master and the Worshipful Master of the lodge, 
and the Worshipful Master considering that it would be 
indelicate to discuss the matter in the presence of the 
Grand Master and also as the hour was far advanced 
did not proceed with it. The Grand Master objected to 
this and made certain remarks imputing intentional 
delay, whereupon Brother P. M. Mental spoke strongly on 
the right of the lodge to discuss matters of importance 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 203 

after its own method and at its own convenience and 
claimed for the lodge the right of free discussion and 
supported the Worshipful Master in his action, stating 
that the lodge had always been loyal and obedient to the 
Grand Lodge. The Grand Master then spoke at length, 
justifying his action and narrating all that had passed 
between him and the Worshipful Master and made cer- 
tain remarks doubting the loyalty of the lodge, and after 
leaving on the altar the Fundator's medal which the lodge 
had presented to him retired from the meeting with his 
Officers. The remarks made by him about the lodge were 
deemed quite unmerited and it was resolved to hold an 
emergent meeting to consider them- 



CHAPTER XXIII. 



1877 The year 1877 thus opened ominously but by 
wise and tactful means adopted by the Master, Brother 
R. M. Patel, the consideration of the subject which 
had so much excited the members in the previous 
year was deferred from time to time and ultimately 
allowed to drop. The correspondence between the Grand 
Master and the Immediate Past Master was more than 
once called for and attempts were made, and not without 
reason, by some members to have it read and discussed 
but the Immediate Past Master was advised to make up 
matters which had become so personal between him and 
the Grand Master and to avoid further friction- Wiser 
counsels prevailed with the result that he did close the 
matter very soon with the Grand Master to the latter"s 
satisfaction and the correspondence was not brought out 
and no discussion took place thereon. The Grand Master 
thereafter sent back for the Fundator's medal and 
very shortly afterwards attended a meeting at which 
he installed Brother R. M. Patel in the Eastern 
Chair with the medal bedecking his breast and took 
occasion to say that he was very proud to instal a mem- 
ber of an old family and one of literary fame as the 
Master of a lodge whose loyalty was unswerving and 
was composed of such a large number of members from 
the different professions the Right Worshipful Master 
had named (viz., the Bench, the Bar, Engineering, 
Medicine and Commerce) and added that he was de- 
lighted to have been again present in the lodge and 
wished them every happiness and prosperity. He 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 205 

also on a subsequent occasion when he attended as an 
Honorary Member suggested that a Past Master's 
jewel should be presented to Brother Darasha Reporter 
(about which there had been some discussion, of which 
however he was not aware) and the jewel was in due 
course voted to that Brother. . 

A Past Master's jewel and clothing were presented to 
Brother Jamsetji Dhanjibhai Wadia and the Fundator's 
medal was presented to Brother R. J. Nadirahaw. 

Brother Cursetji Nusserwanji Cama was appointed 
Substitute Master this year and therefore vacated the 
post of Treasurer which he had held for fourteen years, 
and a Treasurer's jewel was voted to him in further 
recognition of his valuable services as Treasurer. 

The Naoroz festival was held also during this, year 
and the lodge took part in it, 

The numerical strength decreased this year. There was 
an addition of only one member while there were 
five resignations. The new member was Mr. Ardesir 
Merwanji Sett and the resigning members were Brothers 
F. R. Vicaji, E. C. Jussawalla, F. N. Sett, B. D. Patel and 
H. A- Suntoke. The degree work during the year 
consisted of two initiations, five passings and. five raisings. 
The finances were in a healthy condition. From Novem- 
ber of this year the lodge removed from the Gowalia 
Tank Road building and began to assemble in a bunga- 
low in Nesbit Lane, Mazagon, known as the Nawab's 
Bungalow. 

1878. The lodge was presided over in 1878 by 
Brother Hormusji Dadabhai. In all twelve regular 
meetings and nine Standing Committee meetings . were 
held and there were two initiations, two passings and 
two raisings and some lectures were given. Three new 
members were enrolled, viz., Dr. Temulji Bhicaji Nari- 
man (who is still on the rolls) and Hormusji Shapur ji 
(Solicitor) as initiates and Right Worshipful Brother 



206 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Mackintosh Balfour as an Honorary Member. Brother. 
Morland had resigned the office of Grand Master last year 
and Brother Balfour, who was his deputy, was now 
holding that exalted office. 

In compliance with a request made by the Worshipful 
Master of Lodge Mooltan, the Worshipful Master of 
Lodge Rising Star presented at a regular meeting a com- 
plimentary letter received by him to a Brother of the 
name of Dadabhai Manekji, Past Senior Warden of that 
lodge, which was voted to him with a jewel by that 
lodge in recognition of hiis services to it. 

This year also the lodge took part in the Naoroz festi- 
val. A sword was presented to the lodge by Brother 
Sorabji Jamsetji Mehta. 

The Past Master's jewel and clothing voted to Brother 
R. M. Patel were duly presented to him. 

The lodge was, however, very unfortunate in losing 
three good members, two of whom were its very ener- 
getic and useful Past Masters, viz., Brothers R. C. 
Bahadurji and R. J. Nadirshaw, at the commencement of 
the year, and the third was Brother A. M. Sett, who was 
but only a year-old Mason and died when the year closed. 

Funeral service was held in honour of the Past 
Masters at a regular meeting which was attended by a 
very large gathering, including the Grand Master and the 
Past Grand Master, Brother Morland, and resolutions 
were passed recording the loss sustained by the lodge 
by the death of these two warm-hearted friends who 
had endeared themselves to the brethren by their devoted 
faithfulness to the principles of our noble Order and 
won their great esteem and respect and extolling their 
attainments and virtues, and offering condolence to 
their widows and children, and the resolutions were 
directed to be published in the Bombay Masonic Standard. 
Very touching observations were made on this occasion 
by Brothers Mackintosh and Morland and some excellent 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 207 

and appropriate speeches were made by some of the 
brethren on the separation from these two amiable and 
distinguished Past Masters, and the record shows that the 
scene was one which impresed the brethren with the 
solemn feelings produced by parting by death on the 
human mind and by the splendid teaching we receive when 
the sublime degree is worked. It would be impossible 
now to portray such a scene which only those who 
witnessed it could appreciate. 

Resolutions were also passed recording the regret of 
the lodge at the death of its very young and unassuming 
member, Brother A. M. Sett, and tendering sympathy to 
his widow and children. 

1879. The next year the lodge wais again presided 
over by Brother Hormusji Dadabhai and was prosperous 
both numerically and financially. Eight new members 
joined while only two resigned. The new members were 
Ilormusji Adarji Kanga, Sorabsha Dorabsha Doctor, 
Temulji Bhikhaji Engineer, Pes,tonji Muncherji Nicholson 
and Nusserwanji Merwanji Panday, all initiates, and 
Brothers Nanabhai Ratanji Chichgar, Cooverji Cowasji 
Jussa walla and Nanaji Narayen Waslekar who were 
affiliated. The last named Brother belonged to Lodge 
Fidelity No. 430, Dukenfeld, near Manchester. There 
were five initiations, three passings and ;one raising and 
some lectures were delivered. The resigning members 
were Brothers P. D. Bahadurji and Dr. R. N. Khory. 

Two very pleasing functions were performed during the 
year. Worshipful Brother the Hon'ble Mr. Justice 
James Gibbs, who was the District Grand Master of Bom- 
bay and its territories, and had controlled for some years 
the destinies of English Freemasonry and during whose 
rule the relationship and co-operation between the Eng- 
lish and Scotch Lodges had become closer and freer than 
ever before and who had in a great measure effectuated 
an arrangement under which the bodies under both juris- 



208 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

dictions were then meeting in one and the same building, 
retired from service and left the shores of Bombay. 
Before his departure, however, a farewell demonstration 
and banquet were given in his honour by the District 
Grand Lodge as also by the Grand Lodge A. S, F. I., in 
which the Lodge Rising Star was invited to join and 
did so. But as that distinguished Brother was a member 
of the lodge ever since 1847, first as an affiliated and lat- 
terly as an Honorary Member and had always taken an 
abiding interest in its welfare, the lodge presented to 
him an address at a farewell meeting held on 1st March 
which was numerously attended. (For copies of the 
address and Brother Gibb's reply to it see Appendix P.) 
He spoke in terms of very high praise and with a sense 
of pride at having been connected with the Star for 
over 30 years, and said " he hoped to hand down the 
address to his children after him and possibly to his 
children's children, so that it would at all events serve 
as a memorial to inform them that their father and pos- 
sibly their ancestor was a member of Lodge Rising Star, 
so highly he valued the membership of this lodge." 

The second pleasing function was the conferring by 
Brother D. R. Chichgar as officiating Worshipful Master 
at a regular meeting of the lodge held on 1st November 
of the installed Master's degree on two brethren who had 
served as Masters of Lodge Felix of Aden, No, 355 S. C., 
namely, Right Worshipful Brothers Charles Mounstuart 
Erskine and Pestonji Rustomji Toorkey. This was done 
in response to a request made by the Grand Secretary. 
It was indeed a matter of congratulation that this lodge 
should have been elected to perfom the function. Brother 
Erskine on that occasion made a small donation to the 
charity funds of the lodge. 

The Committee to revise the By-laws which was ap- 
pointed in the year 1873 did not appear to have done 
anything and a fresh Committee was therefore appointed 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 209 

for the same purpose consisting of the Worshipful 
Master and Brothers K. R. Cama, D- R. Chichgar, R. M. 
Patel, H. M. Chichgar and M. M. Bhownugree. This 
Committee revised the Bye-laws which were circulated 
amongst the brethren for consideration before being 
brought up for adoption, 

It was resolved this year that the Treasurer's accounts 
and the quarterly audits should show the endowment of 
Rupees five hundred made by the late Brother M. M. 
Sethna separate from the other charity funds. 

It was also resolved that itshould.be lawful for the 
Right Worshipful Master to appoint a Brother Mason to 
the office of Organist of the lodge and such Brother 
should during the tenure of his office be an ex-officio 
member of the lodge and be exempted from payment of 
the lodge dues but should have no right to Vote. This 
was done with the object of providing music during the 
working of the sublime degree in order to make it all the 
more impressive. Brother K. N. Kabraji was appointed 
in due course to this honorary post. 

Amongst the charities dispensed this year was a do- 
nation made to the fund raised by the Italian Consul at 
Bombay for the relief of the poor and distressed inhabi- 
tants of districts round about the provinces of Mentowa, 
Ferara Modena, in the Island of Sicily, who had been 
reduced to great privations by the overflowing of certain 
rivers and the violent eruption of Mount Etna. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 

1880. Brother Hormusji M. Chichgar was elected 
Worshipful Master for the next year by a majority of 
votes. The election was by mistake made while the lodge 
was open in the first lodge and this being contrary to 
the Constitutions it had to be validated by a special dis- 
pensation from the Grand Master. 

Brother Hormusji Dadabhai who had very efficiently 
worked the lodge during the preceding two years had 
also to work it during the year 1880, as the Worshipful 
Master was for the greater part of it unable to attend 
the meetings owing to illness. This worthy Brother 
was voted a Past Master's jewel and clothing for his 
services. 

Brother C. N. Cama received this year a further token 
of the appreciation of his services to the lodge in the 
shape of a gold chain and pencil presented to him by the 
unanimous vote of the brethren. 

The Naoroz'e festival took place also this year and the 
active management thereof had devolved on the lodge 
according to turn. The origin of the festival and 
its commencement were both identified with the lodge, 
and this time all past members of the lodges were also 
invited to meet and renew old fellowship of brethren in 
the Craft. 

A Brother named Pestonji Sorabji Anderson, Master 
Mason of Lodge Western Star No. 1049 of Cannanore, was 
allowed to sign at a lodge meeting a certificate from the 
Grand Lodge of England testifying to his being a regu- 
larly made Master Mason. It appears that this Brother 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 211 

was an habitual resident of Bombay, and while on a short 
trip to Cannanore on business in the beginning of the 
year 1878 gothimself admitted in the lodge. He was sub- 
sequently in 1879 proposed in Lodge Rising Star but his 
affiliation was adjourned for consideration. After, how- 
ever, this certificate from the Grand Lodge was signed it 
was taken up but did not meet with favour. 

It was resolved this year to buy a new set of working 
tools as the set the lodge had was lost. 

The Bye-laws of the lodge which had been revised by 
the last Sub-committee appointed for the purpose and 
had been already circulated amongst the brethren were 
discussed, amended and finally passsd at five meetings and 
were subsequently printed in the following year. It was 
now that the names " Bearer of the Sacred Volume" and 
"Organist" were substituted for "The Zend Avesta 
Bearer " and " Director of Music" respectively. 

The existing Bye-laws provided that the anniversary 
meeting should always be held on 15th December, that 
being the anniversary day of the foundation of the lodge, 
hut somehow or other on grounds of convenience the 
custom had not been followed for some years. From 
this year again the Bye-law was strictly followed and 
all anniversary meetings were held on 15th December of 
each year. 

An evil had by this time grown to an intolerable 
extent and had even attracted the attention of the 
Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, 
namely, the habit with some Masons of deriving all 
the advantages of a membership of the lodge by 
frequent visits without belonging to any particular 
lodge and paying for such privileges. Under the 
existing Bye-laws at the time, no Freemason who was 
not a subscribing member of some lodge, could be 
permitted to visit the lodge more than three times a 
year. This Bye-law was substituted by the Sub-corn- 



212 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

mittee by another providing that no Freemason, residing 
in Bombay but not a subscribing member to some lodge, 
should be permitted or invited to visit the lodge more 
than twice a year. The Worshipful Master thought the 
Bye-law was altogether unnecessary as it constitued an 
encroachment on a right which was the Master's absolute 
prerogative and besides was in conflict with the 
Constitutions and spirit of the Order which made it 
unmasonic to close the portals of a lodge to anyone 
seeking admission. The brethren thought the clause was 
congruous with the spirit of the Constitutions and 
landmarks of the Order and was necessary for checking 
the evil. Ultimately the Worshipful Master consented to 
the Bye-law being passed making its final retention in the 
book of Bye-laws dependent on the verdict of the Grand 
Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India to whom 
he proposed referring the question as to whether the 
clause was an encroachment on the Master's prero- 
gative and whether the words " permitted" or " invited" 
made the clause inconsistent with either the landmarks 
of the Order or the Constitutions, and which of the two 
words should be retained. 

Under another Bye-law one-fourth of all fees and not 
only of the monthly subscriptions was to be set apart 
for charity. This was an advance upon the then existing 
Bye-law on the point under which all degree fees went 
wholly to the general funds for the maintenance of 
the lodge itself. A Bye-law was also passed giving 
power to the Worshipful Master to adjourn a regular 
meeting, should the quality or nature of the business 
to be transacted thereat render an adjournment neces- 
sary, to any day prior to the assembling of the succeed- 
ing regular meeting. This was passed in order that a 
regular meeting instead of being held on the day 
fixed for it by the Bye-laws might be held on any other 
day that might suit the convenience of the brethren, for 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 213 

it many times happened that in January and June 
members were usually away from Bombay and the 
attendances were thin. 

The finances of the lodge were in a prosperous 
condition when the year ended and there were two 
initiations, four passings and three raisings. Two new 
members were admitted, namely, Manekji Hormusji 
Maju and Rustom K. R. Cama, the latter of whom was 
introduced by his venerable father and has, following 
in his wake so far, been a subscribing member of the 
lodge these thirty years, and Brother Sheriff Sale- 
mahomed rejoined but against this addition of three 
there were four resignations, namely, of the Brothers 
Dollymeherji and Sorabji Jamsetji Mehta and Succaram 
Arjoon. Amongst the office-bearers this year was 
Brother Atmaram Pandurang, appointed as Bhagwat- 
Gita bearer. 

1881. Brother H. M. Chichgar was re-elected Wor- 
shipful Master for the year 1881 by a majority of votes. 

The second year of this Brother's rule saw the nume- 
rical strength of the lodge still further decreased for only 
one new member was admitted, namely, Brother Cursetji 
Cowasji Mehta, while three members resigned, namely, 
Brothers H. A. Kanga, F. C. Ganji and Nowroji Dajibhai 
Un walla. 

The finances however remained steady. 

The degree work done consisted of one initiation, one 
passing and three raisings, and a lecture was delivered 
by Brother Darasha R. Chichgar on certain chemical 
facts illustrating the several mysteries of the science of 
Freemasonry. 

The Bye-laws of tfhe lodge which were revised last 
year were approved by the Grand Lod^e with certain 
variations and passed and printed during this year. The 
Grand Lodge had disapproved the Bye-law giving the 
Worshipful Master power to adjourn a regular meeting 



214 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

to any day prior to the day fixed for the next regular 
meeting on the ground that in Masonry it would be 
unlawful to adjourn a regular meeting fixed by the 
Bye-laws, but that the Master could call emergent meet- 
ings for considering any business remaining unfinished 
at a regular meeting. 

A further Bye-law was therefore passed during this 
year empowering the Worshipful Master to summon the 
January and June meetings on any convenient day instead 
of the regular meeting days fixed for the rest of the 
year. 

The clause relating to visiting brethren was approved 
by the Grand Lodge, modified only so far as it cut down 
two visits to one visit only during the year, and the 
ground given was that a non-affiliated Mason residing 
in Bombay for more than twelve months without joining 
some lodge would violate his obligation. 

Some Bye-laws were amended during the year, one of 
them being that relating to the allocation of the fees 
between the general and the charity funds which now 
again provided that one-fourth of the monthly subscrip- 
tions only should be set apart for charity and the other 
relating to the particulars to be mentioned in a summons 
convening a meeting regarding a proposed candidate 
by which the age and occupation of the candidate were 
also required to be specified. 

Besides the Bye-laws one o':her matter occupied the 
attention of the lodge and was discussed at several 
meetings both of the lodge and of the Standing Com- 
mittee. 

. The vacant land which had been presented by Brother 
Nowroji Nanabhai Framji to the lodge and had been 
conveyed to the Trustees for the lodge on 3rd May 1870, 
and was then estimated to be of the value of Rs. 16,000 
.had been yielding at first an income of about Rs. 55 to 
60 per annum, then of Rs- 115 to 120, and latterly about 



OF WESTERN INDIA No,. 342 S.C, 215 

Rs, 150 per annum, realised by the sale of the right of 
collecting grass grown thereon and picketing horses 
imported ' from Kabul. It was low-lying land situate 
near the Byculla Flats and more than once offers had 
been received for the purchase thereof at from eight 
annas to eleven annas per square yard but the lodge had 
not deemed it advisable to sell it, The Municipality had at 
this time served the Trustees with a requisition to fill in 
the land and the cost of filling in was estimated at about 
Rs. 2,000. The Trustees had no funds in their hands and 
the income derived from the date of the trust deed till 
this time had been utilized by mistake contrary to the 
provisions of the deed in the general expenditure of the 
lodge instead of being accumulated for the purposes of 
the contemplated Framji Oowasji Masonic Hall and 'the 
Trstees ha d no power to raise moneys nor had the lodge 
power according to its Bye-laws to lend money. The 
question therefore had to be seriously considered and a 
Sub-Committee consisting of the Trustees and Brothers 
H. M. Chichgar and Hormusjee Dadabhai was appointed 
to consider the trust deed and to frame a scheme for 
submission to the lodge. This Sub-Committee being of 
opinion (in which the Standing Committee concurred) 
that unless the lodge passed a resolution not to build a 
Masonic Hall on the land, no sale could be made, a reso- 
lution to that effect was brought forward. Thereafter a 
printed copy of the trust deed was circulated amongst 
the members to enable them to consider whether or 
not it was advisable to sell the land and whether the 
lodge should consider the resolution before it came to 
a decision to sell. The resolution was then brought up 
and discussed but the members were not all of one mind. 
In the meantime the question of erecting a Masonic 
Temple for all bodies under the English and Scottish 
banners was it seems reaching a stage of completion 
and the District Grand Master, Brother Tyrell Leith, who 



21G HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAti 

was present at the last meeting at which the resolution 
was discussed, suggested to the Worshipful Master that 
the lodge should postpone the discussion thereon and 
the suggestion was adopted by the lodge and the re- 
solution was for the time being abandoned. It appears 
that subsequently at a Grand Lodge Convocation held 
on 29th October 1881, it was resolved on the motion of 
the Grand Master to form a Joint Stock Company for the 
construction of a Masonic Hall to be called "The Framji 
Cowasji Masonic Hall " and some arrangement was 
made for handing over the land to the Company to build 
a Temple thereon. At this Convocation, Brother J. D. 
Wadia was appointed Honorary Grand Master Depute 
and Brother D. R. Chichgar was appointed Grand Senior 
Warden and a Committee was appointed consisting of 
Brothers K. R. Cama Murzban, D. R. Chichgar and 
R. V. Reid to d-raw up Articles of Association of the 
proposed Company. 

While, however, this question was vexing the brethren 
a proposition was also made and discussed for investing 
the lodge funds in the purchase or mortgage of real 
estate in the City of Bombay with the object of enabling 
the lodge to lend moneys thereout to the Trustees of the 
land in case it became necessary to do so for defraying 
the cost of the filling in of the land. This proposition 
was opposed by Brother P. M. Mehta on the solid ground 
that the lodge funds should be of a permanent character 
and kept free from all risks, being made to last as long as 
the Sun and Moon endured and should not be hazarded 
in investments of a speculative character for there were 
always fluctuations of a serious and grave character in 
the value of real properties. This proposition was also 
thereupon dropped. 

The jewel voted to Brother Darasha Reporter was 
presented to him at the close of this year and a Past 
Master's jewel was voted to Brother H. M. Chichgar, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 217 

who had proved a very energetic and painstaking 
master. 

It seemed to be the practice of the lodge to raise the 
Substitute-Master to the throne, but this year the Brother 
who filled that office came forward most modestly and 
argued that owing to his youth and inexperience he 
should be passed over and his wish was complied with, 
and Brother Khory, who for several years now had the 
control of the finance department, was elected to fill 
the chair. 



!- 18 



CHAPTER XXV. 



1882. This year there was only one initiation, one 
passing and one raising, and one new member, Mr. 
Nowrosji Maneckji Contractor, was admitted while three 
Brothers, namely, Brothers F. R. Vicaji Burjorji, P. 
Doilimeherji and H. N. Saklatwalla rejoined. Against 
this there were four resignations, namely of Brothers P. 
M. Mehta, C. C. Jussawall, J, J. Panthakey and Dr. 
Atmaram Pandurang. Brother Saklatwalla died within 
a short time after he had rejoined. 

The financial condition was much in the same state. 
The Jamshedi Naoroze festival was celebrated this year 
also, and a gratifying circumstance of the celebration 
was that a good number of European brethren joined 
in it- 

A very laudable movement was set afoot this year by 
and under the auspices of the Grand Lodge. A resolu- 
tion was passed by the Grand Lodge on 22nd April 1882 
upon a proposition of the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master, seconded by Brother Henry Morland, that 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji should be requested to sit for 
his portrait, and that it be hung in the Freemasons' Hall, 
and a Committee consisting of Brothers Morland Jam- 
shedji Dhunjibhoy Wadia, Darasha R. Chichgar, M. C. 
Murzban, I. Y. Lang, E. R. Freeborn and others was 
appointed to carry out the objects. 

The Most Worshipful the Grand Master in moving the 
proposition said : 

" In our venerable and esteemed friend you see the 
father, the pioneer of Freemasonry among the Native 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 219 

gentlemen of India, the great social reformer who has 
made it possible for all of us, of different castes and 
creeds, to meet together and labour in the cause of 
Freemasonry. The difficulties he experienced and sur- 
mounted are known to many of you. How great they were 
you can fully appreciate when you remember the extent 
to which caste prejudices prevailed, and that only a short 
time ago we were able to admit Hindus to the light of 
Masonry. Now we are a happy family and we have to 
thank Brother Maneckji very much for the stage at which 
we have arrived. He was made a Mason in Paris, and 
here in Bombay he was a contemporary of and collaborator 
with the late well-known and distinguished Brother the 
Chevalier Burnes. Brother Maneckji had from those days, 
long gone by, laboured steadily and zealously in the 
cause of our Craft. Even now, in his old age, his we'l- 
known features and costume are seen in our assemblies 
more regularly than those of many Younger brethren 
who consider themselves earnest workers. Does not our 
Brother deserve all honour for introducing what I may 
call " Freetrade " in Freemasonry, and what is more, 
Freetrade in female education, at least on this side of 
India ? The interest which our friend takes in the 
Alexandra Girls' School of which he was the founder, 
the first of the kind for Nativa girls of all sects is 
well known and it is part of his life. The barriers of 
caste are being gently put aside and I venture to say that 
Masonry in India is giving to the brethren an education 
as necessary and useful as that which can be obtained 
in schools and collages. Brethren, I wish Brother Man- 
eckji's portrait to be hung up here as proof that the Grand 
Lodge knows how to honour those who deserve honour at 
its hands, and that in after years when he shall have 
passed away the picture may be pointed out as that of 
the Brother who first introduced Freemasonry among 
the Natives of India, who following faithfully the teach- 



220 HISTORY' OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ings of the Craft was honoured, esteemed and respected 
by his fellow -brethren." 

This was a fitting memorial of the Craft in recognition 
of the great and eminent services rendered by Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji, to the Masonic Order, more especially 
as the pioneer of Freemasonry to the natives of Western 
India, which deserved commemoration, and subscriptions 
were invited by a Special Committee consisting of Brother 
Morland and others appointed for the purpose from all 
the daughter lodges for the purpose of defraying the cost 
of the portrait. The lodge joined in and contributed to 
the memorial fund but being of opinion that a letter 
memorial than that was desirable it suggested to the 
Grand Lodge that in addition to a portrait such a Scholar- 
ship prize or medal in connection with the Alexandra 
Native Girls' Institution in that Brother's name should be 
established as the funds to be subscribed for by all the 
lodges under the auspices of the Grand Lodge would 
permit in view of the connection he had with that Insti- 
tution. Members also individually subscribed to the fund. 
Brother Maneckji Cursetji then gave a sitting and his 
portrait was presented subsequently at a Grand Lodge 
Convocation and hung in the Masonic Hall. 

Brother K. R. Cama had brought forward a scheme for 
life-membership on payment of a sum of Rupees six 
hundred invested in Government Paper yielding 4 per cent, 
and a proposition was brought forward providing for 
same and that the sum so secured should be kept intact, 
the income only being used for the current expenses of 
the lodge. An amendment increasing the amount to 
Rupees one thousand two hundred was also brought 
forward by Brother D. R. Chichgar but was not seconded. 

Brother Cama's view was that by a member paying a 
lump sum in composition of his monthly dues he would 
continue a member till his death and would not be induced 
a,t any time to resign or be eompalleci to do so in case of 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 221 

distress or bad circumstances, while at the same time the 
lodge funds would acquire a permanency and continue to 
receive an income even after the member's death. But 
the proposition was not passed. 

The lodge had by this time subscribed Rupees four 
hundred to the Scottish Benevolent Fund; being Rupees 
two hundred in its own name and Rupees hundred in the 
name of Brother K. R. Cama and Rupees hundred in the 
name of Brother Murzban and had become entitled to 
claim life-membership of the fund for itself and the two 
worthy Past Masters. The amounts of Rupees hundred 
each were not, however, allowed up to now to be credited 
in the names of Brothers Cama and Murzban but were 
credited in the name of the lodge. This was due to a 
misreading of the rule of this fund but at this time the 
point was cleared and the amounts were credited in the 
names of the said two Brothers and they became life- 
members of the fund in addition to the lodge being 
entitled also to a membership, and out of the other sum 
of Rupees two hundred a moiety was transferred into the 
name of Brother D. R. Chichgar, who also thus became a 
life-member and in order to entitle all the three brethren 
to sit on the Benevolent Fund Committee the lodge also 
agreed to pay annually the sum of Rupees eighteen out of 
the Charity Funds, being ten per cent, of their annual 
subscriptions on their behalf in accordance with the rules 
of that fund. 

This year the lodge embarked into an inquiry into the 
unmasonic conduct of a mason who at one time was a 
member. It arose out of the libel case in which Brother 
M. C. Lungrana alias Munsookh was at that time con- 
victed by the local Presidency Magistrate's Court of 
having defamed Brother K. N. Kabraji and a member of 
his family in a vile manner in his newspaper The Satya 
Mitra. Brother H. M. Chichgar laid a formal charge 
in writing and signed by him in the following terms; 



222 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

11 That Brother Muncherji Cowasji Langrana, a former 
member of this lodge residing in the City of Bombay 
having, on the 4th day of July 1882, been convicted in 
due course of law of an offence under the Indian Penal 
Code, namely of having defamed Brother Kaikhosru N. 
Kabraji, the Honarary Organist of this lodge, and his 
family, I Hormusji Muncherji Chichgar, Immediate Past 
Master of this lodge, do upon the complaint of the said 
Brother Kaikhosru N. Kabraji, charge the said Brother 
Muncherji Cowasji Langrana with the commission of the 
said offence, the same being conduct unbecoming and 
unworthy of a Mason, and I claim that the said Brother 
Muncherji Cowasji Langrana may be tried and punished 
on the said charge according to law, As Witness my hand 
this second day of September 1882. " 

The indictment was then read in open lodge and 
Brother Hormusji cited several masonic authorities to 
show that a Mason though not a subscribing member of 
any lodge at the time of his masonic trial for a masonic 
offence could still be tried and punished by the lodge with- 
in whose geographical jurisdiction he resided, for he being 
once a Mason, always remained subject to the government 
of the Order and also masonic duties and obligations 
save those relating to lodge organisations and that the 
relation being one of a child to its parent, could never be 
dissolved except by an expulsion which was recognised as 
a masonic death and that a Mason whether affiliated or 
not could even after having undergone the penalty of 
the laws of his country be still tried by a lodge for the 
same offence and punished a second time. The autho- 
rities quoted were Paton's Jurisprudence, pp. 160, 342-3, 
345-6 and 349 and Mackay's Jurisprudence, pp. 269 and 
507 and the ancient installation charges in the time 
of King James II, and the regulations of the Order 
expr:ssly prohibiting a Mason from snowing a want of 
courtesy or kindness to the brethren, speaking calum- 



OF WESTERN INDIA A r o. 342 S.C. 223 

niously of one behind his back, or in any other way 
attempting to injure him or doing any dishonour to the 
wife, daughter or sister of his Brother. The Lodge then 
unanimously decided to accept the charges as laid, and 
that the accused should be brought to trial. 

The charges were then communicated by Brother 
Secretary to Brother Langrana by a letter which also 
called upon him to attend the lodge and answer the 
complaint at the lodge meeting at which it was to be 
inquired into, and the summons convening that meeting 
was also sent to the offending Brother and service of 
both the letter and summons was formally proved at 
that meeting. It was also shown that the regular time 
was allowed between the service of the charges and the 
time of trial. The summons was disobeyed so far as 
attendance was concerned, but a written statement was 
sent which was read to the lodge with copies of the 
Satya Mitra newspaper of the 10th and 17th September 
1882, and a copy of the Magistrate's finding. In the 
written statement the accused demurred to the right of 
the lodge to try him and in the same breath defended 
himself by attempting to justify the libel, which he 
argued could be done before a masonic tribunal though 
he could not do it before a Court of Justice and further 
blamed the lodge for not taking any notice of certain 
attacks Brother Kabraji had made in his paper, the 
Rast Goftar, against him for some years past. The two 
newspapers and the Magistrate's finding were submitted 
in proof of two extenuating circumstances, namely, (1) 
that his Counsel had to leave in the middle of the case 
as he was made Advocate-General and (2) that certain 
witnesses for the prosecution were not cross-examined 
as he and his Counsel were under the belief that the case 
would be sent up to the High Court for trial. 

Bro. Kabraji refuted the extenuating circumstances 
and the Magistrate's finding corroborated him, and the 



224 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAK 

lodge was of opinion that the explanation rendered was 
untruthful and if allowed would reflect on the Magis- 
trate who tried the case and on British justice as well. 
Issues were then formally framed and the trial was duly 
proceeded with and several brethren took part in it and 
in the end Brother Langrana was found by the lodge 
guilty of the charge laid against him and resolutions 
were passed unanimously for reprimanding him for his 
unbecoming and unworthy conduct as a Mason and a 
Brother and expressing profound sympathy with Brother 
Kabraji for all that he had suffered at the offending 
Brother's hands. 

The land question again came up this year, and the 
lodge unanimously passed the resolution which had been 
recommended by the Land Sub-committee, and a further 
resolution that a requisition in writing signed by the 
members of ihe lodge, as required by the Deed of Trust, 
be sent to the Trustees empowering them to sell the 
trust premises on such terms as to them might seem meet. 

The Scottish Masonic Hall project was also brought to 
a head. The Grand Lodge Sub-committee had prepared 
a report containing a scheme for the purchase for 
Rs. 42,500 of a bungalow at Clare Road, Byculla, by 
forming a Joint Stock Company to be called " The Framji 
Cowasji Freemasons' Hall Association, Ltd., " and the 
Grand Lodge had submitted this report to Lodge Rising 
Star and written a letter inquiring whether the lodge 
would like to have a Joint Masonic Hall together with 
the English Masons or a separate hall for them under the 
Scottish jurisdiction only, and the Hall Committee had 
also asked the lodge to choose a site for building a hall. 
While the matter was being considered by the lodge the 
Sub-committee's report arid the letter were both withdrawn 
by the Grand Lodge, 1 as in the meantime it appears the 
Sub-committee propounded another scheme for building a 
Freemasons' Hall at a cost of Rs. 60,000 on a plot of 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 31*2 S.C. 225 

ground on the Esplanade adjacent to what was then 
known as the racquet court, which Government were 
willing to sell at Rs. 20 per square yard, and the scheme, 
with some modifications as to the details, was accepted 
by the Freemasons' Hall Committee. This scheme was, 
however, not put through, as the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master and his immediate predecessor had found 
another suitable plot near the Young Men's Christian 
Association site admeasuring about 4,000 square yards 
at 6 annas per square yard, and that site was considered 
more suitable than the one near the racquet court, but 
it was decided by the Grand Lodge to build a joint Masonic 
Hall with the District Grand Lodge (E. C.) instead of 
erecting one for the Scottish bodies only. 

At a Grand Lodge Convocation, held on 22nd July 1882, 
the following two resolutions amongst others were pass- 
ed at the instance of Brother Morland, viz., "(1) That the 
District Grand Lodge under England and the Hall Com- 
mittee be informed that in terms of a resolution passed on 
the 29th October last the Grand Lodge desires to give effect 
to the intentions of the late Brother Nowroji Nanabhai 
Framji and to utilize to its best advantage his assign- 
ment of land towards the erection of a Masonic Hall, with 
which view the offer of a most desirable site on highly 
favourable terms has been obtained from Government 
and has been conditionally accepted; that it is hoped the 
building will be put in hand as soon as a reply to a 
reference which is about to be made to the masonic 
bodies of the Scottish Obedience is received; that although 
by the terms of the deed of gift the hall must necessari- 
ly belong to the Scottish Constitution this Grand Lodge 
trusts it will not prevent the bodies under the English 
Constitution meeting therein as at present, and that the 
arrangement will further promote the fraternal feelings 
which already exist between the brethren of the Craft 
under the two Constitutions. (2) That a special letter 

15 



226 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

be addressed to Lodge Rising Star, in the members of 
which lodge the disposal of the moneys expected to be 
derived from the sale of the land assigned for the erec- 
tion of a Masonic Hall for the Scottish Constitution rests, 
inviting its hearty co-operation in the undertaking which 
is so eminently suited to secure the wish of the donor, 
the late Nowroji Nanabhai Framji, and stating that it 
is proposed the hall should be named the Framji Cowasji 
Masonic Hall in consideration of the funds to be derived 
from the sale of the land being contributed towards the 
erection of the hall/' 

The resolutions were supported in the Grand Lodge by 
Brother K. R. Cama and the Worshipful Master and 
Brothers Murzban and D. R. Chichgar. 

Subsequently the lodge was requested to inform the 
Grand Lodge what amount it was prepared to invest in 
the building of the joint Masonic Hall out of its general 
and charity funds, and the matter having been considered 
Brother K. R. Cama gave notice of a motion in the 
following terms : 

" That Lodge Rising Star proposes to make a free gift! 
either of the land held in trust for it from the late 
Worshipful Brother Nowroji Nanabhai Framji or the 
proceeds of the sale thereof, if the same is in the mean- 
time sold to the Freemasons' Hall,' Committeef ( who have 
power from both the G. L. of A. S. F. I. and the District 
Grand Lodge of Bombay to frame a scheme for the 
erection of a joint Masonic Hall) for the purpose of 
Building a Masonic Hall to be for ever called by all the 
masonic bodies holding meetings therein, " The Framji 
Cowasji Masonic Hall " and that in order to carry out the 
intention of the donor and of this lodge in its integrity, 
this lodge should appoint two of its members to 
represent this lodge on the Joint Hall Committee or the 
Board of Trustees or such other body as may be hereafter 
appointed to manage and control the concerns of the Hall 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 5.C. 227 

who should have no right to vote save and except on 
matters relating to the subject of this resolution, and 
that in consequence of this free gift the Trustees of the 
proposed Masonic Hail should make suitable provision 
in the Deed of Trust for the purpose of giving full effect 
to this resolution/* 

1883. This proposition was the first thing taken up in 
the year 1883 and it was passed on 6th January along 
with another proposition which was then brought forward 
to meet the requirement of the Trust Deed, namely " That 
a requisition in terms of that proposition be obtained in 
writing from the majority of the members of the lodge 
in conformity with the conditions of the Trust Deed." 
The proposition was duly communicated to the Grand 
Lodge Sub-committee. The Joint Hall Committee there- 
after submitteed the hall scheme formulated by the Sub 
committee to * the lodge and desired ijo know to what 
extent the lodge would support the scheme financially 
and take up debentures proposed to be issued there- 
under. 

The Grand Sub-committee consisted of Brothers James 
W. Smith, K. R. Cama, J. P. Cornforth, J. R. Kirby 
Johnston, James Sinclair Pirie and D. R. Chichgar and 
in their report they (Brothers Cama and Chichgar 
dissenting) had inter alia expressed their opinion upon 
the proposition that had already been submitted to them 
that the Masonic Hall for Bombay should not bear the 
name of any Brother or individual whatever but should 
be called "The Bombay Masonic Hall" and that it was 
objectionable in principle to allow the donor of less 
than 1/9 of the total cost of the building (which it may 
be stated was estimated at about Rs. 95,000) to saddle 
it with any distinctive personal name and particularly 
with the name of a deceased gentleman who was not a 
Mason and further objected to two of the members of 
the lodge being appointed permanent members of the 



228 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Hall Committee and did not recommend that the proposi- 
tion submitted by the lodge should be accepted. 

The lodge considered the scheme and in due course 
signified to the Hall Committee their acceptance of it 
subject to certain stated modifications and intimated that 
the members would be prepared to subscribe debentures 
to the extent of Rs. 20,000 or thereabouts, subject to 
certain specified conditions, and in regard to the objections 
of the Sub-committee regarding the name to be given to 
the hall the Committee's attention was drawn to the re- 
solutions passed by the Grand Lodge on 22nd July 1882 
which initiated the proposal to give the name of "The 
Framji Cowasji Masonic Hall" and regarding the objec- 
tion to the appointment of two members permanently on 
the Hall Committee they reminded the Committee that such 
appointment had already been considered necessary by 
the Grand Lodge as appeared from the resolutions passed 
by them on 29th October 1881. At the same time the 
lodge intimated that it would be happy to consider any 
proposal which the Hall Committee might make to 
effectuate the same purpose. 

The land was also sold this year and the net sale proceeds 
were invested in Government of India Loan Notes in the 
names of the Trustees as required by the Trust Deed. 
Brother Hormusji M. Chichgar's firm of Messrs. Nanu 
& Hormusji had acted as the Solicitors for the Trustees 
without charging any costs and a cordial vote of tihanks 
was passed in recognition of their services in the matter. 
A suitable present to Brother Hormusji M.Chichgar was 
also proposed, but; that Brother, true to the best tradi- 
tions of his honourable profession as to the noblest prin- 
ciples of the masonic order, objected to it on the ground 
that he had a partner in the firm who was associated in 
the matter and a presentation would be unusual. 

In order to enable the lodge, if need be, to utilize a 
part of its funds in the building of the Masonic Hall, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 229 

Bye-law 68 was amended by providing for the investment 
of the funds also in and towards the building of a Masonic 
Hall, etc., with the consent of the Lodge in addition to 
the investments permitted by that Bye-law. 

The lodge contributed Rs 100 to the Scottish Masonic 
Benevolent Fund, this time honouring Brother Jehangir 
Gustadji who, according to the rules of that fund, became 
its life member and also entitled to vote on its Committee. 

The Grand Master, Brother Mackintosh Balfour (who 
was also an honorary member of the lodge) had resign- 
ed his exalted post at the end of the last year and Brother 
Morland again became the Grand Master. A fund was, 
upon his suggestion, inaugurated to defray the cost of a 
portrait of Brother Balfour for which he was, pursuant 
to a resolution passed by the Grand Lodge, requested to 
give a sitting, and the lodge subscribed to the fund and 
testified to the high esteem and affection in which it held 
that worthy Brother and to its appreciation of his many 
and valuable efforts for the promotion of the welfare 
of the Craft. 

A silver calabash with a suitable inscription was voted 
to Brother D. R. Chichgar as a memento of his zeal for 
the good of the lodge and his readiness to assist the bre- 
thren at all times, but was not presented, as that Brother 
declined tjo accept it considering that the confidence the 
lodge had in him was in itself a more than sufficient 
reward for what little he had done for the lodge and 
further that the presentation would be a drain on the 
General Funds of the Lodge which just then could not be 
spared for presentation purposes, and no doubt that was 
so, for the numerical strength of the lodge was decreas- 
ing, old members were resigning, new members were not 
coming in any large numbers and one-fourth of the 
subscriptions had to go to charity account and the 
remaining three-fourths was just sufficient to maintain 
the ordinary expenses of the lodge, and the brethren were 



230 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

seriously considering how to help the General Funds and 
in fact proposals were made and discussed for revising 
the allocation of the initiation and otiher fees and month- 
ly subscriptions which would have had the effect of cut- 
ting down to some extent the proportion set apart for 
charity, but even then the majority of the brethren did 
not like to touch the charity proportion and left it un- 
affected and tried to find out other ways and means for 
increasing the General Funds but happily the state of 
the finances again improved by the end of the year and 
it was found unnecessary to consider the matter 
further. 

Brother Cowasji Sorabji Patel who for nearly 40 years 
was the Treasurer of the Lodge resigned the Office owing 
to ill-health and the lodge in recognition of his long 
services voted him a gold watch as a memento of its 
appreciation thereof and regard for him. 

The Naoroze festival took place and the lodge joined 
in it this year also. 

Brother M. M. Bhownagree, who was at the time in 
England, was nominated Proxy Master to represent the 
lodge in the Grand Lodge of Scotland. 

For the first time, the Annual Certificate of the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland, was read and recorded at a lodge 
meeting certifying that the lodge had complied with the 
whole requisition of the Act of Parliament entitled " An 
Act for the More Effectual Suppression of Societies, 
established for Seditious and Treasonable Purposes, 
etc.," and also with the resolutions of the Grand Lodge of 
5th August 1799 and authorizing the lodge to exercise 
their whole powers and functions of Freemasons in terms 
of and conforming to, the Charter of Constitution and 
erection. 

An important presentation was made this year and 
for the second time in the history of the lodge to a 
member of the Blood Royal of England. It was of the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 231 

Fundator's Medal presented to H. R. H. the Duke of 
Connaught, K.G., Past Grand Warden of the United 
Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 
England. 

His Royal Highness accompanied by H. E. the Governor 
of Bombay, laid the foundation stone of the Pestanji 
Hormusji Cama Hospital for Women and Children. The 
ceremony was to be performed according to the ancient 
masonic rites and with masonic honours and two of the 
items in the printed programme of function were the 
presentation of the Worshipful Master of the Lodge by the 
M. W., the G. M. A. S. F. I. to His Royal Highness for 
the purpose of presenting him with the Burners Medal 
and the presentation. By some accident the masonic 
ceremonies were not performed and the medal was not 
presented in person- It was therefore subsequently 
forwarded to H. R. H. at Meerut, whither he had proceed- 
ed, with a letter from the Worshipful Master, and the 
presentation was duly acknowledged on behalf of H. R. 
H. by- Brother M. Fitzgerald of his stiaff by a letter 
conveying H. R. H.'s gracious acceptance and pleasure at 
receiving the mark of distinction. 

There was an addition of two new members, namely, 
Jehangir K. R. Cama (introduced by hrs venerable father) 
and Meherally Devraj Master and Brother Merwanji 
Bomanji Engineer rejoined, but on the whole, the numeri- 
cal strength at the end of the year was less than at the 
commencement thereof, for Brothers Sheriff Salemaho- 
med, F. R. Vivaji, Krishnaji Laxrnan and Hormusji Dada- 
bhai resigned, and Brothers Barton and C. F. Khory 
died, and Brother Waslekar's name was struck out for de- 
fault in payment of lodge dues. Brother Khory was the 
immediate Past Master, and a special funeral lodge was 
held in his memory at which resolutions were passed 
recording the regret of the lodge at his death and 
expressing sympathy with his widow and aged mother 



232 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

and for the lodge furniture and jewels being draped in 
mourning until the next regular meeting. This Brother 
was known for his truthfulness and independent spirit 
and was acknowledged to be a good Mason and true, and 
to his noble traits a fitting testimony was borne at the 
meeting by the Past Grand Master, Brother M. Balfour, 
who though then on the eve of his departure from India 
had at great inconvenience attended the funeral service. 
In place of the Past Master's jewel which had been 
voted before to the deceased Brother, the lodge made a 
contribution to a fund which was got up by his friends 
and admirers to perpetuate his memory. 

The minutes show that the Worshipful Substitute Master, 
Brother R. M. Chichgar, had presided at many of the 
meetings during this year owing to the absence of the 
Worshipful Master on account of illness and other causes, 
and given entire satisfaction to the brethren, who rightly 
rewarded his zeai and ability by electing him to the chair 
for the following year. 



CHAPTER XXVI. 



18&4. This Brother's regime was- marked by 
peace and prosperity. The finances were in a more 
flourishing condition than before and in the roil- of 
members there was a pretty large and desirable acces- 
sion. -.. 

Brothers Hormusji. Dadabhai Kabraji- and E. S. 
Jussawalla rejoined. Khan Saheb Ratanji Edulji-Kanga, 
Dr. Hormusji Nusserwanji. -Seevai --and -Manecksha 
Jehangirsha Talyarkhan were- initiated, while Brothers 
Ratansha, Dadabhai, Shapurji Sorabji, Khodabax -Sherr 
mahomed, Hormusji Nusserwanji Vakil, Rehmubhai 
Allana, Mulji Jivraj and Sorabji Dadabhai Dubash 
were affiliated. Two members resigned, viz., Brothers 
Temulji Dhanjibhoy Engineer and Pestanji Dajibhai 
Unwalla and two were removed by death, viz., Brothers 
Balfour, an honorary Member of the Lodge and Cowasji 
Sorabji Patel. Tyler for more than one_ third of a 
century. 

Resolutions were passed recording -the .regret of .the 
brethren at these deaths and condoling with their families, 
and a funeral service at a special meeting was also held 
in memory of the deceased Brother Tyler. There were 
three initiations and an equal number of. passings and 
raisings during the year.. 

The Naoroze festival was celebrated as in former 
years and the lodge participated in it. 

Worshipful Brother M. M. Bhownugree was again 
appointed Proxy Master to represent the ledge in the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland, 

20 



234 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The lodge subscribed Rs. 200/ to the Scottish Bene- 
volent Fund and Brothers Jamsetji D. Wadia and H. M. 
Ohichgar were nominated life members thereof. 

Worshipful Brother Nowroji Furdoonji was voted a 
Past Master's jewel. He, however, while accepting it 
presented a Government Loan Note for Rs. 500 / as a 
donation to the lodge charity funds with a request that the 
interest thereon only should be applied for charitable 
purposes. 

Among the office-bearers for the year was Brother 
Shripad B. Thakur as Gita-bearer. 

A Brother named Charles B. Leonard Gunner of H. M's. 
S. S. "Dragon" presented to the lodge His Royal Highness 
the Prince of Wales* plumes in carved brass gilt and 
silvered which were thankfully received. 

It was resolved to procure a new die of the Fundator's 
medal at an outlay of about Rs. 400 / as the original die 
was missing. 

The affiliation fee was this year raised from Us. 10 to 
Rs. 25 /. From November of this year the lodge removed 
from the Nesbit Lane Bungalow and began to assemble 
at "Buntley Lodge", Clare Road, Byculla, in pursuance of 
an arrangement made by the Freemasons' Hall Commit- 
tee for the assembling of all bodies there. 

Brother D. R. Chichgar had during this year acted as 
Grand Secretary for some months during the absence of 
that office-bearer in England. Brother D. R. Chichgar was 
at this time Honorary Substitute Grand Master while 
Brothers Manekji Cursetji and K. R. Cama were already 
Honarary Depute Grand Masters. Brother Murzban was 
this year created also an Honorary Depute Grand Member, 
in recognition of his labours in Freemasonry which were 
deemed considerable and always of great advantage tu 
the Grand Lodge. 



CHAPTER XXVII. 

1885. Worshipful Brother R. M. Chichgar was re- 
elected Master for the year 1885,, There was not much work 
done for there was only one initiation and one raising, 
but lectures were delivered, two of them being by the 
Right Worshipful Master on " Masonic Symbols, Lodge 
Room, and Apron" and " Admission of Brethren in 
Lodges " and one by Brother N R. Chichgar on the 
" Antiquity of Brotherhood." 

The raising was of Brother Fakirji Dinsha, a child of 
Lodge Perseverance, who had already received his two 
degrees in that lodge snd was conferred the 3rd degree 
at the request of the Worshipful Master of that lodge 
for the reason that that lodge had no time to confer that 
degree on him, and at its installation meeting which was 
to come off very shortly the Master-elect was anxious 
to appoint Brother Fakirji as one of his office-bearers 
and before being appointed Brother Fakirji had to be a 
Master Mason. Later in the year this Brother was 
affiliated to the lodge. 

Besides Brother Fakirji Dinsha 's there was one more 
affiliation and for the first time from Lodge Islam 
No. 587 S. C., namely of Brother Haji Ismail Hassam. 

Mr. Burjorji Dinsha Lam was the only member initiated. 
Right Worshipful Brother General W. Mullaby of the 
British Army was honoured with the distinction of an 
honorary member. He was then Depute Grand Master of 
All Scottish Freemasonry in India and had previously 
been in charge of the Grand Lodge on two oce isions 
when the Grand Master Brother Morland was away 



236 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

in England and Australia, and was a keen and enthu- 
siastic mason of 37 years' standing and it is recorded 
that in recommending the proposition for electing that 
distinguished Brother as an honorary member, Brother K. 
R. Cama, cited him as a Mason who had set an example, 
worthy of imitation, of earnestness and zeal for Masonry 
by attending all the way from Mhow, hundreds of miles 
away from Bombay, to discharge his duties as Grand 
S nior Warden while he occupied that post at the Con- 
vocations in Bombay of the Grand -Lodge of which he 
had been a member for about 10 years by never keeping 
away while others more favorably situated would keep 
away on slight excuses. It was after a lapse of 7 years 
that an honorary membership was conferred this year 
and on such an illustrious Mason, and he personally ex- 
pressed to the brethren at a lodge meeting that he valued 
the exceptional honour beyond any other, done as it was, 
by the lodge which was specially honoured among native 
lodges. 

Worshipful Brother Dadabhai Nowroji was at this 
time in Bombay and attended some of the lodge meetings 
and was specially welcomed, and promised to attend 
whenever he could find time 1o do so. At a meeting held 
on 7th November a resolution was passed congratulating 
him in very flattering terms on his elevation to a seat 
on the Legislative Council of the Governor of Bombay. 
It appears that the lodge never missed an occasion when- 
ever it got one of expressing its special gratification and 
pleasure at this worthy Brother's presence at the meetings 
he attended and congratulating him on the events in his 
public life. 

But while the lodge rejoiced at the accession of members 
and their continued connect ion it equally grieved on losing 
them, specially by death, and the losses this year In that 
direction wero such as the lodge could ill afford. Brothers 
C. N. Cama and Nowroji Fnrdonji died, the former at 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 237 

the commencement and the latter about the end of the 
year. 

Brother Cama was an unostentatious man and mason 
of many sided activities, who thought rightly and acted 
well and wisely and was not deterred from a determina- 
tion to do good either by opposing prejudice or crude 
ignorance but always threw his heart and soul in every 
good undertaking and lent his helping hand in every 
cause of public benevolence, charity and utility imbued 
with a strong sense of duty and the righteousness of his 
own action. He had rendered himself particularly useful 
in educational matters and reforms and considered himself 
quite happy in assisting in their development, acting on 
the true masonic principle of rendering oneself extensively 
serviceable to his fellow-creatures and having always 
present to his mind a state of reward and punishment 
in after life according to the deeds done in the flesh 
inculcated by the declaration subscribed to by every 
Mason on admission into the Order. 

A funeral lodge was held in his memory which wa-, 
very largely attended, and after t'he service was concluded 
Worshipful Brother Dadabhai Nowroji, who had been early 
associated with him, chiefly in connection with the 
establishment of the Girls' Schools by the Student's Lit- 
erary and Scientific Society under the Alexandra Native 
Girls' Institution, read a splendid oration (which has been 
recorded as a part of the minutes) in which he forcibly 
depicted the character of the deceased Brother by 
enumerating at great length the many valuable services 
rendered by him to several public and charitable institu- 
tions and gave a very elaborate and historical sketch of 
his public deeds and actions as well as an accurate 
delineation of his private life, giving instances illustrative 
of his wide intelligence, catholic sympathies and his 
courage never to submit or yield, but 'Mike the Knight 
not to look round him but win the treasure/' He also in 



238 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

that oration paid a high tribute to the worthy departed 
Mason's "enthusiasm to labour in a good cause, his wise 
counsels, well considered views, and independence. 

Resolutions were passed recording in feeling terms the 
sorrow of the lodge at the death of the worthy Brother 
and condoling with his widow and family, including his 
son Brother J. C. Cama who was then already a member 
of the lodge, and some teLling speeches were delivered 
in which references were made with general approbation 
to the unstinted and ungrudging services rendered to 
the lodge by the deceased during his long connection 
of 28 years, for the greater part of which he had filled 
with credit and honour the post of Treasurer. He had 
latterly been Substitute Master and but for his diffidence 
in addressing the brethren in English, would have also 
passed the Chair. A resolution was also passed that the 
furniture and jewels of the lodge be draped in mourning 
till the next regular monthly meeting. A memorial fund 
for perpetuating the memory of the deceased was also got 
up between the members of the lodge. 

Brother Nowroji Furdoonji was the Immediate Past 
Master and an active and zealous member of the lodge 
and was also Substitute Grand Master at the time of his 
death. The Most Worshipful the Grand Master had 
issued a circular the next day after his death to all the 
lodges of his obedience announcing the death and ex- 
pressing profound grief at the loss of one " who \vas a 
faithful and zealous member of the Craft, whose memory 
was entitled to be honoured as that of all men who live 
honestly and honourably and do the duties of life and of 
their station zealously and faithfully, not for gain or 
profit, not for reward, honour or emolument, but because 
they are duties in this world, and by whose removal the 
pillars of the Grand Lodge were shaken. ' " The circular 
also intimated that the obsequies due to the exalted rank 
in Freemasonry of the deceased Brother would in due 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 239 

course be arranged for and directed that in the meantime 
the altars and working tools of the lodges under the 
Scottish sway throughout India, including Aden and 
Ceylon should be draped inb lack and the brethren should 
wear the proper badges of mourning for 60 days." 

In consequence of the circular the lodge did not hold a 
funeral service in memory of the deceased Brother which 
it otherwise would have done, but contented itself with 
passing resolutions at a regular meeting deeply deploring 
the death of that eminent Brother and sympathising with 
his widow in her great bereavement. The Grand Master 
was present at this meeting and in a pathetic address 
eulogised the several good qualities of the departed 
Brother which had, he said, so attracted him that he was 
induced to appoint him to the high and enviable position 
of Substitute Grand Master. A cordial vote of thanks 
was passed to the Grand Master expressive of the sense 
of the gratitude of the lodge for his spontaneously under- 
taking tu hold the funeral service in the Grand Lodge 
and thereby doing honour to a Brother who was much 
loved and admired b,y the citizens in general, amongst 
whom he was known as the Tribune of the People; and 
the masonic fraternity in particular. 

The Grand Lodge subsequently held a funeral lodge in 
remembrance of our deceased and much lamented Brother 
which was very numerously attended. 

Two members resigned, namely, Brothers M. B. Engineer 
and Hormusji Shapurji. Brother D. R. Chichgar proceed- 
ed to Europe in May of this year but before his departure 
the Joint Hall Committee voted a sum of Rs. 250 in aid 
of a fiund for presenting a testimonial to him in recogni- 
tion of the services rendered by him as Secretary to the 
Committee, and a Sub-committee was formed of Brothers 
Barrow, K.R. Cama and J. M. Cursetji to collect subscrip- 
tions. The lodge contributed Rs. 100 towards the fund 
and members individually? also subscribed about Rs. 130 



240 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

thus testifying to their sense of appreciation of that 
Brother's work. A banquet was also given to him which 
was largely attended by members of several lodges who 
also contributed their mite to the testimonial fund. 

This year also the lodge contributed as usual Rs. 100 
to the Scottish Benevolent Fund, associating the name of 
Brother R. M. Chichgar as life-member thereof. A Past 
Master's jewel was voted to Brother R. M. Chichgar, 
who during his two years' regime, had proved himself by 
common consent quite worthy of the chair. 

The Naoroze festival was celebrated thio year under 
the mangement of the lodge. 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 

1886 Brother Manekshaw D. Doctor succeeded Brother 
R. M. Chichgar in the government of the lodge and held 
the reins as lightly and creditably as his illustrious 
predecessors had done. Though engaged in a service, the 
exigencies of which demanded his attention at all times of 
the day or night, he was almost always found at his post 
and did good work. In his time there were one initiation, 
3 passings and 3 raisings and some spare time was uti- 
lised by his delivering a discourse on the "Antiquity and 
Universality of Masonry/* One new member was initiat- 
ed, namely, Mr. Pestanji Cowasji (Solicitor). Three bre- 
thren were affiliated, viz., Brothers Ardesir Cowasji 
Homji, Nowroji Pestanji Vakil 'now C. I. E.) and Dr. K. R. 
Kirtikar, and Brother D. Murray Lyon, the Grand Secre- 
tary of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, was made an hono- 
rary member in recognition of the very eminent and 
valuable services rendered by him to Freemasonry in 
general and as a token of the appreciation of the lodge of 
the marked attention he had paid to those of its members 
who had the opportunity of visiting the Grand Lodge of 
Scotland. Brother Bhownugree who had now returned 
from England and was present at the first meeting held in 
the year certified from personal knowledge derived by his 
contact with that worthy Brother and his attendances 
in the Grand Lodge of Scotland to the fact that Brother 
Lyon was taking a deep interest in and paying great 
attention to the affairs and welfare of the lodge. 

Brother D. R. Chichgar had also returned from 
England and was present at the regular meeting 

X6 



242 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

held in March and reported to the lodge that he had been 
very warmly and heartily received in the Grand Lodge 
of Scotland which he had the honour to visit during his 
sojourn in Edinburgh and that by a special resolution a 
high privilege had been conferred on him by the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master Mason of Scotland, Brother 
Sir Archibald Campbell of Blythwood, Baronet, namely, 
that of wearing the fundator's medal, within a wreath of 
roses and thistles emblematic of England and Scotland. 
The lodge thereupon passed a resolution recording its 
great gratification at the cordial reception of Brother 
D. Ri Chichgar and the particular mark of favour con- 
ferred on him by a special ordinance to denote the interest 
which Brother D. R. Chichgar had taken in both the 
Constitutions as the Honorary Secretary of the Joint 
Freemasons' Hall Committee, and also, its sense of the 
high honour done to it by that body and also resolved that 
the Worshipful Master be requested to forward a copy 
of the resolution engrossed on parchment to the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master Mason of Scotland. 
. Brother James Gibbs died this year, and a vote of con- 
dolence was recorded on account of his death and a re- 
solution was passed sympathizing with his widow in her 
heavy bereavement. Brother Jehangir Gustadji also died 
this year, and in memory of the latter a special funeral 
^lodge was held at which resolutions were passed deeply 
I lamenting his death and condoling with his son Mr. 
.Manekji J. Gustadji and for draping the furniture and 
jewels of the lodge in mourning for one month. This 
departed Brother was a very amiable, useful, z ealous and 
faithful member of the lodge and had made himself very 
popular during the 25 years that he was a subscribing 
member and his place was filled next year by his son. 
<rv The names of Brothers Sorabji Shapurji Bengalee, C. I. 
E., and Pestanji Hormusji Cama, C. I. E., were this year 
translated into the honoured list of honorary members. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 243 

Brother Bengalee had then made the noble gift of a build- 
ing costing about Rs. 67,000 in perpetuity to the Girls' 
School Association for the purpose of providing a per- 
manent home for the Fort School of the said Association, 
and thereby crowned the disinterested services which he 
had through a series of years unostentatiously rendered to 
the cause of female education and social progress in the 
City of Bombay, and had exemplified in a marked degree 
the true principles of Freemasonry and upheld the honour 
of the Craft. Brother P. H. Cama was a man and mason 
of large-hearted benevolence and had proved himself true 
to the best traditions and excellent precepts of Freema- 
sonry by his munificent gift of nearly two lacs of Rupees 
for a Hospital for Women and Children, the foundation 
stone of which was laid at the close of the year 1883 by 
H. R. H. the Duke of Connaught, and endowing scholar- 
ships in aid of female education, and thereby giving 
practical illustrations of the fundamental lessons of that 
cardinal virtue in Freemasonry, viz., all possible relief to 
the poor and distressed. Both the brethren were by 
general acclamation deemed quite worthy of the distinc- 
tion conferred on them 

Brother Dr. James Cranstoum, Grand Bard and Pro- 
fessor in the Royal High School of Edinburgh, was now 
appointed Proxy Master to represent the lodge in the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland. 

The Naoroze festival was celebrated this year also. 

An inventory of the property of the lodge was taken in 
June of this year, and it included the portraits of H. R. H. 
the Prince of Wales, Brothers Maneckji Cursetji, and 
M. C. Murzban, and H. R. H. the Prince of Wales ' feathers. 

A Past Master's jewel was voted at the installation meet- 
ing to Brother M. D. Doctor, and Rs. 100 were voted to the 
Scottish Benevolent Fund associating his name therewith. 



CHAPTER XXIX. 



1887. Brother Nanabhai R. Chichgar was the Worshipful 
Master in the year 1887. Three new members joined the 
lodge, being one initiate and two affiliates. The initiate was 
Mr. Manekji Jehangir Gustadji, the son of the late Brother 
Jehangir Gustadji whose death the lodge mourned only 
the preceding year, and the affiliates were Brothers Currim- 
bhoy Ibrahim and Fazulbhai Visram. Brother Currimbhai 
Ibrahim was an acquisition and to this day has been a sub- 
scribing member of the lodge. It was not in his own self 
that he added to the strength of the lodge numerically and 
otherwise but also in the introduction in the years follow- 
ing of his five worthy sons one after the other, and by his 
benefactions which in later years recived due applause and 
recognition from the lodge, he has shown himself a good 
Mason and true, faithful to the tenets of our excellent 
Order and ever anxious to practise them in their broad 
teachings. 

This year also the Naoroze festival was held, the lodge 
taking part in it. 

This was the year of the Golden Jubille of Her late 
Majesty Queen Victoria, when she assumed the title of 
Empress of India, and the Grand Master A. S. F. I.,Brother 
Henry Morland, who was at the time the President of the 
Municipal Corporation of Bombay, was honoured with a 
Knighthood by the august Sovereign. A masonic banquet 
was given to him by the Scottish Fraternity under the 
auspices of the Grand Lodge and the superintendence of 
an Entertainment Committee, which included Brothers 
K. R. Cama and D. R. Chichgar as two of its members. The 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 245 

brethren joined in the banquet to do honour to their worthy 
chief and the lodge also passed a special vote of congratula- 
tion which was conveyed to him in a letter. 

H. R. H. the Duke of Connaught who was now the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the Forces in India, was on the 12th 
of November 1887 installed as District Grand Master of 
Bombay and its territories. The lodge had the honour of 
being represented on the occassion and Brother Fakir ji 
Dinshaw was the Director of Ceremonies on behalf of the 
lodge in the ceremonial of Investiture. 

All the recipients of charitable contributions from the 
lodge had this year the benefit of a free supply of tea 
from Brother Manekji Hormusji Maju, a member whose 
generous offer to do so was thankfully accepted by the 
lodge and duly recorded in the minutes. 

Brother Maneckji Cursetji had passed through a very 
serious illness and at one time a rumour had gone abroad 
that he had died, which happilly had proved to be false; for 
the worthy Brother was present thereafter at a Regular 
meeting of the Lodge held on 2nd April, 1887, and was ac- 
corded a special welcome by the brethren, and in thanking 
them for their solicitude and kindness for him he assured 
them of his readiness to do what lay in his power to further 
the interests of Freemasonry. But this was not to be, for 
Divine Providence had disposed otherwise. This meeting 
of 2nd April, 1887, proved to be the last meeting at which 
the enlivening influence and pleasant intercourse of that 
Worthy Brother were to be experienced, for within a short 
time he left this earthly tabernacle and his soul took wings 
to, the Sublunary Abode and the Grand Lodge above to 
seek rest and peace in etiernity, after a brilliant and use- 
ful masonic carreer of 43 years, dating from 1843, when 
this lodge saw the light through his exertions. The Bro- 
ther's death having taken place before the Installation 
Meeting; that meeting was postponed until next year, and 
the lodge went into mourning. The Grand Ledge of All 



246 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STA& 

Scottish Freemasonry in India went also into mourning 
with all its daughter-lodges and the District Grand 
Lodge was also pleased to pay a like, compliment to his 
memory. Brother Maneckji Cursetji was still at the time 
of his death Honorary Depute Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India. 

A lodge of sorrow was held by the lodge in his memory 
on 7th January 1888 at which the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master of All Scottish P'reemasonry in India with 
about 30 members of the Grand Lodge was presenb in 
addition to a very distinguished and representative 
congregation of about two hundred Masons, comprising 
Europeans, Parsis, Hindus and Mahomedans. After the 
funeral service was performed Brother M. M. Bhownugree 
delivered an oration which concisely yet very prominently 
recounted the early laudable and successful efforts of 
the lamented Brother in opening the portals of Free- 
masonry to his countrymen in Western India with great 
perseverance and unselfishness and with 'a fearless and 
couragoaus spirit and against the opposition made by 
some of the leading Europeans of the time against 
fraternising with natives and in the face of contempt 
and ridicule of members of his own community who in 
those early times did not view the Masonic Order any 
way favourably. It also paid a fitting tribute to the scru- 
pulous and strict scrutiny which the deceased Brother al- 
ways made and enforced into the qualifications and eligibi- 
lity of a candidate and the generous spirit with which he 
helped the lodge for nearly 20 years of its early career 
and through its vicissitudes both in point of members and 
funds and above all his strict fidelity to the lodge. By 
the death of this Brother, whose aims, as tested by time and 
circumstances, were solid and benevolent and on whom 
honours had fallen thick and fast and who had won, and 
most deservedly, the love and esteem of Masons both Scotch 
and English alike who knew him then by the familiarly 



OP WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 247 

patriarchal name of the Father and Founder of Masonry 
among the people of Western India this lodge lost one of 
its strongest pillars and objects of pride. The lodge re- 
corded resolutions mourning his loss and condoling with 
Brother K. R. Cama (the deceased's son-in-law) and 
Brother J. M Cursetji and Mr. C. M. Cursetji (his sons) 
and also for raising a Fund by subscriptions to perpetuate 
his memory in some permanent form to be thereafter 
determined. 

The brethren also resolved that they should always drink 
to his memory in solemn silence whenever they should meet 
at the festive board. 

The deceased was the first native gentleman appointed 
by Government to fill the post of the Sheriff of Bombay 
and also the first Indian Member of the Royal Asiatic 
Society. 



CHAPTER XXX. 

1888. The Installation Meeting which had to be post- 
poned was under a dispensation, held on 23rd February 
1888. Brother M. M. Bhownugree, C.I.E. (who was by 
this time Past Grand Steward of the Grand Lodge of 
Scotland) was installed into the Eastern Chair and the 
occasion was one which will be long remembered and look- 
ed upon with feelings of utmost pride and gratification by 
the lodge, for it was graced by the presence of His Royal 
Highness the Duke of Connaught, K.G., District Grand 
Master of Bombay and its territories, who had been 
pleased to honour the lodge by a special attendance with 
his District Grand Lodge Officers. This was the first 
visit of His Royal Highness to a Native lodge and 
special preparations were made to receive him. The 
Most Worshipful the Grand Master of All Scottish 
Freemasonry in India also paid an official visit with his 
Grand Lodge Officers and His Royal Highness was receiv- 
ed by a deputation of the Grand Lodge Officers and 
introduced into the lodge by Brother Hormusji DadabhaL 
The Worshipful Master Brother N. R. Chichgar accorded 
His Royal Highness a fitting and cordial welcome on 
behalf of the lodge both as a Brother Mason occupying 
the most exalted Office in the sister Constitution and as a 
son of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria, whose 
name was a household word throughout the British Empire, 
and thanked His Royal Highness for the high honour done 
by him and hoped that he would while in this part of the 
country condescend to honour them with visits in the 
future, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 249 

The lodge at that very meeting elected His Royal 
Highness an honorary member by acclamation and the 
distinction was very graciously accepted and in honour of 
the occasion the lodge subscribed Rs. 200,- being double 
its customary donation, to the Scottish Benevolent Fund 
(associating this time the names of Brothers Rustomji 
Merwanji Patel and N. R. Chichgar). 

The august Duke was pleased |to say a few words in 
praise of the excellent working of the lodge and to con- 
gratulate it on the prosperous condition of its Charity 
Funds. 

It was also at this meeting that a portrait of Brother 
Dr. Burnes, presented by Mr. C. M. Cursetji, a son of the 
late Brother Manekji Cursetji, was thankfully received, 
and a resolution was passed for putting a suitable inscrip- 
tion thereto and requesting the Hall Committee to allow 
it to be hung in the Hall- 

This year two other distinguished Masons were also 
elected honorary members, namely, Right Worshipful Bro- 
ther Sir William Clarke, Baronet, then District Grand 
Master of England and Provincial Grand Master of Scot- 
land and Ireland at Melbourne, and Right Worshipful 
Brother Dr. Jullins Wilmot, M.D., Past Grand Deacon 
of the English Constitution and Past District Grand 
Senior Warden of Victoria. These brethren had shown 
great courtesy to Brother D. R. Chichgar and received him 
very kindly in their Grand Lodge while he was at MeJ- 
borne about three months before this and had also elected 
him an honorary member of the Grand Lodge, and Brother 
Sir William Clarke had further presented to him a jewel 
as a token of esteem and brotherly love evinced by him 
during his sojourn in that distant part of the country. 
All this was personally testified to and reported by Bro- 
ther D. R. Chichgar on his return at a meeting held on 
2nd June, when he also informed the lodge that the jewel 
presented to him was the second of its kind presented by 



250 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the Grand Master of England to a member of the Craft ; 
the first being one, then recently presented to the Earl of 
Carnarvon. The courtesy and honour were duly recipro- 
cated, as they deserved to be, by these two brethren be- 
ing borne on the list of honorary members. 

Besides the two distinguished honorary members, there 
were six affiliates and one initiate. The affiliates 
were Brothers Framji Dinsha Petit, Hormusji Dossabhai 
Cama, Dorab Jamsetji Tata (since created a knight), Gor- 
dhandas Khatau Makanji, C. N. Pavri and Narayen 
Ganesh Chandavarkar (also since created a Knight and 
a Judge of the High Court of Bombay) while the solitary 
initiate was Mr. Ardesir Framji Bahadur ji. Brother B. 
D. Lam was the only member who resigned. 

The Naoroze festival took place also this year and the 
members of the lodge participated in it. 

A Past Master's jewel was voted to Brother N. R. 
Chichgar. 

A lecture was delivered by Brother Rustom K. R. 
Cama on " The End and Objects of Freemasonry." 

In regard to charity funds it was this year resolved that 
so long as they continued in their then state, a sum not ex- 
ceeding Rs. 50/ per mensem should be expended in -stipends 
and that no monthly stipend should exceed Rs. 5/. 

A question had arisen as to whether a ballot taken for 
a candidate at a regular meeting before confirming the 
minutes of a previous regular meeting was valid, for this 
had happened in the case of the gentleman initiated this 
year. Brother Secretary contended that it was irregular, 
being against; masonic usage and custom and therefore 
illegal, and brought forward a proposition to that -effect, 
which, however, on a division was lost, Subsequently it 
appears the Grand Lodge published a ruling by the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland on the subject of the reading of the 
minutes at lodge meetings which laid down that at all 
stated meetings of a lodge before transacting any business 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 251 

it was necessary that the minutes of previous meetings 
must be first read and confirmed. To this ruling the Grand 
Master had appended his opinion that if through an extra- 
ordinary accident the previous minutes could not be read 
and confirmed the brethren would not grudge attending to 
work. This ruling on its coming to the notice of the lodge, 
was considered somewhat doubtful and if left unmodified, 
difficult of operation, even to the extent of obstructing 
smooth and efficient working of lodges. A representation 
was therefore submitted by the lodge to the Most Wor- 
shipful the Grand Master conveying certain objections 
and requesting him to solicit reconsideration of the ruling 
in question by the Grand Lodge of Scotland. As to what 
transpired after this, does not appear, for the minutes do 
not contain any further reference to the subject. A 
system of duplicating the higher offices in the Grand 
Dodge was introduced about this time with the object 
of meeting cases of inconvenience and emergency and 
Brother K. R. Cama was accordingly nominated one of the 
two Grand Masters Depute and Brother D. R. Ghichgar 
one of the two Substitute Grand Masters. 

The lodge took part in the Jamshed Naoroze festival 
held on March 21st under the management of Lodge Cyrus. 
Prayers and Hymns and a " Discourse on Brotherly Love 
and Charity " by Brother S. V. Bhandarkar followed 
by an entertainment constituted the programme. The 
entertainment consisted of native songs and an " Explan- 
ation of the Structure of the Human Eye with Diagrams 
and Microscopic Specimens," by Brother Dr. Prabhakar. 

The Freemasons' Hall question again came, up for dis- 
cussion this year. The opposition which the Grand 
Sub-committee had at first made to the Hall being named 
after Mr- Framji Cowasji had, it appears, to some extent- 
been withdrawn and it had of its own motion subse- 
quently recommended that the Banqueting Hall should, 
be called the Framji Cowasji Banqueting Hall. The 



252 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

whole building it was thought would cost about one Lac 
of Rupees. The subject was freely discussed at an emer- 
gent meeting, and the papers relating to the moneys held 
in trust by the lodge were referred to the Standing 
Committee with full powers to deal with the question of 
disposing of the funds. The lodge also appointed the 
Worshipful Master and Brothers Hormusji Dadabhoy, 
Temulji B. Nariman, M. J. Talyarkhan and Currimbhai 
Ibrahim as delegates representing it as required by the 
Hall Committee and subscribed Rupees 2,0001 worth of 
debentures out of the Charity Funds and individual 
members also subscribed debentures to a large amount. 

The Standing Committee on a full consideration of the 
subject of the disposal of the trust-funds were of 
opinion that no ; action could be taken until the lodge was 
advised by Counsel as to the legality or otherwise of 
the proposed application thereof for the purposes of the 
H&ll and recommended that Counsel's opinion should be 
taken in the matter. 

1889. The Retiring Master was re-elected to fill the 
chair for another year. The prosperity of the last year 
did not however attend his renewed rule. Only two new 
members were admitted, namely, Dr. B. S. Shroff and 
Mr. Jafferbhai Ludha Chatoo, but three resigned, namely, 
Brothers Sorabji D. Dubash, Rehemoobha Allana and 
Hormusji D. Cama, while death robbed the lodge of three 
more, namely Brothers H. F. Cooper, S. B. Turkhud and 
C. N. Pavri, Brother Cooper had during his membership 
of 22 years filled various Offices and was holding the post 
of Secretary at his death and a special funeral lodge was 
held in his memory at which resolutions were passed 
recording the sorrow of the lodge at his death and the 
heavy loss sustained by it, as the deceased Brother had by 
his zealous conduct, unostentatious and simple manner, 
his heart for work and great punctuality and constant 
attendance to masonic duties, proved himself to be an ex- 



OF WKSTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 253 

amplary member of the Order and had won the love and 
esteem of all alike. The lodge also passed resolutions 
condoling with the family of the deceased and went into 
mourning for one month. Brother Turkhud followed Bro- 
ther Cooper within two months to seek the same eternal 
rest. He had been a member for a little over 15 years, 
during which period he had endeared himself to the bre- 
thren by his literary and other achievements and genial 
manners and showed himself to be every inch a good man 
and Mason. In his memory also a special funeral service 
was held at which Brother Kirtikar delivered an oration 
in which he splendidly recounted that Brother's attain- 
ments, literary, masonic, and otherwise, referring to his 
knowledge of 14 different languages of the East and West, 
and portrayed him as a Brother whom it was better to 
have loved and lost than not loved or known at all, meek 
and humble, never boastful of what he knew, never jealous 
of a rival or afraid of being beaten and great in his 
honour and integrity, his truthfulness, and a high and con- 
trolling sense of duty. 

The oration contained also a sonnet by Brother Kirti- 
kar to the memory of the late lamented Brother. 

Other speakers also supported the estimate given by 
Brother Kirtikar in neat little speeches, feelingly expres- 
sive of the Brother's high genuine and noble masonic 
qualities and the lodge passed resolutions recording the 
irreparable loss sustained by his death and condoling 
with his mother and widow and for going into mourning 
for a month. 

Within 5 months again the lodge had to mourn the loss 
of Brother C. N- Pavri, whom the same fate overtook. 
His death took place at the close of the year and a special 
funeral service in his memory was held in the next year 
and resolutions were passed recording the regret of the 
lodge and sympathising with his family. He was, it is re- 
corded, a picture of modesty and pre-eminently a man of 



254 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

whom one could truly say that he was throughout his life 
unostentatious and had performed his duties well with an 
unswerving devotion to Freemasonry. 

To add to the loss of the lodge, Brother Rustom K- 
R. Cama had sent in his resignation but at the desire 
of Brother D. R. Chichgar the consideration of it was 
deferred and ultimately it was not pressed and to this day 
this amiable and energetic Brother has in his wisdom and 
unerring fidelity stuck on with credit to himself and ad- 
vantage to the lodge. 

The Grand Lodge otf Scotland had now held against the 
holding in duplicate of the higher Offices in the Grand 
Lodge Qf All Scottish Freemasonry in India and therefore 
Brother J.W. Smith, who was Depute Grand Master with 
Brother K. R. Cama and Brother D. R. Chichgar, who 
was one of the Substitute Grand Masters, resigned their 
respective Offices- Brother K. R. Cama was reinstalled 
as Depute Grand Master and Brother Chichgar was 
nominated Honorary Depute Grand Master. 

Brother K. R. Cama's was the first instance of a 
Native of India being solely appointed ta perform the 
duties of the high office of Depute Grand Master and the 
lodge felt just pride, in seeing one of its most esteemed 
Past Masters so honoured by the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master and specially recorded the election with 
acclamation in the form of a letter and handed same over 
to Brother Cama besides congratulating him in open 
ladge on the merited distinction. The Brethren felt no 
less grateful to the Most Worshipful the Grand Master 
for his recognition in such a marked degree of Brother 
Cama's labours in the cause of Masonry and the honour 
done thereby to the lodge. 

His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught was at the 
Grand Lodge festival of this year (which was held on 2nd 
December to suit his convenience and to allow of his long- 
iooked-for visit to be paid) made an Honorary Past 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3J>2 S.C. 255 

Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, and 
his patent of appointment as such was presented to him 
thereat by the Most Worshipful the Grand Master. To 
commemorate this auspicious event, Brother Framji 
Dinsha Petit (who was at this time Grand Treasurer ) 
made a handsome donation of Rs. 1,500/ in Government, 
Paper to the Scottish Benevolent Fund. 

The lodge made the usual contribution of Rs. 100/ this 
year to the Scottish Benevolent Fund. 

The funds were in a very healthy state, amounting to 
Rs. 1.398-1-10, in General Account and Rs. 5,226-11-0 
in Charity Account, and the number of subscribing mem- 
bers on the roll at the end of the year was 43. 

The portrait of Brother Brunes received from 
Mr. C. M. Cursetji last year was handed over to Brother 
D. R. Chichgar for being hung in the Masonic Hall. 

A Past Master's jewel was voted to Brother Bhow- 
nugree. 



CHAPTER XXXI. 



1890. In the year 1890, the lodge was ruled by Brother 
K. N. Kabraji. It again sustained a heavy loss, Brother 
Cursetji Maneckji Sett, who was the Treasurer for 8 
years, had, owing to continued ill-health, resigned his office 
at the close of the preceding year and his meritorious 
services were fittingly recognised by a resolution record- 
ing the deep sense of gratitude, thanks and esteem of 
the lodge for the marked ability, unremitting care and 
anxious solicitude with which he had husbanded the 
resources and otherwise managed and controlled the 
disbursements of the funds and expressing a sincere 
hope for that Brother's recovery. But this hope was not 
realised, for within a very short time, Brother Sett 
obeyed the imperial mandate of death the dread messen- 
ger against whose free entrance within the circle of 
masonic fraternity the barred doors or Tyler's weapon 
can offer no impediment. The lodge held a special 
funeral service in memory of the beloved Brother and 
passed resolutions deploring his death, condoling with 
his family and for going into mourning for one month 
and for draping the furniture and jewels in mourning 
during that period. Save this loss by death and the, 
resignations of Brothers Pest'anji M. Nicholson, Hor- 
mussji Dossabhai Cama and Nanabhai R. Chichgar, the 
year passed oif well. Six new members were admitted, 
being one affiliate, namely Brother Dr. Ismail Janma- 
homed, and five initiates, namely, Messrs. Dinsha Ardesir 
Talyarkhan (Municipal Commissioner, Baroda), Dhanji- 
shaw Hormusji Karaka (Assistant Political Agent, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 257 

Kathiawar), Haji Mahomed Mehdi Malik-o-Tojjar 

(Ex-Governor of Bushire) and Mahomedbhai Currim- 
bhai Ibhrahim and Haji Mirza Abbas (merchants). 

The proceedings of the meetings at which Brother 
Malik-o-Tojjar re2ieved his three degrees were interpre- 
ted to him in Persian, owing to his imperfect knowledge 
of the English language. 

Brother Malik-o-Tojjar presented to the lodge on the 
day that he was raisad the sum of Rs. 500/ as a donation 
to the charity funds which was thankfully accepted and 
it was resolved that the amount should be invested in 
Government paper and held as an endowment from 
Brother Malik-o-Tojjar. 

Brother H. M. Chichgar presented the sum of one rupee 
to the charity funds of the lodge and Brother Bhownugree 
made a gift of Rs. 500/ to the lodge on account of the 
intimate and kindly feelings which had marked his 
relations with the Worshipul Master Brother K. N. 
Kabraji since they both had been initiated into the 
mysteries of Freemasonry and also on account of the 
prosperity which the lodge had attained during Brother 
Kabraji's stewardship. This gift was associated with the 
name of Brother Bhownugraa's deceased sister, Miss 
Avabai M. Bhownugree, and upon condition that the 
income thereof only should be usai for charitable 
purposes. 

Brother Fakirji Dinsha presented to the lodge a por- 
trait of Brother M. C. Murzban which the lodge received 
with thanks and an assurance that it would most carefully 
preserve it, 

Brother K. R. Cama was now about to vacate the 
honourable post of Depute Grand Master and there was a 
general desire to comni3morate his services to Free- 
masonry and Brother D. R. Chichgar brought forward a 
proposition for voting a sum of Rs. 50/ for a portrait of 
that Brother to be hung in the Freemasons' Hall. The 

17 



258 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Sir Henry Morland, 
who was present at the meeting at which the proposal 
was made as an honorary member of the lodge, said 
that several other lodges and Masons shared in the desire 
to get up a token to Brother Cama in recognition of 
the eminent services ardently and faithfully rendered by 
him to the cause of Freemasonry in India and that it 
would be but fair that they should be allowed to 
subscribe to the portrait. This suggestion was accepted 
and the proposition passed. Brother Cama, who was 
present, said he felt greatly honoured by the resolution^ 
all the more so, because it was an unexpected mark of 
good feeling shown to him by the lodge. 

A farewell entertainment in the form of a conversazione, 
attended by Masons of both Constitutions and also non- 
Masons of both sexes, was held at the Secretariat on 7th 
March 1890 in honour of His Royal Highness the Duke of 
Connaught, the District Grand Master, on his leaving the 
shores of India, and the lodge, though it was in mourning 
at that time, took part in that function to do honour to 
that illustrious personage, 

Among the recipients of charity this year was a Brother 
named Bomanji Hormusji, belonging to Lodge Alexander 
of New South Wales, Australia, who had fallen on evil 
days and was helped with a sum required for setting him 
up in his business of a Photographer. 

A Past Master's jewel was voted to Brother Kabraji, 
and the usual contribution of Rs. 100/ to the Scottish 
Benevolent Fund was made at the installation meeting 
associating his name therewith. 

1891. Brother Dr. Temulji B. Nariman (now a mem- 
ber of His Excellency the Governor's Legislative Council) 
succeeded Brother Kabraji and kept up the high state of 
efficiency in which the lodge had until then been main- 
tained. He, like his predecessors, did not rest content with 
the customary work of conferring degress only, but', 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 259 

himself gave lectures and imparted instruction to the 
brethren and peace and happiness prevailed throughout 
his rule. The degree work consisted of three initiations, 
one passing and one raising. Four new members were 
added to the ranks, namely, Brother Gordhandas Goculdas 
Tejpal, affiliated from Lodge Perseverance, and Messrs. 
Pestanji Maneckji Kanga (Solicitor), Phiroze Cursetji 
Rustomji Sethna and Phirozsha Nusserwanji Pleader 
(Solicitor) of whom the latter three have since continued 
to belong to the lodge and have worthily passed into the 
list of Past Masters. But Brother Sethna's entry was a 
little marred by the death, very soon thereafter, of his 
father, Brother Cursetji Rustomji Sethna. Brothers Now- 
roji M. Contractor or Purvez and Jamsetji Dhanjibhai 
Wadia resigned during the year, while Brother Jehangir 
K. R. Cama who had resigned in 1886 when he went to 
Europe, rejoined the lodge this year. 

The Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Sir Henry 
Morland died on or about the 27th July 1891, some four 
days after he had resigned his exalted office owing to ill 
health; and by his death the lodge lost one of itssincerest 
friends after an unbroken connection of twenty-two 
years, during which period he had, besides paying his 
official visits during the tenure of his office, attended 
numerous meetings as an honorary member and 
honoured the brethren with his genial company at the 
banqueting board. The lodge went into mourning till 
the then next St. Andrew's Day and at its meeting held 
on 1st August (at which all business previously notified 
on the summons was adjourned) it passed a resolution 
recording with the profoundest sorrow "the deep sense 
of the loss sustained by Freemasonry in general and 
this lodga in particular on account of the sudden and 
untimely death of the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, one ofi the 
strongest, most zealous and devoted supporters and 



260 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

brightest ornaments of the Craft, who during his long 
and memorable connection with it exerted himself to the 
.best of his power to spread its principles and diffuse the 
blessings especially coming to natives of this country, who 
worked with unerring fidelity to maintain its high charac- 
ter and dignity, whom this lodge had always been proud to 
acknowledge as one of its best friends, and whose lasting 
and valuable services rendered to it will always be che- 
rished with the most sincere gratitude by its members.'* 
In seconding this resolution which was in fitting terms 
proposed by Brother T. B. Nariman, Brother K. R. Gama, 
as the oldest member of the lodge said," It was Sir Henry 
who had first put him in the way of becoming useful as a 
Mason and had encouraged him by appointing him to an 
office under him in the Grand Lodge. The speaker had 
constant opportunities of finding that Sir Henry Morland's 
heart was always in Masonry. He w r orked for it with 
some intermissions for twenty-eight years and although at 
times he felt weary, he never spared himself in promoting 
the interest of the Craft. During his regime, Freemasonry 
flourished so highly that Jie had now lodges in almost 
every part of India. He was so popular that he never 
came into conflict with any of the lodges under him. He 
took very particular interssst in this lodge and often 
spoke of it as No 1 Lodge." 

The lodge also passed resolutions condoling with Lady 
Morland and her children and also the Grand Lodge of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India. 

The resolutions, together with the proceedings of the 
evening were, as further resolved by the lodge, duly com- 
municated to the Grand Secretary for being placed at 
the funeral service which was then to be held and was 
subsequently held on 2nd August by the Grand Lodge in 
memory of the deceased. A memorial fund was also 
raised under the auspices of the Grand Lodge and this 
lodge subscribe Rs. 100 thereto, on condition that it 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 261 

should be applied towards perpetuating the memory of the 
deceased Brother. 

Sir Henry had very much interested himself in the 
Joint Masonic Hall question, but the project was not put 
through whilst he was alive- The Government had declin- 
ed to give the site near the Young Men's Christian 
Association premises for which negotiations had been for 
some time carried on by Sir Henry, except upon such 
terms as it gave Government lands to public bodies, and 
expressed its inability to make any concessions to the 
two Grand Lodges. The Hall Committee had another 
scheme now and that was to buy a bungalow at Grant 
Road, known as the Nawab of Bella's bungalow, and in 
view of that scheme and in order to be able to know how 
far that could be put through, they had addressed a letter 
to the lodge inquiring whether it would make a free 
gift of the Nowroji Nanabhoy Trust Funds which then 
amounted to about Rs. 12,000. The question of these 
funds was then discussed and it was resolved that as the 
subject was one involving certain legal aspects which 
required careful consideration, opinion of some Counsel 
should be taken and the funds should not be disposed 
of until after Counsel was consulted and as he might 
advise. Brother H. M. Chichgar, who had all along taken 
a very keen interest in the matter, volunteered to obtain 
the opinion of Mr. Farran, then a leader of the Bombay 
Bar, who later on became a Puisne Judge and then the 
Chief Justice of the High Court of Bombay. 

Brother H. M. Chichgar was now Senior Grand Ward- 
en and Brother Rustom M. Chichgar, Assistant Grand 
Secretary. 

Upon Brother Morland's resignation, Brother J. W, 
Smith was nominated to the High Office of Grand Master 
by the Grand Lodge of Scotland. He had, it may be 
said, the strong recommendation of his immediate pre- 
decessor and the common consent of all the lodges under 



262 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the Scottish banner to the appointment which he so well 
merited, and he was duly installed in Office at a quarterly 
communication of the Grand Lodge held on 23rd January 
1892 by Brother K. R. Gama, as Past Grand Master 
Depute. 

1892. Brother T. B. Nariman had so much won the 
esteem and good opinion of the brethren by his steady 
and energetic conduct of affairs during the year, that he 
was re-elected the Master for the next year and he 
maintained his previous good record. 

Brothers J. J. Guzder (Barrister-at-Law) and Shapur 
N. Bhedwar were affiliated and Mr. Fazulbhai Meherally 
Chinai was initiated while Brothers G. K. Makanji, 
G. G. Tejpal and B. F. Lalee resigned during the year. 
The degree work consisted of one initiation, three 
passings and four raisings. 

It was in this year that Worshipful Brother Dadabhai 
Nowroji was elected a Member of Parliament. He was the 
first native of India who secured a seat from the consti- 
tuency of Finsbury in that august assembly the doors of 
which until then were taken as locked to Indians, and the 
lodge unanimously voted an address to him which was 
duly transmitted to England expressing its great joy at 
the event which marked a new era in the history of India. 

Brother Meherally Devraj Master was known to be ever 
ready at a moment's notice to serve in any office in the 
absence of the incumbent or in any case of any emergency 
and had by his services so willingly and always efficiently 
rendered, merited recognition which at the installation 
meeting held on 15th December 1892 was marked by a 
special unanimous vote of thanks. 

Brother D. R. Chichgar was this year appointed to the 
high office of Grand Master Depute. Rs. 100 were again 
this year voted to the Scottish Benevolent Fund in the 
name of Brother Nariman, who was also voted a Past 
Master's jewel and apron. 



OF WESTER INDIA No- 342 S.C. 263 

1893. Brother Rustom K. R. Cama succeeded Brother 
Nariman and it fell to his enviable lot to be the 
Worshipful Master who before retiring celebrated the 
50 years' jubilee of the lodge. 

This was the Jubilee year and the Jubilee Meeting was 
held on 15th December. Brother Cama's rule, except 
for two events, namely, the deaths of Brothers Pestanji 
Hormusji Cama, C- I. E., and Sorabji Shapurji Bengalee, 
C. I. E., was marked by happiness and prosperity. 

Brothers Cama and Bengalee were at their deaths 
honorary members of the lodge and in their memory 
special funeral lodges were held. 

Brother Cama was the uncle of Right Worshipful 
Brother K. R. Cama and had been initiated by him, and his 
joining the lodge had brought several well-known and 
influential memters and greatly added to the prestige of 
the lodge. He was a zealous Mason and attended all 
regular meetings and also instruction meetings which in 
the early days were held as a regular institution and for 
holding which he had laid at the disposal of the members 
his own residence at Mazagaon. He took peculiar delight 
in succouring the needy and distressed and in dispensing, 
unknown and hidden from popular gaze, charities in a 
catholic spirit and in every way was true to and practised 
the excellent precepts of our ancient Order. For his pub- 
lic benevolence and great masonic worth he was made an 
honorary member of the lodge, but this honour he en joyed 
for only a few years. The funeral service was attended 
by a very larga gathering of the lodges working in 
Bombay under both the Scotch and English Constitutions 
and resolutions were passed recording the grief of the 
lodge at his death and condoling with his famly. His son 
Brother Nowroji Pestanji Cama presented to the lodge, 
which thankfully accepted it, a sum of Rs. 500/ in 
Government Paper to commemorate his memory, to be 
credited for charitable purposes in an account to be 



264 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

entitled "Brother Pestanji Hormusji Cama Charity Fund 
endowed by his son Brother Nowroji Pestanji Cama." 

Within three months, Brother Bengalee followed Bro- 
ther Cama to the eternal mansions on high, leaving 
behind his mark as a public spirited citizsn of known 
fame and popularity. The most eloquent testimony to his 
worth was furnished b'y the immense gathering that 
mustered unusually strong to pay its last res pacts at the 
time of his funeral and extended from his residence in 
Parsi Bazar Street (not far from the Bai Bhikhaji Girls* 
School which he had then but only a few years ago 
endowed) right up to the premises of Messrs. Kemp 
& Co. and by his full size statue in marbls raised by 
public subscriptions which now adorns one of the most 
prominent sites in Bombay near the Bandstand and the 
Government Secretariat building. 

A special funeral lodge was held in his memory by the 
lodge, which was numerously attended by members of the 
fraternity under both jurisdictions, including the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India and his officers. The ceremony was performed in 
the customary way, after which Brother K. R. Cama 
delivered an oration in which he gave a short sketch of 
the life of the deceased, holding up his example as one 
worthy of imitation, and resolutions were passed 
expressive of the deep grief of the lodge at the loss 
sustained by it and sympathizing with his family in their 
affliction. 

The lodge also unanimously resolved that out of the 
charity funds a sum of Rs. 1,000 should be set apart to 
form an endowment fund hearing the name of the 
deceased Brother. 

Brothers Chandavarkar, J. J. Guzder and Haji Ismail 
Hassam, resigned. But the decrease in the numerical 
strength caused by deaths and resignations was almost 
counterbalanced by the admisson of three new members, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 265 

namely, Messrs. Abdulla Meherally Dharamsi, Gulamhus- 
sein AULana and Dr. Framji Jivanji Patel, L.R.C.P., Den- 
tist, of whom the first named two have died since, and the 
last named has continued as a subscribing member till 
this day. 

The banner of the lodge having been out of order it 
was resolved that it should be refitted. 

The Right Honourable Lord Saltoum who was then 
Substitute Grand Master of Scotland and four years later 
succeeded to the exalted throne of Grand Master Mason 
of Scotland, was in Bombay, and honoured the Grand 
Lodge of India of All Scottish Freemasonry in India with 
a visit on 6th April 1893, and on that occassion a deputa- 
tion from Lodge Rising Star on the invitation of the 
Grand Lodge had the proud privilege of meeting His 
Lordship, and to commemorate the visit, Brother Framji 
Dinsha Petit made a hand some donation of Rupees three 
hundred to the funds of the Scottish Masonic Benevolent 
Association in India. 

Three initiations, two passings and two raisings consti- 
tuted the degree work done during the year. 

The Jamshedi Naoroze festival was held on 21st March 
under the auspices of Lodges Rising Star, Rising Sun, 
Eastern Star, Cyrus, Islam and Aryan and under the 
management of Rising Star, at the Masonic Hall. The 
programme included the usual prayers and hymns and a 
'Discourse on the Poetry of the Craft" by Right Worship- 
ful Brother P. N. Wadia, and an entertainment which 
comprised a farce entitled "A Sudden Arrival 5 ' and a 
comedietta " Marriage by Telephone." With the object 
of making the festival as attractive and popular as 
possible the Committee had invited ladies to the banquet 
and entertainment and a very large number of them, both 
European and Native, had responded to the invitations, 
thus lending additional eclat to the entertainment by 
their presence. Brother Phiroze C. Sethna played an 
24 



266 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

important character in "The Sudden Arrival/' He was 
" Cornelius Cocker" (an elderly gentleman with a 
partiality for zoological investigations) and Brother 
J. K. R. Cama had the role of " Marmaduke Twist" (his 
nephew, with an inclination for convivial association). 
In the comedietta Brother J. K. R. Cama was " Edward 
Honeysuckle." 

As was customary, the lodge bore a deficit which this 
year amounted to about Rupees ninety-six, as it had the 
management of the festival. 

The Jubilee of the lodge was celebrated with great eclat 
on 15th December 1893, in the Freemasons ' Masonic Hall 
the extensive compound of which was transformed into a 
gaily decorated and extensively illuminated shamiana, 
the whole of the grounds being carpeted with rich Brussel 
carpets and the ground floor rooms being converted into 
a luxurious drawing-room with any amount of floral 
decorations and the walls being covered with masonic 
devices woven in flowers and evergreens and the words 
" Jubilee of Lodge Rising Star " were emblazonei in 
flowers on a piece of red cloth which served as a screen in 
front of the main gate. 

Brother Framji Dinsha Petit was installed at the 
meeting held on the same day in the presence of a large 
gathering of the members of the Fraternity under the 
Scotch and English constitutions!, including the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master of All Scottish Freemason- 
ry in India and representatives of the District Grand 
Lodge. 

To commemorate the occassion a printed short sketch 
of the historry of the foundation of the lodge prepared 
by the Secretary, Brother P. M. Kanga, and the Senior 
Deacon, Brother P. C. Sethna, was circulated amongst the 
members previous to the holding of the meeting, and 
Brother K. R. Cama, in addition gave at the meeting an 
account of the foundation of the lodge. Here this Worthy 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 267 

Brother redeemed in a way the pledge he had given in 
1862 to compile a short history. The account is recorded 
in the minutes and the printed history is also pasted 
therein. They both give the history, from 15th December 
1843 to 1845, and the printed sketch also contains 
" Prater's letter" and Dr. George Oliver's letter already 
referred to in the previous portion of this history. 
They both, however, while they are in other respects 
substantially accurate, except in small details, are deficient 
in that they do not at all refer to the first refusal of old 
Lodge Perseverance when under the English banner to 
admit natives into the Order and their unwillingness to 
receive Brother Manekji Cursetji, and start only with the 
matter as it assumed shape after that Brother's return to 
Bombay from the Continent, a full-pledged Mason, when 
he was again refused admission as a joining member. 
Printed leaflets of the said sketch were sent to the Most 
Worshipfuil the Grand Master Mason of Scotland, the 
Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, and 
Lodges Perseverance, Islam, Caledonia, Zoaroaster, etc. 

In further commemoration of the event the lodge resolv- 
ed to revive the Founder's or Burne's medal and to 
strike a new medal to be called the Jubilee Medal and 
bearing the effigy of Broth 9r Framji Dinshaw Petit and 
to present same to that Brother to mark the occasion of 
his being installed into King Solomon's Chair on the 
occasion of the Jubiles and to evince the regard of the 
lodge for the great Z3al shown by him in the cause of 
Freemasonry in ganeral and of masonic charities in 
particular- It was resolved that Brother Secretary, Bro- 
ther P. M. Kanga, should during the next year compile a 
history of the lodge from its foundation up to the Jubilee 
Day. 

Following its past traditions and with the object of 
honouring deserving Masons of good repute and standing 
on such an important occasion and to lend it further 



268 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

celebrity, the lodge enrolled as honorary members 
Right Worshipful Brothers the Honorable Mr. (now Sir) 
Pherozsha M. Mehta and the Honourable Mr. W. L. 
Harvey, I.C. S. ; C.I. E., Worshipful Brothers Jehangir 
Manekji Cursetji and W. H. Barrow, and Brothers A. F. 
Moos, Dossabhai Framji Karaka, C.S.I., Rahimtulla Ma- 
homed Sayani and Dr, Atmaram Pandurang. 

With the exceptions of Brothers Barrow, Harvey and 
J. M. Cursetji, the other brethren were previously 
members of the lodge who one and all, especially 
Brother P. M. Mehta, had done much to maintain anJ 
advance its status and prestige Brother Karaka made a 
donation of Rupees fifty to the Charity Funds of the 
Lodge which was gratefully received in tjie following year. 

Brother Harvey was at this time the Worshipful Master 
of Lodge Perseverance and his election was attended with 
special interest as it was made with a special object. 
Brother K. R. Cama in the account that he gave of the 
history of the lodge, after recounting in brief the help 
of the members of Lodge Perseverance in establishing 
the Lodge in 1843 and the fellowship and good will and 
brotherly love that had throughout the long period of 
half a century marked on the whole the relations between 
these two sister lodges, each of which felt its happiness 
incomplete without contributing to that of the other, said 
that on the occasion of the Jubilee celebration festival 
th3 lodge had considered it fit and proper that it should 
recognise its oligations to Lodge Perseverance for giving 
it a start fifty years ago by electing its Worshipful 
Master as an honorary member. 

Brother Rustom K. R. Cama as the Worshipful Master 
of the lodge, wrote a letter to Brother Harvey communi- 
cating the election ( which was made on 2nd December) 
and. it evoked a more than hearty response from that dis- 
tinguished and Worthy Brother and from his lodge. At 
a meeting held on 12th December, Lodge Perseverance by 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 269 

acclamation passed a resolution That a letter of 
congratulation be addressed to Lodge Rising Star on the 
occasion of its attaining its Jubilee/' and this resolution 
was (on the 14th December) conveyed to Brother R. K. R. 
Cama by Brother Harvey in a letter ( which was read at 
the meeting and recorded in its minutes ) in which after 
referring to it and to the close connection between the 
lodges and the privileges of extra-membership which they 
had recognised for ssveral years and the temporary 
estrangement which had at one time existed, but had long 
since be^n consigned to oblivion, he wrote : 

1 The present members of Lodge Perseverance have 
every reason to rejoice in the action of their predecessors 
of fifty years ago in signing the requisition for the founda- 
tion of Lodge Rising Star as it has been fully justified by 
the successful career of a lodge that has given Scottish 
Freemasonry in India some of its most distinguished 
members and has ever maintained the high principles 
which actuated its founders, and they have no less reason 
to rejoice in the fact that after fifty years of existence* 
during which both lodges have experienced many vicissi- 
tudes, the friendship and brotherly love which bound them 
in their infancy still unite them in the years of their 
maturity." The letter concluded with the heartiest 
congratulations and most cordial good wishes from Lodge 
Perseverance which indeed were highly appreciated. 

Brother Barrow was then the Depute District Grand 
Master, English Constitution, in charge of the District and 
had distinguished himself in the masonic world and had 
established so great a claim on the English Constitution 
by his valuable and unstinted labours and services that 
the District Grand Master, His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Connaught, had, it is said, resolved to make him a 
permanent fixture in his high office. He had also always 
taken a keen interest in the welfare of the lodge and more 
than merited the honorary membership. 



270 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Brother J. M. Cursetji, then Past Master of Lodge East- 
ern Star No. 1189, English Constitution, was conferred 
the distinction with the object of preserving the connection 
of his father Brother Manekji Cursetji 's name with 
the lodge. 

To mark its deep sense of the gratitude it owed to 
Brothers Dr. Burnes and Manekji Cursetji and to carry 
out its pious desire to preserve their names in their books 
for ever, the lodge also passed a resolution for transferring 
a sum of Rs. 2,500 out of the available Charity Funds to be 
transferred to an account to be opened in their names 
with a proviso that in case of emergency, the principal 
amount might itself be utilized whenever deemed neces- 
sary. That amount was subsequently transferred and 
still stands in these two brethren's names and it is hoped 
will for ever so continue so as to keep evergreen the 
memory of those two departed souls. Brother Manekji 
Cursetji was not spared by Providence to be present at 
the Jubilee celebration, but the brethren, not unmindful of 
the necessity of his form in any shape being before them 
had obtained his bust from his son Mr. C. M. Cursetji as a 
loan for the occasion and exhibited it very prominently. 

A contribution of Rs- 500 from the Charity Funds :n 
addition to the sum previously voted by the lodge was 
made on this occasion to the Morland Memorial Fund, to 
further mark the senss of esteem in which the late Grand 
Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India was held, 
and the names of Brothers M. C. Murzban, R, M. Patel, 
Hormusji Dadabhai, Maneksha D. Doctor, and Rustom 
K. R. Cama were associated therewith, as Life Governors 
of the fund. 

A Past Master's jewel was voted to Brother Rustom 
K. R. Cama, and he no doubt most richly deserved it, for 
the records show that he governed the lodge not only well 
and wisely, under tthe watchful eye and careful guidance 
of; his venerable father, though he, contrary to the usual 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 271 

order of things exacted and was entitled to obedience, 
but left the lodge better than it was, when he assumed 
charge financially and otherwise- 
Two donations were announced and thankfully accepted 
at the Jubilee Meeting of Rs- 2,500 each to the Charity 
Funds of t ( he Lodge ; one from Brother F. D- Petitl in 
commemoration of his being installed into the Eastern 
Chair on the Jubilee Day, and the other from his esteemed 
and venerable father, Sir Dinshaw Manekji Petit, Baronet, 
(now of happy memory), in commemoration of the Jubilee. 
These donations have since formed two of the Endowment 
Funds of the Lodge, bearing one the name of Brother F. D. 
Petit and the other that of his father, and the income 
only of same has been and is being devoted towards the 
education of children of deceased and indigent Free- 
masons and the support of, poor and distressed people 
according to the conditions laid down by the generous 
donors. These were indeed munificent gifts, and in the 
case of the father clearly showed that he was really a 
Mason at heart though he had never entered the Order. 

Congratulations by letters and telegrams were received 
not only from local masonic bodies and brethren, but also 
from lodges and brethren from distant parts of the coun- 
try such as Ahemedabad, Secunderabad, Dondegal, Mhow, 
Kirkee, Poona, Indore, Surat, Lanowli, Belgaum, Kurrachee 
and other places. A letter from Brother J. H. Solomon, 
Past Master and Secretary of The King Solomon Lodge 
No. 29 of the United Grand Lodge of Victoria, Melbourne, 
was also read at the meeting. It conveyed an unanimous 
resolution passed by that lodge at their regular monthly 
meeting held on 1st November 1893, in the following terms; 
"That a hearty vote of thanks be recorded in the minute 
book of the lodge and also be forwarded to the Lodge 
Rising Star of Western India, No- 342, of Scottish Constitu- 
tion for the many acts of welcome extended by it to Past 
Master Brother J. Marks and Brother B. Marks, members 



272 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

of the lodge, during their stay in Bombay whilst touring 
round the world. " 

A special feature of the evening was again the pre- 
sence of Worshipful Brother Dadabhai Nowroji, M.P. 
Brother K. R. Cama in the course of the history that he 
narrated had made special mention of this Brother whom 
he thrice welcomed to his mother-lodge and said that a 
man of his determination and courage as shown by the 
public movements of the time in which he took a promi- 
nent part, was sure to have rendered vast services to 
Masonry, but that unfortunately however for Masonry in 
general and this lodge in particular, but happily for 
himself and his countrymen, he had a Mission to leave 
India for England just at the time when he was pitch- 
forked into the Secretaryship of the lodge, soon after his 
being made a Master Mason, that while there he joined 
Lodge Dalhousie and became its first native Master, and 
thereafter became an active member of a couple of lodges 
in Finsbury (which to the gratification of the teeming 
millions of India returned him to the British Parliament, 
to enter which seems to have been an ambition of his life) 
always keeping his interest in the Craft up to date. 
Brother K. R, Cama's concluding words were : " In closing 
let me as my last words send up a fervent prayer to the 
Great Architect of the Universe that some of our younger 
members present here to-night may be granted long life 
to, enable them to join the celebration of the century of 
this lodge on 15th December 1943-" Let it be hoped that 
that prayer will he granted by the Most High. 

Thus closed the memorable Jubilee evening with sixty- 
three subscribing members on the roll and several dis- 
tinguished honorary members, of whom any lodge may be 
proud, and funds amounting to nearly Rs. 9,000. 

Printed pamphlets of the history of tho foundation of 
the lodge were in due course sent to the Most Worshipful 
the Grand Master Mason of Scotland, Sir Charles Dal- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C- 273 

rymple, Bart-, and Right Worshipful Brother the Right 
Honourable Lord Satton, the Grand Lodge of Scotland, the 
Most Worshipful the Grand Master of All Scottish Free- 
masonry in India, and the Grand Lodge of All Scottish 
Freemasonry in India, and Lodges Perseverance, Islam, 
Rising Sun, Caledonia, Cyrus, Eastern Star, Aryan, 
Truth, Zoroaster, and other lodges, who one and all 
suitably acknowledged the same. The Most Worshipful 
the Grand Master Mason of Scotland was graciously 
pleased to indite an acknowledgment to the Worshipful 
Master as follows : 

" New Hailes, Marlborough, E. N. 

Scotland. 

February 8th, 1894. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I have to thank you for so kindly sending me copies 
of the history of your Lodge Rising Star of Western 
India and I shall read with much interest what has been 
written on the subject, 

I shall take care that the other copies besides that 
which I shall keep for myself are sent to Grand Lodge. 
I think it very kind of you to send me this notice of 
the fiftieth anniversary of your lodge and I beg to ex- 
press for myself and for the Grand Lodge of Scotland 
our sincere congratulations on this occasion and our beat- 
hopes for the continued prosperity of your lodge- 

I remain, 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

Yours fraternally, 
CHARLES DALRYMPLE. 

GRAND MASTER MASON OF SCOTLAND 

The Most Worshipful Brother J. W. Smith, the Grand 

Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, was pleased 

to write also personally to the Worshipful Master saying, 

" I have read the history with the greatest interest and 

35 



274 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

congratulate you on your being the Jubilee Master, of. a 
lodge with so excellent a record. " 

The pamphlets were also sent to the Indian Masonic 
Journal, Madras, and The Freemason, London, for publi- 
cation. Brother D. R. Chichgar was this year appoint- 
ed Grand Master Depute of the Grand Lodge of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India while Brother F. D. Petit 
was appointed Junior Grand Warden. 



CHAPTER XXXII. 



1894. During the year 1894 five new members were 
enrolled of whom one was an affiliate and four were 
initiates- The affiliate was Brother Mansck Rustomji 
Dossabhai Sethna, hailing from Lodge Marine, Calcutta, 
and the initiateswere Mr- Jijibhai Pramji Petit ( now Sir 
Dinshaw Manekji Petit, Baronet II) and Messrs Fazulbhai 
Currimbhai Ibhrahim, Cursetji Hormusji Captain, and 
Moherji Hormusji Kothari, all of whom, except the last 
named, it is satisfactory to note, have continued since as 
subscribing members. 

Brother Pestanji Muncherji Nicholson rejoined while 
Brothers Cursetji Cowasji Mehta and Manekji Hormusji 
Maju resigned and Brother Jafferbhai Ludhabhai Chatoo 
died- The lodge recorded in its minutes its expression of 
grief at the death of Brother Chatoo who was reputed to 
be a very amiable and zealous Mason and was always 
known for his truly masonic spirit, and passed votes of 
sympathy with his bereaved family and his mother-lodge 
Islam- 

There were four initiations, three passings, and three 
raisings during the year- 

Brother Currimbhai Ibhrahim had this year made a 
princely donation to his co-religionists of Rs. 1,00,000 (one 
lac) for the founding of an orphanage for the benefit of the 
poor of his community, and the brethren of the lodge, in 
order to mark their sense of esteem for the donor as well 
as their appreciation of the noble and philanthrophic mo- 
tives that had actuated his benevolent act voted, by accla- 
mation, an address which was subsequently presented to 



276 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

him written in gold on parchment and this worthy Bro- 
ther while acknowledging the high compliment paid to 
him presented to the lodge a sum of Rs. 250 to be credit- 
ed to the Charity Funds. 

The Jamshedi Naoroze festival wa^ held this year 
under the management of Lodge Eastern Star, and this 
time also ladi-es were invited ta the entertainment which 
formed a part of the usual programme and consisted of 
vocal and instrumental music and a dramatic perfor- 
mance. A considerable number of the members partici- 
pated in idle festival 

The Joint Hall Committee wera still evolving some pro- 
ject for a Masomic Temple, and in order not to allow any 
opportunity to pass without being availed of and to be 
able to act on the spot without delay and circuitous action 
resolutions were passed in the beginning of the year by 
the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, 
authorising its representatives on the Committee or any 
Sub-comittee appointed by them acting in conjunction with 
the Board of General Purposes of the District Grand 
Lodge or its Sub-committee, to acquire either by hire or 
purchase any building or building site, etc , for a common 
Masonic Hall with the concurrence of a majority and the 
Grand Masters of the two constitutions or their deputies 
or representatives in charge- 

The great, if not the chief, stumbling block in the way 
of having a masonic hall, was not so much in raising 
funds as in raising the rents of the different bodies 
under both constitutions meeting therein sufficiently to 
enable tihe Hall Committee to pay the interest on the 
debentures to be issued and to provide a sinking fund 
with which to liquidate the capital debt in due course. 
There was no difficulty about getting the debentures 
subscribed, but the different lodges had demurred to 
having their, rents raised. To surmount this difficulty 
and to get together a fund on which no interest would 




Jubilee Medal Obverse 




Juoilee Medal Reverse 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 277 

have to be paid the Grand Lodge at a Communication 
held on 5th November 1894 passed a resolution on the 
motion of Right Worshipful K. R. Cama that circulars be 
sent to the daughter-lodges inviting subscriptions to the 
Hall Fund, and in order to start the fund it also subs- 
cribed Rs- 500 thereto. 

The Hall Committee did not renew the lease of the 
Huntly Lodge at Clare Road which expired in October of 
this year, but rented other premises, in the Adelphi Hotel, 
Byculla, where all the bodies thereafter met. 

They had previously been negotiating for the purchase 
of a suitable property and in anticipation of. their making 
a call, in the event of the negotiations being completed, 
upon Lodge Rising Star far the Nowroji Nanabhai Trust 
Funds, the lodge appointed a Sub-committee consisting of 
the Right Worshipful Master Brother F. D. Petit and 
Brothers K- R. Cama, M. C- Murzban, D- R. Chichgar, 
H- M. Chichgar, Hormusji Dadabhai, R. M. Patel, 
M. J. Talyarkhan and Rustom K- R. Cama to consider the 
Trust Deed with reference to the proposed scheme. 

The Jubilee Medal voted for presentation to Brother 
F- D. Petit, was ordered out from Messrs. George 
Kenning, of Aldergate Street, London. It was in gold, 
and forty more medals for the brethren in silver also 
arrived with it. On the obverse of all the medals is the 
effigy of Brother Framji Dinsha Petit and the inscription 
" Jubilee 15th December 1893, Lodge' Rising Star of 
Western India No- 342 S C-" on the rim, and on the re- 
verse is shown a star rising from the sea ; and- the inscrip- 
tion on the rim of ^11 medals except the presentation one 
* Brother Framji Dinshaw Petit installed 15th December 
1893." The presentation medal bore on its rim on the re- 
verse which was made broader than that of the other 
medals the following inscription : 

" To Right Worshipful Brother F. D. Petit from Lodge 
Rising Star No. 342 S- C.; Bombay, 15th December 1893-" 



278 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The medal was presented to Brother Petit at the 
installation meeting, in the presence of a large and distin- 
guished gathering, at the hands of the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India who in 
a short but felicitous speech paid a high and fitting 
tribute to the sterling masonic qualities of the recipient 
of the honour who, he said, was a " brilliant star in the 
masonic firmament emulating a brightness of the heaven- 
ly bodies from which the Eastern Star, of which he was 
a child since 1883, and the Rising Star, to which he was 
affiliated five years later, had derived their names." 
Brother Petit had during his regime established more 
than ever before his claim to the esteem and regard of 
the brethren over whom he ruled and whose happiness, it 
is said, by all the means in his power he strove to ad- 
vancs, and to mark such esteem in a permanent form, the 
lodge voted a Past Master's jewel and presented to him 
at this installation meeting a walnut wood writing-desk 
costing Rs- 382 and a walnut wood stand with chiming 
bells. The desk was to. remind him that labour was the 
lot of man and that while it was day he must work 
and also that it was made from a tree which was a na- 
tive of Persia, as all Parsis were, and that it was a large 
tree, with spreading branches, which would always recall 
to his mind that from the strong trunk l< Lodge Rising 
Star/' other native lodges had emanated, and further that 
like the timber of the walnut, which was very durable, 
reliable and could take the finest polish, good Masons 
could become highly polished gentlemen and valuable 
members of society if they only paid proper attention to 
the useful lessons laid down in the rituals. The chiming 
bells were to serve as a remembrance of the many plea- 
sant hours spent by the worthy Brother within the sacred 
walls of the lodge and also to bid him attend a call to 
duty and that of humanity and thereby giving him an 
opportunity of doing good to his fellow-creatures in the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 279 

hour of their distress- Brother Petit was now Substitute 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freema- 
sonry in India. 

Rs. 100/ were voted to the Scottish Masonic Benevolent 
Association in India and the name of Brother M. J. Taly- 
arkhan was later on associated with it so as to make him 
a life-governor of that fund. 

1895. Brother Petit's stewardship ended and Brother 
M. J. Talyarkhan's commenced on 15th December, 1894, 
with 56 Subscribing Members on the roll, of whom 42 were 
full members, against 39 at the end of last year, and 
General Funds amounting to Rs 2,431-8-4 and Charity 
Funds to Rs. 11,554-10-6. 

But Brother Pettft was not) destined to live longj to 
continue the good work which as a man and" Mason he 
had so far done, for the cruel hand of death removed him 
from this earthly tabernacle to the sublunary abode above 
on 8th August 1895 to the great sorrow of his aged father, 
his family and friends and the whole masonic fraternity. 
He was still at his death Substitute Grand Master ; and 
according to the constitutions a special Funeral Lodge 
wa held in his memory by the Grand Lodge of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India on 28th August. 

Lodge Rising Star, in consequence, refrained fram 
holding a Lodge of Sorrow but passed a resolution express- 
ing sorrow and sympathy with the family of the deceased 
Brother in their sad bereavement. 

Brother Pirosha Bomanji Jijibhai was affiliated and 
Messrs. Dossabhai Framji Wadia (the author of this 
History), Kavasji Dadabhai Hormusji Dubash, Bomanji 
Ardesir Dalai, Framroze Pestanji Doctor, Ardesir Framji 
Unwala, and Nanabhai Muncherji Nowroji Banaji, were 
initiated during the year and ijhe degree work consisted 
of 5 initiations, 4 passings, and 4 raisings. 

Brother M- J. Talyarkhan made a very popular and 
gentle Master and though he could not work the lodge 



280 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 



as often as he could wish owing 1 to the heavy call on his 
attention to his professional work he always looked 
with a watchful eye to the best interests of the lodge. It 
is well known that in working the degrees he did not 
adhere to the strict letter or form of the ritual, but 
carried out concisely and substantially the spirit thereof. 

Brother M. M- Bhownugree was the second native 
of India, who this; year succeeded in entering the British 
House of Commons from Bethnall Green, and the lodge 
rejoiced at this event which brought the highest honours 
again too one of it members, and addressed 1 to him 
a special letter of congratulation and it also passed 
a special resolution of welcome when this Brother 
visited it after his return from England in the following 
year. 

Right Worshipful Brother Cowasji Dadabhai Furdoonji 
(known familiarly as Brother C. D. Furdoonji) who is a 
prominent figure in the Craft in Bombay and can claim 
connection with more lodges than one either as Founder 
or Member, Ordinary or Honorary, had until now (as he has 
also since) favoured Lodge Rising Star with his visits 
whenever sought, and even served it on occasions. His 
name as a Visiting Brother can be traced in the records 
of the lodge so far back as 1869. Great service was ren- 
dered by him on the occasion of the Jubilee when he and 
Brothers Murzban and D- R. Chichgar looked after the 
decorations and exhibitied not only good aesthetic taste 
and arrangements but left! nothing undone to make the 
occasion a great success from every point of; view. In 
tpken of the appreciation of his services on that memorable 
occasion the lodge presented to him a silver Jubilee 
Medal which he was kind enough to accept- 

The lodge took parb in the Jamshedi Naoroze festival 
which was celebrated this year under the management 
of! Lodge Rising Sun and in the same manner as during 
the preceding two years. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 281 

1896. The year commenced with 54 members on the 
roll of whom 42 were full paying members- Brother 
Fazalbhai Visram was installed in the Eastern Chair on 
1st February 1896. During his regime the numerical 
strength decreased by one member- There was one resig- 
nation and two deaths and one member's name was 
struck off for default in payment of lodge dues and these 
were counterbalanced by two affiliations and one initiation- 
The resigning member was Brother (now Sir) Dorab J. 
Tata and the member stiruck off was Brother Muljibhai 
Jivraj while the two that passed away from this transi- 
tory world were Brothers Pestanji Muncherji Nicholson 
and Nanabhai M. Banaji- The latter was the very young- 
est member, who had joined the lodge only four months 
before, and was a promising Brother who, if life had been 
spared to him, would have made a valuable and useful 
Member of the Craft, and on his death the lodge duly 
recorded a vote of sympathy with the family of the 
deceased in their sad and deplorable loss. The affiliates 
were Brothers Dhahjibhai Merwanji Jijibhai and Ratansha 
Kershaspji Dadachanji and the initiate wa;s Mr. Manekji 
Cowasji Petit- 

A Past Master's jewel was voted to Brother M. J. 
Talyarkhan and Rs. 200/ were contributed to the Scottish 
Benevolent Association of India- 

The Jamshedi Naoroze festival was held this year 
under the management of Lodge Cyrus and the members 
of the lodge largely participated in it 

The Masonic Hall question was now nearing a definite 
solution after several years' labour and discussion. The site 
on which the Hall now stands was pointed out by Worship- 
ful Brother G. O. W. Dunn, then Depute District Grand 
Master of Bombay, and an energetic member of the Hall 
Committee, and on the same being approved negotiations 
for acquiring it were carried on and brought to a head 
through Brother the Honble. Nowroji N t - Wadia with 

26 



282 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Government, and the Hall Committee had formulated a 
scheme for the acquisition and construction of the Hall, 
and in order to enable it to carry it out had issued circu- 
lars in the beginning of the year to the different Lodges, 
Chapters, and Bodies working under the two constitutions 
as well as others meeting in the Hall, inquiring what 
amount of debentures the members individually would 
take and whether their charitable and other funds could 
be relied upon to take debentures at 4 per cent, per 
annum and to what extent- 

The Hall Committee then also inquired of the lodge 
whether it would hand over to them the Nowroji Nana- 
bhai Trust Funds and what memorial would be required 
to fulfil the Trust. 

The matter was then discussed and the lodge resolved 
to take the opinion of the Advocate-General as to whether 
the Trustees of! the fund could give it to the Joint Hall 
Committee for the building of the proposed Hall and it 
unanimously resolved to invest Rs, 5,000/ out of the Char- 
ity funds in the 4 per cent, debentures and further made 
a donation of Rs. 500 / to the Building Fund out of its 
Charity funds. 

Counsel's opinion was accordingly taken on a case 
submitted by Brother H. M. Chichgar's firm of Messrs. 
Nanu and Hormusji and the Hall Committee were there- 
after informed that the funds would be handed over but 
that the land for the new Masonic Hall should be acquired 
in the name of the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India and that the Hall should be named the "Framji 
Cowasji Masonic Hall." 

Thereupon correspondence took place between Brother 
H, M. Chichgar and Brother Richard Sneade Brown 
(the President of the Hall Committee) who was a zealous 
and hardworking Mason and cordially advanced the 
scheme, and also between the Hall Committee Secretary 
and the Trustees of the Fund, The Advocate-General 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 283 

had advised the institution of a friendly suit by the 
lodge against the Trustees of the Fund for the administra- 
tion of the Trust Funds, 

The whole question was left by the lodge to the Stand- 
ing Committee for final disposal with liberty to make 
such terms for the transfer of the Trust Funds as to them 
might seem proper and also to arrange for the institution 
of the suit. 

The Hall Committee meanwhile with the object of 
facilitating the acquirement of the funds and strengthen- 
ing the Trustees' hands in going to the Court addressed 
the Trustees a letter undertaking that there should be 
erected in the Hall a tablet bearing the following inscrip- 
tion : 

"The Framji Cowasji Banqueting Hall. Part of the 
expenses of the erection of this Hall was met by the 
contribution of funds held on the Trusts created by the 
Worshipful Brother N. N. Framji of Lodge Rising Star 
of Western India No. 342 S. C., and by the leave of the 
High Court in accordance with which this Hall is to be 
called by the above name." 

The Standing Committee resolved that a suit should be 
filed for the administration of the Trust Funds provided 
the Banqueting Hall be simply called the Framji Cow- 
asji Banqueting Hall without any addition or qualifica- 
tion whatever, and that a suitable tablet bearing the said 
title be affixed at the entrance of the said hall, and that 
such tablet be at all times properly maintained, and 
further that a member of Lodge Rising Star be at all 
times appointed a member of the Hall Committee. 

This resolution after being adopted by the lodge was 
in due course communicated to the Joint Hall Committee 
who thankfully accepted the terms therein embodied 
and the necessary steps for filing the friendly suit were 
then taken. 



CHAPTER XXXIII. 



1897. -At the installation meeting held on 15th Decem- 
ber at which Brother P. M. Kanga was installed as Wor- 
shipful Master, the lodge had the honour of a visit from 
Worshipful Brother His Excellency the Right Honourable 
Lord Sandhurst, G. C. I. E., Pro-District Grand Master of 
Bombay E.G. His Lordship was the first Governor of the 
Presidency of Bombay who graced the lodge with his 
presence and was accorded a hearty and fitting welcome, 
and in acknowledging it in a felicitous short speech, 
wished the lodge every success. His Excellency's kind- 
ness was appreciated all the more highly as he had, as 
was then well known, attended at great personal inconve- 
nience and when he could spare but little time owing to 
his multifarious public duties which engrossed his sym- 
pathetic and close attention in the amelioration of the 
distress then generally prevalent. 

His Lordship wasi at this very meeting proposed as an 
Honorary Member and was early in the following year 
duly elected as such and was pleased to convey his 
acceptance of the honour in a letter addressed by him to 
the RigM Worshipful Master. 

Brother Nowroji Nusserwanji Wadia, C. I. E. (now a 
member of the Legislative Council of His Excellency the 
Governor of Bombay) and Brother Bejonji Nanabhai 
Kapadia ( both since gone to the Grand Lodge above) 
were affiliated and Mr. Surosh K. R. Cama, a third son of 
Brother K. R. Cama and introduced by the latter, was 
initiated this year. But the lodge was again unfortunate 
in having to suffer by the deaths of Brothers the Honour- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.'C. 285 

able Abdulla M. Dharamsi and Dhanjibhai Merwanji 
Jijibhai, and further Brothers Shapoor N. Bhedwar, 
Ardesir C. Homji, D. H.Karaka and Fazalbhai M. China! 
resigned during the year. 

Resolutions of regret were duly recorded in the minutes 
of the lodge on the deaths of Brothers D. M. Jijibhai 
and Dharamsi. 

The affiliation fee was raised from Rs. 25 to Rs. 75, 
and the joining fee from Rs. 5 to Rs. 15 as from October 
of this year. 

The friendly suit for the administration of the Nowroji 
Nanabhai Trust Funds was filed about the middle of this 
yvjar. It was suit No. 352 of 1897, and at the end of the 
year still awaited trial. 

Messrs Nanu and Hormusji, Solicitors, were the attor- 
neys for the lodge as also the Trustees of the Fund. 

For the first time in the history *of Freemasonry in 
India both the English and Scotch constitutions were 
placed under the presidency and government of one and 
the same Brother. That unique position fell to the lot of 
Right Worshipful Brother Lord Sandhurst who, on Right 
Worshipful Brother J. W. Smith, then Grand Master of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India, retiring, was nominated in 
his place to fill that exalted position by the Grand Lodge 
of Scotland on 4th June 1897. His Lordship was duly in- 
stalled in his high office at a special convocation of the 
Grand Lodge held on that day at the Novelty Theatre, 
which was converted into a masonic temple for the occa- 
sion, and Lodge Rising Star took part in that pleasing 
function. The union of the two highest posts in the 
sister constitutions in the person of such a high and 
eminent Mason meant, as was later on evidenced, By a 
still closer union than then existed between the bodies 
under either banner and the individual members thereof. 
His Excellency in spite of the various calls on his atten- 
tion owing to public exigencies was still able, as he was 



286 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

at the same time always anxious, to devote some time to 
masonic affairs, and it was to his great impetus and 
encouragement that the Masonic Temple became in his 
time an accomplished fact. 

On 5th June 1897, His Excellency as the Grand Master 
of All Scottish Freemasonry in India and Pro-District 
Grand Master of Bombay, laid the foundation stone of the 
Masonic Hall in the presence of a large and distinguished 
gathering of the members of the fraternity and the 
public. A special convocation of the Grand Lodge was 
held again at the Novelty Theatre, situate opposite to the 
site of the Hall. After both the Grand Lodges were 
opened and temporarily adjourned, and the brethren had 
in two columns abreast marched from the theatre to the 
site where the stone was placed, the Grand Master 
arrived in a procession and with all customary forma- 
lities laid the foundation stone. Lodge Rising Star was 
largely represented on the occasion. At the ceremony a 
history of the movement for a joint masonic hall compiled 
by Right Worshipful Brother J. W. Smith was read in 
which the following remarks were inter alia made : 

' The Masonic Fraternity at the same time are grateful 
to the Trustees and Members of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India No. 342, Scottish Constitution, for their 
co-operation and for the conditional promise of their 
handsome contribution of about Rs- 13,000, being the 
Trust money left by the late Brother Nowroji Nanabhai 
Framji Banaji for building a Hall to be called ' The 
Framji Cowasji Masonic Hall/ The terms on which Lodge 
Rising Star is willing to part with the money are that 
after the institution of a friendly suit 'the High Court 
shall permit the administration accordingly of the Trust 
Fund of the Nowroji Nanabhai Settlement provided 
that the Banqueting Hall be called the Framji Cowasji 
Banqueting Hall, that a suitable tablet bearing the said 
title be affixed at the entrance to the said hall or on a 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. .342 S.C. 287 

conspicuous part of the said hall, that such tablet be at all 
times properly maintained, and further that a member 
of Lodge Rising Star be at all times appointed one of the 
members of the Hall Committee. These terms having been 
considered reasonable have been accepted by the Hall 
Committee, and they have requested the Trustees of the 
Fund and the lodge to jointly proceed at an early date 
to institute the suggested suit and obtain leave of the 
High Court to pay over the Trust Funds to the Free- 
masons ' Joint Hall Committee on the conditions agreed 
upon." 

The lodge had already made a donation of Rs.500 to 
the Building Fund and individual members between them- 
selves made donations amounting in all to Rs. 3,300 of 
which Rs. 1,000 were contributed by Brother Jijibhai 
Framji Petit in memory of his father, and Rs. 500 by 
Brother Currimbhai Ibhrahim ; and a Parsi gentleman 
had also contributed Rs. 1,000 to the fund through the 
lodge. Brother Nowroji Manekji Wadia, C- I. E.,the great 
Parsi millionaire and philanthropist and an ex-member 
of the lodge, also made a donation through the lodge of 
Rs. 1,000 in niBinory of his mother the late Bai Motlabai 
Jehangir Wadia. 

A list of the donations was appended to the history 
read at the laying of the foundation stone, and it 
appears therefrom that Lodge Rising Star stands out 
first and foremost therein. 

Later on, by the end of the year, two further donations 
were made to the Building Fund, viz ; Rs. 1,000 by Brother 
Manekji Kavasji Petit in memory of his late father Mr. 
Cowasji Dinshaw Petit, and Rs.1,000 subscribed by Sir 
Jehangir Cowasji Jehangir, Knight (who has since assum- 
ed the name and title of Sir Cowasji Jehangir, Baronet ) 
and others, and sent through the lodge to perpetuate the 
memory of the late Worshipful Brother Dhanjibhai 
Merwanji Jijibhai- Brothers the Hon. N. N. Wadia and 



288 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

D, R. Chichgar were appointed by the Grand Lodge Trus- 
tees of the New Hall. 

The installation meeting was held on 15th December 
and the lodge had the honour of a second visit from the 
Most Worshipful Brother H. E. Lord Sandhurst. It was a 
matter of peculiar gratification to the lodge to find that 
that was the first official visit of the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India to a 
daughter-lodge at its installation meeting after assuming 
the reins of his exalted office. In spite of the numerous calls 
he had necessarily to attend to in the discharge of his multi- 
farious duties in the government of the Presidency, His 
Lordship had readily responded to the call of his masonic 
duty and by his presence invested the proceedings of the 
evening with special interest, to the great gratification of 
the brethren. After the retiring Master, Brother P. M. 
Kanga, had rendered an account of his stewardship His 
Lordship addressed the brethren and in doing so shared in 
the regret caused by the deaths of the late Brothers the 
Hon. Abdulla Dharamsiand DhanjibhaiMerwanji Jijibhai, 
and paid a tribute to the former wjio, he said, was not only 
a distinguished citizen but was also a clever and skilful 
professional man and a zealous and painstaking member 
of the Legislative Council. His Excellency also paid a 
special compliment to the lodge on the prosperous condi- 
tion of its finances, which now, after all disbursements 
and donations, stood at Rs. 2,148-6-0 general account and 
Rs. 11,487-7-2 charity account- He then introduced to th3 
lodge a distinguished Mason, namely, Brother E. F. G. 
Hatch, M. P. for the Eastern Division of Lancashire, who 
was then on a visit to India and was a guest at Govern- 
mant House, and in conclusion observed that he had been 
looking forward then for soma time to visit the lodge and 
that the large number of brethren he saw before him 
outdid his expectations, and that he was pleased to observe 
that in the lodge Europeans, Hindus, Mussalmans, and 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 289 

Parsis all united together in one bond of friendship and 
that a better verification of the many advantages of 
Freemasonry could not be found. 

Brother Hatch, on being requested by the Worshipful 
Master to address the brethren, said that it had given him 
great pleasure to attend the lodge, where he was glad to 
observe the representatives of the different communities 
of Bombay, and that he was glad that, H. E. Lord Sand- 
hurst had given him an opportunity of seeing the inside 
of a native lodge, and that he would carry home with him 
a pleasant impression of his visit as it was one of the 
most interesting sights he had yet seen in India. 

The Most Worsipful the Grand Master as also Brother 
Hatch were suitably thanked by the newly installed Mas- 
ter, Brother Phiroze C. Sethna, who In the course of his 
remarks alluded in becoming praise to the great ability 
and judiciousness shown by the Grand Master in the 
advancement of both sections of the Craft and the impe- 
tus given to the development of Masonry in a marked 
degree and his encouragement in the matter of the Maso- 
nic Hall and above all his great urbanity, large-hearted- 
ness, and benevolence of spirit which had won for him 
amongst the Masons of his generation ungrudging regard, 
esteem, and attachment, and concluded by saying that the 
Masons of the next generation might well refer to him 
and say that he : 

" Above the rest 

In shape and nature proudly eminent 
Stood like a tower." 

At the installation meeting a third contribution of 
Rs. 150 was voted to the Henry Morland Memorial 
Fund and a Past Master's Jewel was voted to Brother 
P. M. Kanga. 

Brother H. M. Chiehgar was now Honorary Substitute 
Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India. 



27 



CHAPTER XXXIV. 

1898. The year 1898 began with 56 members on the roll 
and 5 more were added during the year, viz., Mr- Pirosha 
Dadabhai Manekji Sett, Dr. Dossabhai Cursetji Rustomji 
Sethna and Dr. Dhanjibhai Rustomji Ardesir Wadia who 
were initiated arid Brother Pestanji Cowasji Pallonji 
Sethna, affiliated from Lodge Royal Sussex of Shanghai, 
China, No 501 E. C., and Brother Kavasji Byramji Shroff 
who came as a joining member from Lodge Hamilton, 
No. 584 S. C , Surat. 

There was not a single resignation but there were two 
deaths. Brother Burjorji Pallonji Dollimeherji died on 
23rd February 1898 and a special Lodge of Sorrow was 
held in his memory on the 5th March following. After the 
funeral service was performed in the customary manner 
Brother K. R. Cama delivered an oration suitable to the 
occasion, in which he differentiated between Masons of 
a day who gave up after being initiated, Masons who 
worked up to the Master's chair and whose interest there- 
after ceased, and Masons who continued active members 
of their lodge all their life, and he held forth to the 
younger Masons the instance of the deceased Brother who 
was initiated in the lodge so far back as 20th May 1870 
and who although he had never occupied the chair had 
yet continued to be an active member up to his death and 
had all along proved his usefulness in a quiet, unostenta- 
tious manner. He also recounted the many good qualities 
of the late lamented Brother and interposed his oration 
with much masonic knowledge. Resolutions were also 
passed recording the great regret of the lodge at the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 291 

death and expressing sympathy with the family of the 
deceased. 

Brother Dr. Atmaram Pandurang, an Honorary Member 
of the lodge, died within three months afterwards. 

The degree work during the year consisted of three 
initiations, one passing and one raising, and some useful 
lectures were delivered by Brothers D. R. Chichgar and 
F. J. Patel on balloting and on the tracing board respec- 
tively. 

The friendly suit filed by the lodge last year for the 
administration of the Nowroji Nanabhai Trust Funds was 
decided and a decree was passed therein by the Honourable 
Mr- Justice Fulton on 17th January 1898 as prayed for, 
permitting the Trustees to. hand over the funds to the 
Joint Masonic Hall Committee on the agreed terms. 
(See appendix Q for a copy of the decree.) The decree 
was then referred to the Standing Committee with 
power to them to finally dispose of the matter. Draft of 
an agreement between the Trustees of the Fund and the 
Hall Committee (not as such Committee only but also for 
and on behalf of the persons for theitime being owners of 
the Masonic Temple and so as to bind the said temple) was 
prepared by the Solicitors and was in due course submitted 
to the Standing Committee, who considered and approved 
of the same at a meeting at which Brother Nanu Narayan 
Kothare, partner in the firm of Messrs. Nanu and Hormus- 
ji, attended by invitation of the Standing Committee to as- 
sist them in their deliberations in the absonce of Brother 
H. M. Chichgar, who had proceeded to England on busi- 
ness, and the draft as settled by the Standing Committee 
was submitted to the Hall Committee for their acceptance- 

The Hall Committee approved of the draft with this 
exception, however, that a member representing Lodge 
Rising Star on their Committee should be elected not by 
the lodge as proposed in tha draft but be appointed by the 
Most Worshipful the Grand Master of all Scottish Free- 



292 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

masonry in India. The point was discussed in the Stand- 
ing Committee and they were in favour of a proposal, to 
submit every year names of three or four members, of 
whom one should be selected by the Grand Master, and 
Brother H. M. Chichgar (who had returned from Eng- 
land) was authorised to make the necessary alterations 
in the draft received back from the Hall Committee, and 
a communication on the subject was also addressed to the 
Grand Secretary with a view to its being placed before 
the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, which proposed 
the arrangement that the member from Lodge Rising 
Star should always be annually selected by the lodge itself 
and that his name should be submitted for nomination to 
the Grand Master at least one month before the time fixed 
for the election of members of the Hall Committee by the 
Grand Master, and that in case of the death, resignation, 
or other incapacity of such member, a fresh selection 
should be made, the lodge submitting for nomination 
the name of another member within two months from the 
happening of such death, resignation, or incapacity. 

The Grand Master was plea'sed to sanction this arrange- 
ment, allowing the nomination of a member on the Hall 
Committee to rest with the lodge. 

The agreement (vide Appendix R) was then in due 
course drawn up and executed and the balance of 
the Trust Funds, consisting of Government Paper of the 
3J per cent., of the nominal value of Rs. 13,400, and cash 
amounting to Rs. 1,536-7-1 (being R,s. 9,000 the sale pro- 
ceeds of the land originally held on trust and accumulated 
interest thereon) after deducting Rs. 672-12-0 for 
out-of-pocket costs only in connection with the friendly 
suit, were handed over to the Hall Committee in October 
1908. Brother K. R. Cama was appointed the member 
from the lodge on the Hall Committee pursuant to the 
arrangement which was sanctioned before by the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 293 

The lodge also recorded a resolution in the minutes, 
when the funds were handed over, thanking the Trustees 
for the ability, the zeal, and the judiciousness with which 
they had carried out so long the management of the Trust 
Funds. 

Brother Hormusji M. Chichgar and his firm were also 
thanked for the services rendered by them in connec- 
tion with the friendly suit and the carrying out of the 
decree passed therein- 

A testimonial was got up by Lodge Perseverance to 
Right Worshipful Brother J- W. Smith, Immediate Past 
Grand Master, in recognition of the services rendered by 
him to the Craft, and was to consist of an oil-painting of 
that Brother, and the lodge subscribed its mite thereto. 

Rs. 100 were as usual subscribed this year also to the 
Scottish Benevolent Association of India. 

For the third time the lodge had the honour of being 
visited by His Excellency Lord Sandhurst at the installa- 
tion meeting held on 15th December, when Brother P. C. 
Sethna was re-installed in King Solomon's chair, that 
Brother having by his conduct in it, during the preceding 
twelve months, won so far the esteem and approbation of 
the brethren as to merit being entrusted with the hiram a 
second time. It was announced at this meeting in the 
course of the account of the Worshipful Master's steward- 
ship that in addition to the Nowroji Nanabhai Trust 
Funds, amounting to Rs. 15,000, the munificent sum of 
Rs. 23,000 had through the medium of the lodge been 
subscribed to the Masonic Hall Building Fund by 
individual members and others connected with it, viz., 
Sir Dinsha Manekji Petit, Baronet ( who had made hand- 
some donations to perpetuate the memory of his son the 
late Brother Framji Dinsha Petit ) Sir Jehangir Cowasji 
Jehangir and others and that the lodge had made a fur- 
ther donation of Rs. 300 since the donation of Rs. 500 
made in the preceding year, and the members had 



294 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

amongst themselves subscribed a further sum of Rs. 500 
in commemoration of His Excellency's visit that evening, 
both of which sums were intended to be presented to the 
New Temple which was thus getting nearly one-fifth of 
the total outlay on it from and through Lodge Rising 
Star. 

At this meeting the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master paid the lodge special honour by obligating 
Right Worshipful Brother Dr. Pollen as Grand Master 
Depute of all Scottish Freemasonry in India. 

His Excellency addressed the members at some length 
and in doing so paid Brother P. C Sethna a high compli- 
ment for the ability and precision with which he had per- 
formed the ceremony that evening, and congratulated the 
lodge on the harmony and good-fellow ship- that prevailed 
therein and t;he large and representative gathering of 
Masons such as he had never witnessed, he said, in any 
other lodge, and the generous way in which they had 
contributed to the new Masonic Temple. 

It might here be mentioned that in consideration of the 
substantial contribution by the Petit family towards the 
Building Fund and as a mark of respect and esteem for 
the late Right Worshipful Brother Framji Dinshaw 
Petit the Hall Committee resolved that the second Dining 
Hall or Committee Room should be called " the Framji 
Dinshaw Petit Banqueting Hall " and that a suitable 
tablet bearing an inscription to this effect be placed in the 
said room. This was done and later on a medallion of 
the late Brother was presented by his widow Bai Awabai 
to be placed in the Hall with a marble tablet as was 
proposed by the Hall Committee with a suitable inscrip- 
tion, and this medallion has since been placed in that 
Hall. 

Brother M. C. Murzban was now Honorary Grand 
Master Depute and Brother H. M. Chichgar Substitute 
Grand Master anc} Brother Pestanji M. Kanga was 



OF WESfE&N INDIA No. 342 S.C. 295 

Assistant Grand Secretary of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India. 

In the year 1899 nine more members were added, viz., 
Dr. Hormusji Manekji Masina, F. R. C. S., London, Sham- 
shul Ulma Jivanji Jamsetji Mody, Mr. Bomanji Dinshaw 
Petit, and Mr. Darasha Bejonji Mehta (Solicitor) who 
were initiated, and Brother Dr. Meherjibhai Rustomji 
Sethna, who was affiliated from Lodge Victoria No, 1026 
E. C., Hongkong. Brother (now Sir) -N. G. Chandavarkar 
rejoined the lodge, and three distinguished brethren were 
made Honorary Members, namely, Right Worshipful Bro- 
ther Sir Lawrence Hugh Jenkins, the Chief Justice of 
Bombay, and District Grand Master, E. C-, Dr. John 
Pollen, Grand Master Depute of All Scottish Free- 
masonry in India, and Brother I. M. Shields. 

Brothers Hormusji Dadabhai and R, K. Dadachanji 
resigned and Brother Dr. Atmaram Pandurang died. 

The degree work consisted of four initiations, three 
passings, and three raisings. 

An attempt was made this year on the suggestion of 
Brother K. R. Cama to revive the Jamshedji Naoroze 
masonic festival which had been for some reasons in 
abeyance for the last three years, and to invite all sister- 
lodges to take part and co-operate therein. 

The New Masonic Hall was now an accomplished fact 
after the project for it was first mooted about 43 years 
ago. 

His Excellency Lord Sandhurst, the Most Worshipful 
the Grand Master of all Scottish Freemasonry in India 
and District Grand Master of Bombay, performed the 
ceremony of consecrating it for the meetings in future 
of all masonic bodies working under the two jurisdictions, 
on 25th March 1899, which was a red-letter day in 
the annals of Masonry, in the presence of a brilliant and 
numerous gathering of Masons of all castes, colours, and 
creeds. Lodge Rising Star was largely represented at the 



296 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

function. An anonymous donor presented Rs. 5,000 to 
the Hall Building Fund to perpetuate the regime of His 
Excellency as District Grand Master and Grand Master 
of all Scottish Freemasonry in India, on condition that 
the Temple should be named after His Excellency and 
that no individual's name should be thereafter associated 
with the entire Masonic Hall. The Temple was accord- 
ingly named "Lord Sandhurst Temple/' It may be noted 
here that the very first meeting held by a daughter-lodge 
in the Masonic Hall was held by Lodge Rising Star. 

It had occurred to some members of the Fraternity that 
that occasion would be a fitting one to reward Brother 
D. R. Chichgar for the valuable services rendered by him 
as Honorary Secretary to the Hall Committee ever since 
its formation and to show the esteem in which he was held, 
and a circular was issued to all the lodges in both cons- 
titutions, over the signatures of Right Worshipful Brothers 
Dr. John Pollen and I. M. Shields, inviting subscriptions, 
limited to one rupee per member, from which it was 
proposed to present a testimonial and an album containing 
the autographs of all the subscribers thereto. The circular 
was very heartily responded to and the subscriptions 
enabled the promoters of the movement, which, it may be 
stated, had the hearty support of H. E. Lord Sandhurst 
as the head of the two constitutions, to purchase a silver 
bowl and cup, and the articles were presented to Brother 
Chichgar by the Grand Master at the consecration cere- 
mony of the Hall as a fitting token of the distinguished and 
valuable services rendered by him for over 20 years to the 
Fraternity at large and particularly the Hall Committee. 

The following sums were voted by the lodge this year, 
viz-. 

(1) Rs. 10 per mensem to the A. F. Solon Memorial Fund, 
which was started by Lodge Rising Sun to afford relief 
to the family of Brother A. F. Solon, one of its Past 
Masters and Grand Senior Warden of AH Scottish 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 297 

Freemasonry in India; (2) Rs. 10 (second donation) 
towards the cast of the oil painting of Brother J. W. 
Smith, Past Grand Master, and (3) Rs. 200 to the 
Masonic Hall Building Fund. 

The brethren had between themselves raised subs- 
criptions in honour of the visit of the Most Worshipful 
the Grand Master, Lord Sandhurst, again at the in- 
stallation meeting this year and the Rs. 200 voted by 
the lodge were added thereto to make up Rs. 1,000, 
which entire sum was devoted to the funds of the Hall 
Committee with a request to the Trustees of the Hall 
to credit the amount in the name of Brother Darasha 
R, Chichgar. This was the farewell visit of His Excel- 
lency to the lodge, for early next year he relinquished 
the reins of government and, with that, of his office 
as the First Mason in the Presidency. During the year 
two donations were made to the Charity Funds of the 
lodge, viz., Rs. 200 left by the late Brother Dr. Atma- 
ram Pandurang as a bequest to the lodge by his last 
will and received from his executors, on condition that 
the amount should be credited in an account to be 
opened in the name of that deceased Brother and the 
interest thereon should be utilized for charitable purpo- 
ses, and Rs. 150 from Brother A. F. Un walla in memory 
of his late mother Bai Dinbai. Further, at the instal- 
lation meeting Brother J. F. Petit, who was installed in 
the Eastern Chair, presented to the lodge the handsome 
sum of Rs 1,000 as a contribution to the Charity Funds. 
At the close of the year the funds stood at Rs. 2,769-13-4 
in the general account and Rs. 11,285-13-2 in the charity 
account making a grand total of Rs 14,055-10-6. Brother 
P. C. Sethna was voted a Past Master's jewel and apron 
in recognition of the ability and zeal with which he had 
governed the lodge during two years. 

Brother K. R. Cama was nominated to represent the 
lodge on the Hall Committee, 



298 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Brother M.C. Murzban was now Honorary Grand Master 
Depute- It was resolved about the close of this year that 
a new banner should be ordered out for the lodge and 
that, the work should be entrusted to some artist in Bom- 
bay, the design of the old banner being retained as far as 
possible, and the matter was referred to the Standing 
Committee and that body entrusted the work to a Sub-. 
Committee consisting of Brothers K. R. Cama, M. C. 
Murzban, and D. R. Chichgar. 

1900. In the commencement of Brother J. F. Petit's 
rule, the lodge suffered a heavy blow in the death of a very 
useful member, namely, Worshipful Brother the Hon'ble. 
N. N. Wadia, C. I. E., which took place on 19th December 
1899. This Brother was an eminent citizen of real worth 
and was possessed of attainments of a very high order 
and above all af that virtue which is the distinguishing 
characteristic of a Freemason's heart, namely, charity. He 
had identified himself with several institutions in Bombay 
and was known for his good work not easily to be 
forgotten, and in Masonry he had left his mark, not easily 
to be effaced. A special Lodge of Sorrow was held in his 
memory on 13th January 1900, at which after the custo- 
mary service was performed and an oration suitable to 
the occasion was delivered by Brother D. R. Chichgar, 
the lodge passed resolutions expressing its deep grief at 
the death of the departed Brother and condoling with hi s 
family. Within three months the lodge had again to mourn 
another loss, viz., of Brother Jamsetji Cursetji Cama, whose 
agreeable and pleasing manners and quiet and unostenta- 
tious deportment and readiness to do all he could for the 
brethren after the noble example his late lamented father 
Brother Cursetji Nusserwanji Cama had set before him, 
had won the affection and esteem of the whole lodge. His 
face always wore a laugh, and he was never known to 
frown, and whether at the meetings or at the festive 
boards his genial personality always made itself felt. He 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 299 

never sought but was always sought after, and for his 
amiability and uniform courtesy and warm-hearted 
friendship he was as widely known in the circles outside 
as within the sacred walls of the lodge. He was several 
times offered the chair of the lodge, but declined the 
honour. He died on 20th March 1900, and a Lodge of 
Sorrow was held in his memory on 7th April following, at 
which the customary service was held and a resolution 
passed condoling with his family. 

The lodge was really very unfortunate, for Brother 
Maneksha Jehangirsha Talyarkhan followed Brother J. 
C. Cama to the eternal mansions on high within another 
three months, on i6th June 1900. This Brother had en- 
deared himself to the members of the lodge by his very 
genial and suave temperament, by his square conduct, and 
devotion to the best interests of the lodge and the 
advancement of the common happiness of the brethren. 
While travelling in Europe this worthy Brother met with a 
premature and sudden death as one of the victims in what 
was known as the Slough Railway Accident, and the news 
of his death filled the brethren with inexpressible grief, as 
it overwhelmed his near and dear ones and all who knew 
him. A life full of hopes, a man who was an ornament to 
his country, and a brother who loved and was loved by 
all, was thus cut off in the prime of life. A Funeral Lodge 
was held in his memory on 7th July, at which the usual 
resolutions were passed, and he was held up by those who 
spoke on the occasion as an example worthy of imitation ; 
whose place it was difficult to fill. Condolences were 
received from the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freema- 
sonry in India and Lodges St. George, Rising Sun, etc. 

Brother Phiroze C. Sethna, who was travelling with 
Brother Talyarkhan, narrowly escaped the same fate and 
was by Divine Providence saved to his family and friends 
to their great and unbounded joy, having been actually 
snatched from the jaws of death. 



300 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Brothers R. K. Dadachandji and A. F. Bahadurji and 
Hormusji Dadabhai resigned. 

Brothers Jehangir Bomanji Petit, Noshirwan Pirosha 
Dubash, and Abdeali M. Kajiji (Barrister-at-Law) were 
affiliated^ while Messrs. Jamshed Maneksha Doctor and 
Dossabhai Dadabhai Allbless and Dr. Sorab Cowasji 
Hormusji were initiated this year. Numerically there- 
fore the lodge stood at the end of the year as at the 
commencement thereof. 

The degree work consisted of three initiations and a 
like number of passings and raisings. 

H. E. Lord Sandhurst was about to depart from 
India in the beginning of the year, and the English and 
Scottish Grand Lodges had jointly recorded a resolution 
expressing their regret at his intended departure and 
their sense of appreciation of the services rendered by 
him during his regime to the Fraternity at large. His 
Excellency was also entertained at a farewell banquet 
followed by a reception on 9th February 1900, at the 
Masonic Hall. On this occasion His Lordship presented to 
Brother D. R. Chichgar an autograph album in recogni- 
tion of his work in the cause of Freemasonry and the 
Masonic Hall, and as a testimony of the good will and 
good wishes of all Masons in India, and in making the 
presentation said: 

41 His masonic work you know full well, and indeed if 
we are comparing notes as to whom thanks are due for 
the existence of this Hall I will certainly put Right 
Worshipful Brother Chichgar at the top of the poll. I 
think I said at the opening of this Hall that if >! had 
been lacking in my subscription to the funds of the 
Hall and I had my hundred rupee note in my pocket and 
I had seen Right Worshipful Brother Chichgar I should 
have taken to my heels as fast as I could, for I am 
perfectly certain that he could have got it outj of my 
innermost pocket/' 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3l>2 S.C Sol 

To the reception, which was largely attended by Masons, 
the ladies of their families were also invited. 

His Excellency was succeeded in the post of the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master by his successor in the 
office of the government of the Presidency, namely, the 
Right Honourable Henry Stafford Baron Northcote, 
G.C.I.E., C. B., who was duly installed therein on 17th 
December 1900, having been appointed to fill that office 
by a commission issued under the signatures of the 
Honourable James Hozier, M. P., Grand Master Mason, 
and D. Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary, under date 31st 
May 1900. Lord Northcote was Provincial Grand Master 
for Devonshire and also District Grand Master of 
Bombay and its territories. Again therefore and for 
the second time the two Grand Masterships were embodi- 
ed in the person of the Governor of Bombay, to the great 
advantage and advancement of the Craft in general. 

Brother J. W. Smith, Past Grand Master of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India, died on the 21st July 
1900 and the lodge duly recorded in the books votes of 
condolence with the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freema- 
sonry in India and the deceased's family and also went 
into mourning with the sister-lodges for a period of 
three months under directions from the Grand Master 
Depute then in charge of the Grand Lodge of All Scottish 
Freemasonry in India. 

Rupees Two Hundred were voted this year to the 
Scottish Benevolent Association and a foreigner named 
Jacob David, M. M. of Lodge Viconde De Ris Branco- 
Brazil Constitution, was helped with a sum of money 
towards providing for his passage to the Transvaal, his 
native place, which he had left during the war 

Brother Bhownugree was this year for the second time 
returned to Parliament by his North Bethnal Green 
constituency, and the lodge passed a resolution expressing 
satisfaction at the re-election and voting a letter of 



302 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

congratulation to the distinguished Brother and request- 
ing him to convey to his electors the best thanks of the 
lodge for the honour. The funds at the close of the year 
stood at the high figure of Rs- 14,719-4-6, of which the 
charity funds amounted to Rs. 11,846-8-10. A Past 
Master's jewel was voted to Brother J. F. Petit. 



CHAPTER XXXV. 

1901. Brother F. J. Patel was installed in the Eastern 
Chair on 15th December 1900 and remained in office till 
7th December 1901. This year passed off more or less 
quietly. There were two initiations, two passings, and 
one raising and some lectures were delivered by the Right 
Worshipful Master and Brother A. F. Unwalla. Three 
new members were admitted, viz., Messrs. Nowroji 
Hormusji and Muncherji Dorabji Dinsha Adenwalia, 
who were initiated; and Brother Nooroodin Ibhrahim 
Nooroodin, who was affiliated. But this addition to the 
rolls was reduced by two resignations, viz., of Brothers 
Fazulbhai Visram and Manekji Jehangir Gustadji. 

The whole Masonic Fraternity in Europe and India 
was thrown this year into grief by the death of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria, Empress of India, 
which happened in February 1901. Her Majesty was for 
more than half; a century patron of the Craft and Masons 
deplored her loss equally with the rest of the world at 
large. The lodge was in particular not lacking in the 
manifestation of its sorrow at the demise of the Sovereign. 
At the meeting held on 9th February 1901 it passed 
unanimously a resolution recording it and then adjourned 
without transaccing any business, in honour of that august 
lady now of happy and pious memory. Brother K. R. 
Cama in supporting the resolution proposed from the 
chair pointed out the keen interest always displayed in 
matters masonic by several members of the royal family, 
including her beloved son King Edward VII (most 
justly styled Edward the Peace-maker) and his Brother, 



304 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

our Honorary Member, His Royal Highness the Duke of 
Connaught. 

In common with the Indian public the lodge grieved 
within 4 months more at the sad death of Sir Dinsha 
Maneckji Petit. Bart, (the venerable grandfather of 
our good Brother, who has since assumed his name 
and title). The deceased was a great philanthropist 
and though not one belonging to the Fraternity, was 
in realty, in fact, and at heart, a true and genuine 
Mason who perhaps more than ever practised the excel- 
lent virtues inculcated by Masonry than any man of 
his time, and, above all, benevolence and charity. His 
handosme donations to the Craft in general and Lodge 
Rising Star in particular were too well known and his 
name has for ever remained written in the books of the 
lodge and the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India and will always be revered and cherished. At 
the meeting held on 1st June 1901 the lodge passed 
the following resolution : 

"The brethren of this lodge unanimously desire to 
place on record their feelings of the deepest regret and 
profound grief at the demise of so noble a philanthropist 
and public benefactor as Sir Dinsha M. Petit, Baronet," 

It also passed the usual votes of condolence with the 
members of his breaved family. 

Brother Captain C. D. Wise, the indefatigable Grand 
Secretary of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, also 
died about July of this year and the lodge passed 
votes of condolence with his widow and children and 
also with the Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freema- 
sonry in India on the loss to it of an energetic and 
zealous officer. This Brother was exact and precise 
in the performance of his masonic duties and was at. 
the same time exacting in the performance of them 
by others, and at all times rendered help to those who 
appealed to him for the same by treason of his experience 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S. 305 

and peculiar knowledge. His loss was one the Fraternity 
could ill afford. 

A Memorial Purse Fund was started by the Grand 
Lodge for the benefit of the widow of the deceased and 
the lodge subscribed its mite thereto. 

It was brought to the notice of the brethren thi s year by 
Brother D. R. Chichgar that a Council existed under the 
style of " The Framji Petit Council " the object of which 
was to instruct the brethren with still higher knowledge 
of the Craft than what was imparted in the lodge, and 
exhorted the brethren to keep the memory of Brother F. 
D. Petit ever green by joining the Council which, he said, 
was doing good work. A sum of Rs. 270 was subscribed 
by the brethren for defraying the cost of providing a 
new frame and varnishing and retouching the picture of 
Brother Manekji Cursetji hung up in the Freemasons' 
Hall, as it was in a ver$ old state and needed to be repair- 
ed and reframed so as to be in keeping with the other 
pictures in the room, and the amount was handed over for 
the purpose to the Joint Hall Committee who expended 
Rs. 225 for the purpose and devoted the balance to the cost 
of a silver engraved plate to be affixed to the framework. 

The short method of raising and lowering the lodge was 
in pursuance of a resolution of the Grand Lodge of Scot- 
land discontinued from this year. 

Brother Sir M. M. Bhownugree was this year appointed 
Honorary Grand Master Depute of All Scottish Freema- 
sonry in India and this was a compliment as much to that 
Brother as to his mother-lodge. 

The' charity funds of the lodge now amounted to 
Rs. 11,941-9-7, the latest contribution having been of 
Rs. 150 by Brother A. F. Un walla, made in the name of 
his late father and to t)e added to the fund then standing 
in the name of his mother. 

Rupees One Hundred were voted by the lodge to the 
Scottish Benevolent Association in India and a Past 

39 



306 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Master's jewel was voted to the retiring Master, Brother 
F. J. Patel. 

1902. Brother Pheerozeshaw N. Pleader was installed 
as Worshipful Master on 7th December 1901, having been 
elected previously to fill that exalted post by the unani- 
mous votes of the brethren; and as the records bear 
testimony he worked most zealously and heartily and 
succeeded in maintaining the prestige of the lodge and 
its high state of efficiency of working. Besides his own 
Brother, Brother Ardesir N. Pleader, he admitted into 
the mysteries of Freemasonry Mr. Gullamhussein Currim- 
bhoy Ibhrahim, a third son of our beloved Brother Sir 
Currimbhai Ibhrahim, Bart. Brother Spittam K. R. Cama, 
also a third son of our equally beloved and venerable 
Brothi^ P. R. Cama, was affiliated to the lodge and Brother 
HormusjJ*Dadabhai rejoined the lodge. 

This accession was however more than counterbalanced 
by four resignations and three* deaths, being of one sub- 
scribing member and two honorary members. 

The resigning members were Brothers Bomanji Din- 
shaw Petit, the Hon'ble Justice Sir N. G. Chandavarkar, 
Dr. M. R. Sethna, and Edulji Cowasji Jussawalla, and the 
subscribing member who left this world and, with it, the 
brethren ever to mourn his loss, was Brother Dr. Ismail 
Jan Mahomed, who was affiliated from Lodge Islam eleven 
years before. 

He was of good report and had during his membership 
laid a strong hold on the good-will and regards of the 
brethren, who recognised in him a genuine man and a 
true Mason who loved and served his countr'ymen as he 
did his Brother-Masons. All who knew him appreciated 
his sterling worth and always admired him. He died on 
28th January 1902 and in his memory a special Lodge 
of Sorrow was held on 21st February following at which 
the customary service was performed and a suitable 
oration paying a due meed of praise and a tribute to his 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 307 

memory was delivered by Brother P. C. Sethna. Brother 
Dr. Ismail was at his death Past Grand Warden of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India, and the Grand Lodge and 
several daughter-lodges passed votes of condolence with 
Lodge Rising Star. 

The Honorary Members who died were Brothers Dossa- 
bhai Framji Karaka, C. S. I., and Rahimtulla Mahomed 
Sayani. Resolutions expressing grief at the deaths and 
condoling with the families of the deceased Brothers 
were duly passed. 

Attheend of the year the funds stood at Rs.13,477-11-11 
of which the charity funds amounted to Rs. 11,587-2-9. 

Brother P. N. Pleader was voted a Past Master's 
jewel at the installation meeting held on 13th Decem- 
ber 1902 and was succeeded by Brother C. H. Captain, 
previously duly elected to the chair unanimously by the 
brethren. 

1903. Brother Captain entered on his office in this 
the Diamond Jubilee year of the lodge and fully justified 
the choice the brethren had made. He evinced the sanie 
unflagging interest and zeal as had been shown by his 
worthy predecessors in advancing the happiness and 
welfare of the lodge, and promoting the best principles 
of the Craft. Two Brothers resigned, viz., Brothers 
Hormusji Dadabhai and P.D.Sett. But four new members 
joined, of whom two were affiliates and two initiates, viz., 
Brothers Nanabhai Hormusji Moss (Solicitor) and 
Byramji H. J. Rustomji were affiliated and Dhanjibhai 
Pestanji Sethna and Narotam Morarji Goculdas were 
initated- There was only one initiation, one passing, and 
one raising and the time not employed in working the 
degrees was usefully employed in lectures, one of which 
entitled " The Origin of the Third Degree" was given by 
Brother A. F. Unwalla and was so highly appreciated 
that it was resolved that it should be entered in the 
minute book. 



308 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The question of the location of the lodge library 
troubled some brethren this year and was accordingly 
discussed at a lodge meeting and then referred to the 
Standing Gommitte for final disposal, and that body 
resolved that the masonic books belonging to the lodge 
should be handed over to the Hall Committee with a 
request that a masonic library be established in the 
Freemasons' Hall, the lodge wishing that the other lodges 
would assist the scheme in the most suitable manner, and 
this resolution was adopted by the lodge. It appears 
that before this the Hall Committee were contemplating 
the equipment of the Masonic Hall with a reading room 
and library but were not able to do anything for want of 
funds at their disposal. After this they appointed a Sub 
Committee consisting of Brothers R. S. Brown, D. R. 
Chichgar, S. B. Salts, and Sorab K. Nariman to report 
as to the ways and means for carrying out the object, 
and they drew up a report in the following year. 

It was resolved again this year to revive the Funda- 
tor's Medal the original die of which had been lost. 
Attempts had also been previously made to revive the 
medal and one of the original medals which belonged to 
the late Brother Nowroji Nanabhoy Framji was obtained 
as a loan from his widow through her son Mr. Limji 
Nowroji Banaji and sent to England to Messrs. George 
Kenning with the object of getting another die struck 
therefrom. The estimates were obtained and the medal 
lent was in due course returned to the custody from 
which it came but the die was not struck and no further 
medals were got out. The subject again vexed some of 
the members and again therefore a resolution was passed 
for reviving the medal. 

The charity funds received this year the following two 
donations for which the donors were duly thanked: 

(1) Rs. 500 from Surgeon-Major Cowasji Sanjana in 
return for aid rendered by the lodge in former years to 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 309 

a member of his family and (2) Rs. 500 from Brother 
Captain on the day of his retirement from the Eastern 
Chair as an endowment in the name of his father. 

At the end of the year after taking into account 
Rs. 1,040 disbursed in charity, the charity funds amounted 
to Rs. 12,171-8-11 and the general funds to Rs. 1,813-9-1 
and the number of members was 64 against 63 at the 
commencement of the year. 

Rs. 100 were as usual devoted to the Scottish Benev- 
olent Association of India. 

Brother Captain was on relinquishing office voted 
a Past Master's jewel which he so well merited. The 
lodge now completed its sixth decade. 



CHAPTER XXXVI. 

1904. Brother Maneck R> Sethna was the Worshipful 
Master in 1903-4. He set to work right earnestly and took 
up questions which had been discussed but left undisposed 
of in previous years. The first thing he did on assuming 
office was to make a laudable effort to revive the Jamshedi 
Naoroze Masonic Festival, which had been in abeyance for 
over four years, and resolutions were passed on the recom- 
mendation of the Standing Committee that the lodge 
should take the initiative in holding the festival on the 
occasion of the Vernal Equinox and that the Masters, Past 
Masters, Wardens, and Secretaries of the different native 
lodges should be requested to form themselves into a 
committee for the purpose of inaugurating the festival, 
and that all expenses of the festival should be defrayed out 
of subscriptions. He was helped in his efforts by Brothers 
K.R. Cama and Jivanji Jamsetji Mody but the response to 
the movement was not hearty and the matter was dropped. 

The old records of the lodge next attracted the atten- 
tion of the Right Worshipful Master and the question of 
housing and locating them and keeping them in order 
was discussed and the office of Brother P- C. Sethna it 
was resolved should be a safe repository for them. 
Brother M. R. Sethna found the records, it is stated, in a 
heap lying scattered and in disorder and he sorted and 
arranged them in regular order. It must have been a 
work of great labour and he deserved the best thanks of 
the lodge for having done it. 

Next an old Founder's Medal was purchased by the lodge 
from a Brother M. C. Hiramanek for Rs. 30 and was sent 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 311 

to Messrs. George Kenning & Sons of 196, 197, and 198 
Aldergate St., London, E- C., with a request 'to them to 
furnish an estimate for casting a new die and of the 
price of a new medal. The estimate arrived and was in 
due course accepted at 10-10 and new medals were 
ordered out and came in the following year. Thus was 
the Fundator's Medal revived after several years. 

There were three iniiations, three passings, and three 
ra'sings during the year and four new members joined, 
viz., Kavasji Dadabhai Hormusji Dubash Rustomji 
H. J. Rustomji, and Dinsha Dorabji Romer (Solicitor) who 
were intitiated, and Brother Dadabhai S. Munsif, who 
was affiliated. Brother Haji Mahomed Mehdi Malek-o- 
Tujar, the ex-governor of Bushire, rejoined the lodge but 
for a short time only, for within five months he resigned; 
Brother Pestanji Cowasji Sethna also resigned. 

Brother Kabraji died on 25th April and a special Lodge 
of Sorrow was held on the 7th May following, at which the 
customary service was performed and resolutions were 
passed. Brother K, R. Cama delivered a very able and 
impressive oration on the occasion. Brother Kabraji 
was above all an enthusiastic Master during the twelve 
months he had governed the lodge, for the records show 
that every time the brethren met they were specially 
exhorted to practise and not to preach only the excellent 
precepts inculcated by Freemasonry, and in the working 
of degrees he was strongly of opinion that the same, and 
especially the third degree, should be accompanied by 
music in order to render them so much the more attrac- 
tive and interesting. He was himself the Honorary 
Organist of the lodge (a post for which he was well fitted 
by reason of his own musical talents) for some years 
since the office was established, and helped materially at 
the Jamshedi Naoroze Masonic festivals and the musical 
entertainments held in connection with them, and in no 
small degree himself and by his daughters, who also aided 



312 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

him, contributed to the success of the festivals. His was 
a loss the lodge could ill afford. He was Grand Junior 
Warden at the time of his death, and Brother Bustom 
K. R. Cama was appointed by the Grand Lodge to fill his 
place during the rest of the year, and at the request of 
the Grand Lodge was obligated as such in Lodge Rising 
Star. 

Mr. R. H. J. Rustomji's election was the subject of a 
rather warm discussion. On the summons convening the 
meeting at which he was to be balloted for, his residence 
was not specified, but at this date, the lodge Bye-laws did 
not require any such specification. When the ballot was 
about to 5e taken, Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama 
asked that it should be adjourned till the summons was 
amended by the residence of the candidate being specified, 
which he said ought to have been done, and in support of 
his views he quoted passages from Chamber's Patons 
Freemasonry and its jurisprudence (p. 78). As the 
candidate was generally known to come from Kurrachee 
Brother Cama also contended that it was not right for 
the lodge to initiate him when there were four lodges in 
Kurrachee, especially as he was, according to his informa- 
tion, on a short visit to Bombay and was not a resident of 
the place, and supported his arguments by quotations 
from the same author at pp. 65-6 which laid down that a 
candidate should apply to a lodge near to his place of 
residence so that all proper inquiries could be made, but, 
at the same time, he stated that no express law on the sub- 
ject was to be found either in the ancient landmarks or 
in the old constitutions and that its positive sanction as a 
law in any jurisdiction must be found in the local enact- 
ments of the Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction. He also 
quoted from p. 13 of the same book a passage stating that 
no lodge could interfere with the business of anotherlodge, 
and this he. said was undoubtedly an ancient landmark 
founded on the great principles of courtesy and fraternal 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. Bi>2 S.'C. 313 



kindness, the very foundations of the institution. He 
had, he said, no personal objection to the candidate but he 
wanted to make his own position clear and would retire 
from the meeting if the ballot was still proceeded with. 

.Brother Phiroze C. Sethna, who supported the applica- 
tion for initiation, pointed out that in the absence of any 
Bye-law of the lodge or of the Grand Lodge requiring a 
candidate's residence to be specified on the summons, the 
action of the lodge was quite justified, and urged that the 
candidate was as much a resident of Bombay as of Kur- 
rachee, as he had place of business and abode in both 
places and lived in Bombay some part of the year and 
should be balloted for. Brother Cama was not convinced 
by the argument and still contended that any Bye-laws 
which were not in accordance with the articles laid down 
at large in Freemasonry were inoperative. The rest of 
the brethren were opposed to his views and he thereupon 
retired from the meeting and the ballot was then taken. 

The particular Bye-law which related to the proposal of 
a candidate as also the usual declaration made by him 
were after this duly altered by his residence being also 
required to be stated along with his age and occupation. 

Brother the Honourable Mr. P. M. Mehta, C.IE., 
received the honour of Knighthood from His Majesty 
the King-Emperor this year and the lodge passed by 
acclamation a special congratulatory resolution which was 
duly conveyed to and suitably acknowledged by him. A 
surprise visit was paid to the lodge by the Ceremonial 
Sub-committee of the Grand Lodge at a regular meeting, 
and the Grand Secretary wrote to the Right Worshipful 
Master thereafter as follows ; 

l< I am directed by the Ceremonial Sub-committee, of 
which there were two members present at the meeting of 
your lodge on the 6th instant, to congratulate you and 
your office-bearers on the excellence of your ^degree work 
as witnessed on that occasion, The Committee were glad 

40 



314 HISTORY OF LODGE' &1SING STAR 

to see the traditions and prestige of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India " so ably maintained, and wish it every 
success/' 

The greatest event of the year however was the 50 
years' masonic jubilee of! Brother K. R Cama. It was an 
event which not only concerned the lodge but was an 
unique event in the history of Freemasonry in India. Our 
veteran mason completed fifty years of a subscribing 
membership and career fraught with most honourable and 
useful masonic work on 24th August 1904, and the lodge, 
before the happy day arrived, determined to celebrate it 
in a fitting manner. Brother Cama was present at the 
meetings of the Standing Committee and took part in the 
deliberations of that body on the subject, and when a grand 
banquet in his honour was proposed he expressed himself 
against the idea and the brethren had to drop it. He, 
disdaining all show and desiring that something should be 
done which would be of permanent benefit to the Craft, 
suggested out of his genuine and deep-seated love for it 
that the event should be celebrated by issuing a jubilee 
memorial volume on masonic subjects, and the suggestion 
was adopted by the lodge, and the Secretary, Brother 
Jivanji J. Mody, was requested to edit the volume, which 
he willingly undertook to do. The lodge also held an 
emergent meeting on 24th August, which was open to all 
Masons, and passed the following resolution : 

" The Lodge Rising Star of Western India records its 
sense of gratification at the fact that one of its members, 
Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama, has this day 
completed the fiftieth year of his masonic life. This lodge 
congratulates itself and congratulates the Right Worship- 
ful Brother on this auspicious occasion. 

The fact of a paying member completing his fifty years 
of masonic life is an unique event in the masonic history 
of India. It is very gratifying to note that Right 
Worshipful Brother Camu has been an exemplary Mason, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.'C. 315 

regular in his attendance, attentive to his duties, useful to 
the Craft in general and to this lodge in particular, loyal 
in observing the virtues preached by the Craft, and zealous 
to uphold the prestige of masonry as an useful institution. 
The lodge is therefore proud to count a brother like Right 
Worshipful Brother Cama among one of its dutiful, 
valued and useful sons. It prays that the Grand 
Architect of the Universe may spare him long and endue 
him with health of body and vigour of mind to serve 
more faithfully than ever the Craft in general and this 
his mother-lodge in particular and to be useful to his 
fellow-brethren to the honour and glory of the Most 
High." 

In placing the resolution for acceptance the Right 
Worshipful Master Brother M. R. Sethna gave a short 
and concise account of Brother Cama's masonic career 
and paid a fitting tribute to his disinterested and zealous 
labours in the cause of Freemasonry and referred to him, 
and rightly so, as the kk Pillar of Strength " of Lodge 
Rising Star, to whom all brethren looked for support in 
their difficulties. It appears from the account that after 
this worthy Brother became Master of the lodge he was 
also steadily attracting attention in the Provincial 
Grand Lodge, for in 1863 he was Provincial Grand 
Steward, in 1864 Grand Secretary, in 1866 Grand Junior 
Warden, in 1867 Grand Senior Warden, in 1868 Substi- 
tute Provincial Grand Master, in 1876 Honorary Depute 
Grand Master and then Grand Master Depute of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India. He thus attained the 
highest masonic honour ever bestowed upon an Indian 
in the Craft but it was not in attaining high and respon- 
sible posts and performing the routine duties attached to 
them that Brother Cama took delight, but it was in 
acquitting himself creditably and usefully to the Craft 
that he always centred his energies. While he was Grand 
Secretary he suggested the establishment of! the Grand 



316 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Committee with a view to increase the strength and 
efficiency of the Grand Lodge and his suggestion was 
adopted and he became himself a member of the Grand 
Committee and continued as such till the day of his 
death. 

In 1865 while he was still Grand Secretary the Grand 
Lodge passed a code of Bye-laws upon its being pointed 
out by Brother Cama that) it had none. Great trouble 
was taken by him in compiling the Bye-laws and since 
then he has been a member and the president of. the 
Bye-laws Committee. At a Grand Lodge meeting held 
on 25th June 1869 it was the proud privilege of Brother 
Cama as the first Indian and a Parsi to preside over the 
brethren in the lodge in his capacity of Substitute 
Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, and 
when he vacated that post the Grand Lodge passed a 
resolution recording the valuable services he had till then 
rendered to Scotch Freemasonry in India which was 
conveyed to him engrossed on vellum. 

While Grand Master Depute, Brother Cama was in 
charge as Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in 
India for a few months while the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master Sir Henry Morland was away from India. 

It also appears that Brother Cama was, prior to 1879, 
made by the Grand Master an honorary member of the 
Grand Lodge with all the benefits of a full member with 
the object that the constitution should not be deprived of 
the benefit of his great experience and knowledge, as he 
gave the most carefull attention to the many subjects, 
often intricate and difficult, that came up before the 
body. 

He and Brother John Y. Lang were also appointed a 
Sub-Committee in 1879 to devise a better mode of keeping 
the Grand Lodge accounts so as to secure a better check 
than was possible under the then existing system and 
they formulated a scheme which met with approval. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 317 

Brother Cama had also had the unusual honour of 
being- the first Indian Grand Superintendent of Scottish 
Royal Arch Masonry in India, being re-elected to that 
office three times in succession at the end of every five 
years. 

It was his sterling unbroken services, for help render- 
ednot only to Lodge Rising: Star, but to the Craft in 
general that the lodge desired to commemorate the 
event by celebrating his masonic jubilee. The 24th of 
August 1854, when Brother Cama's knock at the door of 
the lodge was happily responded to, was indeed one of 
the luckiest days for the lodge, for as the address of 
the Right Worshipful Master at the emergent meeting 
of 24th August 1904 showed, it brought within it and the 
brotherhood in general, one, who, it might be truly said, 
above all, prized honour and virtue as his best possessions 
and showed how noble and excellent an institution Free- 
masonry is. Congratulatory messages and greetings 
were received before and at this emergent meeting 
from several individual Masons, Lodges, and Chapters 
which all breathed of the most fraternal feelings of love, 
esteem, and regard for our beloved Brother, and compli- 
mented the lodge on possessing him as its most valuable 
asset. 

Brother Cama, submitting to the demand of the oc- 
casion, denied himself the right to attend the emergent 
meeting, and the resolution was conveyed to him in writing 
and he duly acknowledged same by a letter in which he, 
inter alia, wrote as follows : 

" Your lodge's prayer, that I may be enabled by 
Grace to be useful more than ever to the lodge 
during the very short period I may be permitted 
to live, has my heartiest echo, for it has always 
been my delight and profit to be regular in my 
attendance so that I may be enabled on each 
occasion to give to my heart the noble and 



318 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

benign lessons which its work inculcates on all 
who give a willing and devoted attention to the 
masonic precepts with which every degree is 
replete. May the lodge continue to. spread 
the invaluable tenet of the fatherhood of God 
and brotherhood of man; that every Mason 
may be enabled to hope to participate in the 
work of the Grand Lodge above when he has 
passed through sublunary probation and gained 
the passport to the portals of that Sublime 
Lodge." 

An address was to be presented at the same time that 
the resolution was passed, but the presentation was, at 
the desire o,f Brother Cama, postponed till the completion 
of the jubilee volume. 

His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Lamington, 
G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., Governor of Bombay and Pro. District 
Grand Master E. C., was installed as the Grand Master 
of all Scottish Freemasonry in India at the annual con- 
vocation of the Grand Lodge held on 1st December 1904, 
under a Commission issued by the Honourable Charles 
Maule Ramsay, Grand Master Mason of Scotland, on 4th 
August 1904. On that occasion. His Excellency unveiled 
the marble bust of Bro. D. R. Chichgar, which was a 
part of the testimonial subscribed for by the members of 
the Fraternity on the occasion of the completion of the 
Masonic Hall. The bust was located on the first landing 
of the main staircase, which prominent place it still 
occupies. The effigy is a remarkably good likeness of 
our worthy Brother and the following is the inscription 
on the pedestal on which it rests : 

" The Honourable Right Worshipful Brother 
Darasha Ratanji Chichgar (Khan Bahadur, J. P.) 
Past Grand Master Depute, S. C., Honorary 
Senior G. W., E. C., Honorary Secretary. Free- 
masons' Joint Hall Committee." 



OF WESTERN INDIA Afo. 342 S.C. 319 

" A tribute by the Freemasons of Bombay and its 
territories for help in the erection of this Hall 
and other valuable services to the Craft for 
quarter of a century." 

The year closed with 66 members on the roll and a 
fund of Rs. 15,087-1-3, of which Rs. 2,145-5-8 were to 
the credit of the general account and Rs. 12,941-11-7 
to the credit of the charity account after deducting a 
large sum disbursed in charity during the year. A Past 
Master's jewel was voted to Brother Maneck R. Sethna 
and the usual donation of Rs. 100 was made to the 
Scottish Benevolent Fund. 

1905. Brother A. F- Unwalla occupied the chair 
in 1904-5 and his regime was as successful as that of 
his predecessors. To all questions that came up for dis- 
cussion before either the lodge or the Standing Commit- 
tee, he applied his legal acumen arid common sense with 
the result' that the solutions were on all occasions 
acceptable to the brethren and he always exercised great 
discretion and moderation. The Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master, Lord Lamington, was made an Honorary 
Member of the lodge and Right Worshipful Brother Sir 
Lawrence H. Jenkins, who was already an Honorary 
Member, and was at this time Honorary Member of the 
Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, was 
presented with the Burne's Medal in appreciation of his 
services to the Craft. 

Three new members were admitted, viz., Brothers 
Dhunjibhai H. J. Rustomji ( an affiliate ) and Messrs. 
Phirozesha Bomanji Petit and Ahmed Currimbhai Ibhra- 
him ( initiates ). Brothers Nowrosji Pestanji Vakil and 
Hormusji M. Chichgar resigned and Brother Ratansha 
Dadabhai died. The last named Brother, during the years 
he was a member of the lodge, filled some of the side 
offices and participtated in all movements that promoted 
or tended to promote the welfare of the lodge and the 



320 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

happiness of the brethren. He was a familiar figure not 
easily to be forgotten. By his courteous deportment, 
genial and affable manners and accommodating nature he 
had endeared himself both to the young and the old, in 
the lodge room as in the outer world, and his untimely 
death when he was in the very prime of life, was a 
distinct loss to the lodge which duly recorded in the 
minutes its deep sense of grief and sympathy with his 
sorrowing family and with Brothers Shapurji Sorabji and 
Nowrosji Hormusji, his near relations and members of 
the lodge. 

There were three initiations, one passing, and one 
raising during the year, and some useful lectures about 
" The General Assumption about Freemasonry " and 
" The History of Freemasonry '' were delivered by 
Brother J. J. Mody. 

The affiliation fee was this year raised from Rs. 75 
to Rs. 150. 

A revised edition of the book of constitutions and the 
laws of the Grand Lodge of Scotland was issued this year, 
and in order to bring the lodge Bye-laws into accordance 
with same a Sub-Committee consisting of the Right, Wor- 
shipful Master and Brothers K. R. Cama, D. R. Chichgar, 
RustomK. R. Cama, Pestanji M. Kanga, and Sorab Cow- 
asji Hormusji (Secretary) was appointed to revise them. 
Brother M. C. Murzbanwas appointed by Government the 
High Sheriff of Bombay for the ensuing year, and a 
special vote of congratulation was passed complimenting 
this worthy Brother, the next, oldest subscribing member 
of the lodge after Right Worshipful Brother K. R, Cama, 
on the honour conferred upon him. 

Brother Currimbhai Ibhrahim received the very high 
honour of Knighthood from our beloved Sovereign His 
Majesty the King-Emperor, which was personally con- 
ferred upou him by His Royal Highness the Prince of 
Wales, who was then in Bombay in the course of his 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 31>2 B.C. 321 

Indian tour. As is well known the distinction came to Sir 
Currimbhai in recognition of the munificent gift made 
by him of the princely sum of Rupees Three Lacs, in 
honour of the visit of His Royal Highness the Prince of 
Wales and his Royal Consort to India, as a contribution 
towards the Prince of Wales Museum, inaugurated by 
Bombay to commemorate the same visit. This was only 
a further instance of Sir Currimbhai's benevolent nature 
and philanthropy and the lodge felt justly proud in having 
such a brother as one of its members. An emergent meet- 
ing was held at which a congratulatory resolution was 
passed, and this worthy Brother's virtues and charities to 
masonic and non-masonic bodies were appropriately 
acknowledged and praised. In honour of the occasion 
Brother Fazulbhai Meheralli Chinai, a former member of 
the lodge, made a donation of Rupees Fifty to the Charity 
Funds of the lodge and later on Sir Currimbhai himself 
made a donation of Rupees Five Hundred to the Charity 
Funds. 



41 



CHAPTER XXXVII. 

1906. The Most Worshipful the Grand Master Lord 
Lamington paid his first official visit to the lodge at 
its installation meeting held on 15th December, when 
Brother D. F. Wadia was installed in King Solomon's 
Chair. It was at this meeting that His Excellency most 
graciously presented to Right Worshipful Brother Sir 
Lawrence H. Jenkins the Burne's Medal on behalf of the 
lodge and also presented the Past Master's jewel to Bro- 
thers R. M. Chichgar, M. D. Doctor, P. M. Kanga, P. C. 
Sethna, F. J. Patel, P. N. Pleader, and C. H. Captain, which 
though duly voted to each of them on his retirement from 
the chair had not yet been presented. The General Funds 
of the lodge now amounted to Rs. 2,104-3-6 and the 
Charity Funds to Rs. 15,328-14-1, after taking into 
account Rs. 1,000 and upwards expended in charity 
during the year, the usual donations to the Scottish Bene- 
volent Funds and Grand Lodge of Scotland Charity 
Funds. The Most Worshipful the Grand Master was 
pleased to express his very great satisfaction at the 
prosperous condition of the finances and the harmony 
prevailing amongst the brethren, and in referring to his 
honorary membership, said he personally highly valued 
the privilege of being an honorary, member of the lodge, 
which he said was the premier native lodge in India, and 
hoped that he would be able to pay more visits to the 
lodge . 

The year 1905-6 began with 66 members on the roll. 
Brothers Byramji H. J. Rustomji and Dhunjibhai H. J. 
Rustomji resigned; Brother Bejanji N. Kapadia died; and 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 323 

Brother D. A. Taiyarkhan's name was removed, for default 
in payment of lodge dues. Resolutions were duly passed 
recording the grief of the lodge at the death of Brother 
Kapadia and sympathising with his family. 

Brother H. M. Chichgar, who had resigned during 
the previous year, paid his debt of mortality on 30th 
December 1905 and in his memory a special Lodge of 
Sorrow was held as during his 31 years' membership he 
had rendered many useful services to the lodge, 
notably in the matter of the Nowrosji Nanabhai Trust 
Funds. Brother P. C. Sethna delivered an oration after 
the funeral service was performed in which he depicted 
the deceased Brother's character and dwelt at length on 
his masonic career and the obligations under which he 
had laid the Lodge, and resolutions were passed regret- 
ting the death and condoling with the family of the 
deceased and also with the Brothers Chichgar, mem- 
bers of the lodge, and Brother Nanu Narayen Kothare, 
the deceased's partner in his profession. 

The numerical strength of the lodge however did not 
in the end decrease, for five new members were admitted, 
viz., Messrs. Rustomji Peroshaw Bharucha, Rustomji 
Maneckji Dossabhai Wadia (the Right Worshipful Mas- 
ter's brother), Abdul Hussein Abdul Currim and Jehangir 
Cooverji Coyaji, who were all initiated, and Brother 
Abdul Kadir A. Ebrahim, who was affiliated. The degree 
work consisted of four initiations, six passings and five 
raisings, and an interesting lecture on "An Inquiry into 
the Traditional or Legendary Hisitory of Freemasonry" 
was delivered by Brother J. J. Mody. 

The sub-committee, appointed in the previous year to 
revise the by-laws, began work this year- Brother P. C. 
Sethna was added thereto by the Right Worshipful 
Master. It held about 12 sittings at which the existing 
by-laws were discussed and overhauled, and new by- 
laws were prepared which after passing through the 



324 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Standing Committee were adopted and passed by the 
lodge, amended in some respects, at an emergent meeting 
held on 17th November 1906. 

Before the by-laws were passed, two new offices were 
created this year, viz., those of Chaplain and Assistant 
Director of Ceremonies and appointments had also been 
made to these offices, but when the new by-laws were 
passed the Chaplain's office only was retained and that 
of the Assistant Director of Ceremonies was abolished. 

By the new by-laws the fees were raised from Rs. 300 
to Rs. 400 for the three degrees, at which figure they at 
present stand. 

An Affiliated Member was for the first time obligated 
this year and a form of the obligation was annexed to 
the by-laws. 

Brother C. H. Captain, in the course of his travels 
this year paid a visit to Lodge Benjamin B. French 
No. 15, Washington, IT. S. A., and that lodge was pleased 
to notify the visit by a letter which also contained its 
cordial invitation to the members of the Lodge Rising 
Star happening to be in that great Continent to visit it. 
The letter was duly replied to by the Right Worshipful 
Master who therein extended the invitation of this lodge 
to the members of Lodge Benjamin B. French, when 
happening to travel in India. Brother Captain after his 
return spoke of his reception by that lodge as having 
been very warm and cordial. 

The foundation stone of the Sir William Moore Oper- 
ation Theatre at the Sir Jamsetji Jijibhai Hospital was 
laid with masonic rites on 25th September 1906, by Most 
Worshipful Brother His Excellency the Right Honourable 
Lord Lamington, Governor of Bombay and Grand Master 
of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, and the lodge 
was represented in this function. 

Brother D. F. Wadia laid down office at the installation 
meeting held on 1st December 1906, and the number of 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 325 

members on the roll was then 67 and the funds were 
Rs. 16,721-5-4, of which Rs. 13,921-0-0 stood to the 
credit of the charity account, to which on his retirement 
he made a donation of Rs 500-0-0 ( in Government 
paper) to be credited in an account in the name of 
his father the late Mr. Framji Dossabhai Merwanji 
Wadia, the income thereof only to be devoted for 
purposes of charity. During the year Rs. 1,225-0-0 
were disbursed in charity. Right Worshipful Brother 
Colonel Robert Hall Forman represented the Grand 
Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India at this 
installation meeting in his capacity of Substitute Grand 
Master with the Grand Lodge officers and was pleased 
to express his great gratification at the prosperous 
condition of the lodge and the peace and goodwill 
which prevailed therein, and in alluding to the posi- 
tion it held in the Craft said that in his opinion " the 
Risen Star was now a more appropriate name than 
Rising Star, for the star that was rising in 1843 had 
firmly maintained its position in the masonic firmament 
during its long existence of over 60 years and was 
occupying a premier position amongst native lodges 
in Western India." The lodge could not be too thank- 
ful to this worthy Mason for his kind utterances on 
this occasion. 

The question of equipping the Masonic Hall with 
electric light and fans was now mooted and was under 
consideration of the Hall Committee. The lodge voted 
at this meeting as its first contribution towards the cost 
of the fittings the sum of Rs. 100- The usual donations 
to the Grand Lodge of Scotland Annuity Fund and the 
Scottish Masonic Benevolent Association in India were 
also made at this meeting, and a past master's jewel was 
voted to the retiring Master. 

1907. Brother D. C. Sethna succeeded Brother D. F, 
Wadia in the Master's chair. 



326 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The Cama Masonic Jubilee Volume, edited by Brother 
J. J. Mody, was now ready. A special presentation volume 
neatly got up and handsomely bound in morocco was 
prepared and the presentation was made by the lodge to 
Brother K. R. Cama at the hands of Most Worshipful 
Brother His Excellency Lord Lamington, Grand Master 
of All Scottish Freemasonry in India, at a meeting held on 
12th March 1907, which he had very graciously attended 
for the purpose, responding to the request of the lodge in 
that behalf as the brethren were anxious to see honour 
paid to the recipient thereof through the highest masonic 
functionary in the land. Along with the Memorial 
Volume, an address prepared by a small Sub committee 
consisting of the Right Worshipful Master, the Immediate 
Past Master, and Brother J. J. Mody was also presented 
to Brother Cama signed by the Master, office-bearers 
and members of the lodge and fixed in a beautiful and 
artistic frame. (See Appendix S.) 

The Most Worshipful the Grand Master while making 
the presentation recounted the various services rendered 
to the Craft by Brother K. R. Cama and held him up as a 
model Freemason and expressed his great pleasure at 
having had the opportunity of making the presentation to 
a worthy Brother. 

The Jubilee Volume consists of 18" papers on differ- 
ent masonic subject's, two of which are from the pen of 
the Editor himself and the rest by different members of 
the Fraternity. It also contains appreciation of Brother. 
Cama's past services by several brethren ( one of them 
being our Honorary Member, Right Worshipful Brother 
W- H. Barrow,) and the address that was delivered 
by Right Worshipful Brother Manek R. Sethna at the 
meeting held on 24th August 1904, tto celebrate the 
Masonic Jubilee. Brother Barrow's paper, it may be 
noted, contains reference to the initiation of the first 
Hindu Bhagwandas Beneram in the lodge. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 327 

At the very end of the volume is also published a letter 
addressed to Brother Cama by Right Worshipful Brother 
Robert K- Inches, the Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh 
(Mary's Chapel) No. 1, conveying the congratulations of 
that lodge on the attainment of his jubilee and accompa- 
nied by a list of the Masters of the lodge from 1599 
to 21st February 1905 and a copy of its by-laws. The 
Lodge of Edinburgh is the oldest masonic lodge in 
existence, being descended according to tradition from 
the craftsmen brought from Stratsford by David, first 
King of Scotland, in 1128, for the purpose of building 
Holyrood Abbey, and it possesses, it is said, the oldest 
minute extant, dated " July, 1599." King Edward in 
1870 when Prince of Wales honoured that lodge by 
becoming an Affiliated Member. 

This year the lodge lost a promising member in Bro- 
ther A. N. Pleader. During the six years that he was a 
member he had, following in the wake of his worthy bro- 
ther, shown a lively interest in several questions that had 
come up before the lodge, and had life been spared to him 
he would have been of use to the lodge. He was very 
genial and pleasant in his intercourse and had made 
himself quite popular. But the fate, that must sooner 
or later overtake all, overtook him in the very blossom of 
his life at the early age of 43 years on 15th March 1907. 
The lodge duly recorded its sense of grief at the sad and 
untimely death. 

Mr. Ratanji Hormusji Cooper was the only new mem- 
ber admitted this year. The degree work consisted of one 
initiation, one passing, and two raisings, but the spare time 
was not only usefully but was very profitably spent in lec- 
tures given by Brother Sorab C. Hormusji on " The Tracing 
Board " and by Brother J. J. Mody on " King Solomon's 
Temple and the Ancient Persians," and " Charity." These 
lectures were highly interesting, and the one on charity by 
Brother Mody was so highly appreciated by the brethren 



328 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

that it was resolved that it should be printed and circu- 
lated among the members and that a special day should 
be appointed on which there would be no lodge meeting, 
when Freemasons from all lodges should be invited and 
the lecture should be repeated by Brother Mody. Brother 
K. R. Cama characterised the lecture as a very unique one, 
and paid a high tribute to the learning shown by the lec- 
turer. Brother Mody always took delight in entertaining 
the brethren whenever he could get the opportunity of 
doing so, with instructive discussions on masonic subjects 
and his efforts showed great industry and deep search at 
the fountain sources. He was an useful member but the 
lodge was no longer to profit from him. He resigned 
shortly after he delivered his last lecture, and the lodge 
accepted the resignation with great regret. Brother Jehan- 
gir B. Petit also resigned and Brother Jamsetji N. Un- 
walla was, in pursuance of a resolution of the Grand Lodge 
in that behalf, suspended " for belonging and refusing to 
sever his connection with a spurious body working under 
the jurisdiction of a body styling itself Supreme Council 
Universal Mixte de Droit Humaine, of Paris, under the 
terms of the conference between the Grand Lodges of 
England, Scotland and Ireland. " 

1908. Brother Dr. D. C. Sethna vacated office on 14th 
December 1907, when Brother Dr- K. B. Shroff was in- 
stalled as Master. On this occasion again the lodge was 
officially visited by Right Worshipful Brother Colonel 
Forman, but this time as Substitute Grand Master in 
charge as Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in 
India, as the Most Worshipful the Grand Master Lord 
Lamington had before that to leave suddenly for England, 
resigning his post of Governor of the Presidency owing to 
the serious illness of Lady Lamington. A fund had been 
started for Defraying the cost of an oil-painting of Lord 
Lamington to be hung up in the Masonic Hall and at this 
meeting the lodge voted its share thereto. The customary 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3^2 S.C. 329 

donations to' the Scottish Benevolent Association and the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland Annuity Fund were also made 
and Brother Sethna was voted a Past Master's jewel. 

The in-coming Master on the very threshold of his 
government made a donation of Rs. 500 (in Government 
paper) to the Charity Funds of the lodge to be credited 
in an account in the name of his deceased niece Mrs. 
Bhikhaji Bomanji Raghi, the interest only to be devoted 
to charity. The General Funds after all expenses made 
amounted to Rs.2, 501-1 1-1 and the Charity Funds, 
exclusive of the last donation but after deducting 
Rs. 1,275 disbursed in charity during the year, totalled 
Rs.14,40 7-1-10. The number of members was 64. 
There was an addition of two during the yea;r, namely 
Dr. Bomanji Byramji Darabsett, Deputy Health Officer, 
Bombay Municipalty, and Dr. Dossbhai Rustomji Bardi, 
F. R. C. S. (Edinburgh), but the lodge again had to suffer a 
loss by the death of Brother Dossabhai Dadabhai Allbless 
on 24th May 1908 and of Brother Surrosh K. R. Cama. 
Brother Allbless was the very type of a Pars! of the 
orthodox school, yet, held to the most modern ideas, 
was severely plain and unassuming and was possessed 
of a very kind and generous nature and was candid and 
scrupulous, honest in his intentions and acts, and every 
inch a true Mason. He practised, unobserved and to a 
large extent, the principles of charity and benevolence. 
The lodge duly passed resolutions expressing its grief at 
the death and condoling with the deceased's family. 

The degree work was two initiations, one passing, and 
one raising, and lectures on the tracing boards were deliv- 
ered by Brothers P. C. Sethna and S. C. Hormusji and a 
lecture on kk Gleams and Sidelights of Freemasonry " by 
Brother D. R Chichgar which were much appreciated. 

Brother J. J Mody sent in August of this year 50 copies 
of the Cama Masonic Jubilee Volume and two sums of 
Rs. 42-5-0 and Rs, 16-8-0, aggregating Rs.58-13-0. . 

42 



330 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The lodge made a further contribution this year of 
Rs.400 to the Electric Fans and Lights Fund and subs- 
cribed Rs. 50 to the Hyderabad Relief Fund started in 
Bombay for affording relief to the people in Hyderabad 
CDeccan) who had suffered by the floods there- 

A complete register of the members of the lodge commenc- 
ing from 15th December 1843 (the date of its establish- 
ment) to the date of the installation meeting held on 15th 
December 1908 was compiled by Brother D. F. Wadia (the 
author of this History) and handed by him to the lodge 
at that meeting. Two donations of Rs.500 each were made 
to the lodge at the same meeting, one by Brother Phiroze 
C. Sethna and the other by Brother Dr. D. R. Wadia, who 
was installed as Master for the succeeding year. 

Brother Sethna 's endowment was associated with the 
name of his late father Brother Cursetji Rustomji Sethna, 
who from the early sixties was a member of the lodge for 
over a quarter of a century, and was made to perpetuate 
his memory and upon condition that the corpus should 
always remain intact and the interest only should be used 
for charitable purposes. Brother Wadia's donation was 
made to perpetuate the memory of his paternal grand- 
father the late Brother Ardeshir Cursetji Wadia ( who 
was the first Indian member initiated in the Lodge in 
the year 1844 and was for several years the Treasurer of 
the lodge) and upon like condition. 

The lodge was at this Anniversary Meeting paid his 
first official visit by the Most Worshipful Brother Colonel 
Forman, who was now the Grand Master, with his Grand 
Lodge Officers, and before this was honoured by him by his 
nominating Brother Rustom M. Chichgar, Honorary Sub- 
Grand Master. The year closed with 62 members on the 
roll and the financial condition was as prosperous as before. 
The General Fund was Rs. 2,306-15-7 and the Charity 
Account stood at Rs. 14,845-0-6 after taking into account 
Rs.1,400 and odd disbursed thereout during the year- 



CHAPTER XXXVIII. 

1909. In the year 1909 there was an addition of five 
members, viz., Mr. Behramji Cowasji Batliwala and 
Dr. Jehangir Munchershaw Meherhomji (who were 
initiated), Brother Rahimtulla Currimbhoy Ebrahim, 
(of Lodge Imperial Brotherhood) and Dr. Sorab Kaikhus- 
roo Engineer (late of Lodge Mary's Chapel of Edin- 
burgh, Scotland) who were affiliated and Brother B. H. 
J. Rustomji who rejoined- With Brother Rahimtulla the 
lodge now has five sons of our worthy Brother Sir" 
Currimbhoy Ebrahim, Bart., as members. But this 
accession was entirely counter-balanced by the resigna- 
tions of Brothers Sir Dinshaw Maneckji Petit, Bart., and 
Pestonji Cowasji (Solicitor) and the deaths of Brothers 
K. R. Cama, Fakirji Dinshaw, and Gulam Husein Allana. 
The death of Brother K. R. Cuma was a great blow to the 
lodge and it will be years before it will recover from it. 
This venerable Brother died after an unique Masonic 
career of 55 years, during which period he was an 
Active and Subscribing Member of the lodge, and full .of 
years and honours. In word, act, and deed he evinced a 
strong desire and unmistakable tendency to a general 
good understanding and exhorted the brethren in this 
lodge, as he did in the Craft generally, to consecrate 
themselves to the maintenance of peace, good-will, use- 
fulness and efficiency, and to render undeviating obedi- 
ence to the Chair, and spoke out fearlessly to anyone 
who disregarded that principle. 

He imparted Masonic light to the brethren which, let us 
hope, will burn brightly to the glory of his name for ever 



332 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

and enable them always to tread in the path of rectitude 
and propriety. In the previous portion of this history 
references have been made to the period of his Mastership 
and the lessons that he then and always thereafter inculca- 
ted and the example he set of strict discipline, regular 
attendance, and high Masonic ideals, as also to the high and 
responsible posts enjoyed by him in the Provincial Grand 
Lodge and Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry, in 
India up to Depute Grand Mastership and to the honour 
(which has rarely, if it has ever, fallen to the lot of an 
Indian) of being in charge of Grand Lodge while Substitute 
Grand Master and to preside at its meeting. His advice 
and assistance in the Provincial Grand Lodge and Grand 
Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India were always 
considered valuable and esteemed accordingly. He was 
also at his death Past' Honorary Grand Junior Warden of 
the Grand Lodge of Scotland, Past Honorary Depute First 
Grand Principal of the Grand Chapter of Scotland, and 
Past Grand Superintendent of Royal Arch Masonry in 
India. He was a persevering and unwearied champion of 
projects intended to promote benevolence and charity and 
laboured long in the cause of Masonry equally as he did 
in matters of the outer world, and invariably practised 
what he preached and never contented himself with lip 
professions but with a kindly heart was known to aid by 
his private purse the objects which he favoured and 
supported by his presence. He exercised a considerable 
influence over the thought and culture of the day and 
turned to advantage every circumstance that education, 
talent and station could bestow without a tinge of vanity 
or a particle of self-esteem, and with a fairly attuned 
mind did his duty manfully and courageously and with a 
singular honesty of purpose, not craving for popular gaze 
or applause but always imbued with a deep sense thereof. 
In later life he was naturally labouring under disad- 
vantages due to. the weight of years, but still he showed 



WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S'C. 333 

the vigour and strength of youth in all he did, and though 
a profound scholar was always in search of further know- 
ledge like a student, and the cultivation of the perspective 
faculties which to the end of his days he was possessed 
of. He was an ardent advocate of literature, arts and 
sciences, was a -great oriental scholar and lectured and 
wrote numbers of books on various subjects, including 
religion, and was for a very large number of years and 
up to the date of his death either the President or the 
Secretary or Member of the Managing Committee or in 
some way or other actively connected with a considerable 
number of educational, religious, benevolent and other 
institutions, and by dint of his knowledge, acquired by a 
sound education and ripe experience, ever usefully exerted 
himself towards the promotion of their welfare and 
development. To the end of his life he was a great friend 
of the poor and the helpless and formed and maintained 
solid and honourable friendships which death alone 
dissolved. 

In the lodge he was a regular and punctual attendant 
at all meetings whether of the General Body or the 
Standing Committee, and he kept himself in evidence till 
the breath of life departed. Without the least fear of 
death overtaking him, he met his fate even in harness, 
for, it is known that on the morning that he died he was 
preparing to leave home to attend his duties as an Hono- 
rary Magistrate when suddenly he fell and lay prostrate, 
never to rise again. 

The news of his death filled every heart with deep 
and genuine regret, more so his brethren in the Craft and 
most of all the members of this lodge, for in their case 
it was at once felt as if an indispensable guide had gone 
and the greatest and safest beacon-light tkey always look- 
ed to for safe passage had disappeared. The large as- 
semblage that was witnessed at his funeral bore eloquent 
testimony to his sterling worth. Meetings after meetings 



334 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

were held for months succeeding his decease by various 
public and private associations and bodies, and even a 
public meeting of the citizens of Bombay was held to pay 
a fitting tribute to his memory, which was presided over 
by no less a personage than His Excellency Sir George 
Clarke, the Governor of Bombay, at which it was unani- 
mously said that the deceased was really a great and good 
man, and itwas resolved that an Oriental Institute should 
be founded with public subscriptions to perpetuate his 
memory. 

But in the inner circle of Freemasonry a testimony 
as great, if not greater, was borne to the merits of our 
departed Brother, at the instance of the greatest Mason 
in the land, namely, Right Worshipful Brother Colonel R. 
H. Forman, Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India. Soon after his death a circular was issued 
under the order of the Grand Master deeply deploring 
it and the loss caused thereby and placing Grand Lodge 
and all the daughter-lodges in mourning up to 30th 
September 1909, and a Special Funeral Grand Lodge 
Meeting was also held on 20th September 1909, in 
his memory, which was presided over by the Most Wor- 
shipful the Grand Master and at which a very large 
number of brethren under both tne constitutions attended 
to, show their last mark of respect for our much lamented 
Brother. The Most Worshipful the Grand Master in the 
course of his address on that occasion very truly said that 
" hhe memory, the loyalty and the example of our worthy 
Brother would never be forgotten, and that his blameless 
life was at once an incentive to emulation and an assu- 
rance that all was well with him and that this generation 
of Freemasons in India would never see his equal." A 
resolution was also passed by the Grand Lodge placing on 
record "its deep sense of the loss sustained in the death 
of the deceased Brother and its abiding gratitude for 
the unselfish and earnest Masonic work done by him 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 5-C 335 

throughout the fifty-five years in which he was connected 
with the Craft." 

The Most Worshipful the Grand Master besides doing 
the honour of holding a Special Funeral Grand Lodge 
also took the initial step towards perpetuating our Bro- 
ther's memory in two ways, (i) b'>y a fund styled "The 
Cama Memorial Fund " to be subscribed for by Lodges, 
Chapters and Individuals and to be handed over to the 
Scottish Masonic Benevolent Association of India to be 
administered by it ; and (ii) by putting up a memorial 
tablet in the Freemasons' Hall. 

The Fund is an accomplished fact and the tablet has 
also been erected. 

Letters were also received from several lodges and 
brethren expressing their sympathy in the loss sustained 
by the lodge. 

In view of the higher honour to the deceased of a 
Grand Funeral Lodge the lodge denied itself the melan- 
choly duty of holding a Special Funeral Lodge in memory 
of Brother K.R. Cama which it would otherwise have done, 
but at a Regular Meeting held on 4th September 1909, it 
resolved that as a mark of respect to the deceased, the 
ordinary business of the meeting should not be trans- 
acted, and passed resolutions recording the loss caused by 
the death of such an esteemed and high Mason to the 
Craft generally and the lodge in particular and for go- 
ing into mourning for three months and sympathising with 
his family. A very appropriate sermon in which the ster- 
ling qualities of the deceased Brother were depicted was 
delivered by Brother Darasha Chichgar and a resolution 
was also passed that a sum of Rs. 1,000 be set aside from 
the Charity Funds of the lodge as an endowment in his 
name, and that such endowment be supplemented by do- 
nations of the individual Members of the Lodge and that 
the income of the Fund be utilized for purposes of charity 
to Masons and education of the children of Masons. 



336 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

With the object of further perpetuating his memory 
the brethren resolved that whenever they met at the 
festive board they should drink to his memory in solemn 
silence. 

Such was Brother K. R. Cama, the second man and 
Mason after Brother Maneckji Cursetji who did all he 
could for Freemasonry and did it well and heartily. The 
following lines most appropriately applied in his case : 
"To say well is good, but to do is better, 
'Do well' is the spirit and 'say well' is the letter, 
If 'do well' and 'say well' were filled in one frame, 
AH were one, all were done, and got were all the gain." 

Brother Cama was one of the Trustees of the Lodge 
Funds and also a member of the Freemasons' Hall Com- 
mittee on behalf of the lodge, and these places rendered 
vacant by his death have since been filled by Brother 
Rustom K. R. Cama. (For the Grand Master's letter to 
the Lodge anent Brother Cama's death and reply see 
Appendix T.) 

The degree work done during the year was two ini- 
tiations and an equal number of passings and raisings and 
the year closed with sixty-two members on the roll and 
a total fund of Rs. 18,549-5-11, of which Rs. 15,783-10-11 
stood to the credit of the Charity account. At the instal- 
lation meeting held on 15th December 1909, Brother 
Darasha Bezonji Mehta was installed as the Right Wor- 
shipful Master for the next year, 1910. 

1910. In all twelve meetings of the General Body, in- 
clusive of the 67th anniversary meeting, and eleven meet- 
ings of the Standing Committee were held this year and 
there were one initiation, one passing and one raising. 
Two men-liters died, namely Brother W. L. Harvey (who 
was an Honorary Member) and Brother Dadabhai S. 
Munsiffna. Dr. Ardeshir Cowasji Turner, Assistant 
Chemical Analyser to the Government of Bombay, was the 
only member initiated. The Charity Funds increased by 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S-C. 387 

Rs. 1,000, being Rs. 500 contributed by the -Right 
Worshipful Master and Rs. 500 contributed by a 
respected member of the lodge in memory of the 
late Brother Munsiffna which have been added to 
the endowment fund associated with the name of Brother 
K. R. Cama. 

Two congratulatory resolutions were passed during 
this year, one congratulating Brother Sir Currimbhoy 
Ebrahim on the munificent gift of Rupees Four Lacs 
to a proposed College of Science and the other on 
his having received a Baronetcy from His Majesty the 
King-Emperor. 

The lodge also had the pleasure of passing votes con- 
gratulating Brothers Dr. Tehmulji Bhicaji Nariman and 
Fazulbhoy Currimbhoy Ebrahim on their being appointed 
Members of the Legislative Council of His Excellency the 
Governor and Brother Kajiji on his being appointed to be 
the Prothonotary and Admiralty and Testamentary Re- 
gistrar of the High Court of Bombay. 

His Most Gracious Majesty King Edward VII, Pro- 
tector of the Craft and Patron of Scottish Freemasonry, 
died on 6th May 1910. At a meeting held on the follow- 
ing day at which all notified business was suspended, the 
lodge passed a resolution recording this most melancholy 
event with the sincerest regret and deepest sorrow. It 
also went into mourning for six months along with the 
Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in India and 
all daughter-lodges under the orders of the Most Wor- 
shipful the Grand Master. 

The inscription on the In Memoriam Tablet of Brother 
K. R. Cama was very kindly referred by the Grand Master 
to the lodge for its approval and was settled between 
them so as to incorporate therein certain suggestions made 



338 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

by the lodge, and it has since been erected and runs as 
follows: 

In Memoriam. 

Right Worshipful Brother and Most Excellent Com- 
panion 

KHUVSHEDJI RUSTOMJI CAM A 

Honorary Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, 
Past Grand Master Depute, Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freema- 
sonry in India. 

Honorary Depute First Grand Principal, Grand Chapter of 
Scotland. 

Past Grand Superintendent, Royal Arch Masonry in India under 
Scotland. 

Past Master and for 55 years' an Active Member of Lodge Rising 
Siar of Western India No. 342 S. C. 
Born, November 11, 1831. 

Initiated, 24th August 1854 in Lodge Rising Star. 
Hied, 20th August, 1909. 

" Well done, thou good and faithful servant." 

/?-. /. P. 

The lodge has also placed a medallion of the deceased 
Brother over the tablet with the concurrence and approval 
of the Grand Master, the cost thereof laving been defray- 
ed out of subscriptions made by the members. 

An Honorary Membership was conferred and the 
Burnes' or Fundator's Medal was presented by the lodge 
this year to a distinguished Mason, he being no other 
than Most Worshipful Brother Colonel Forman. This 
Brother, a staunch Mason, having a 27 years' previous re- 
cord, had, when Substitute Grand Master, in which capacity 
he was, on Lord Lamington's departure from the Indian 
shores, in charge as Grand Master, established an indis- 
putable claim to the Grand Mastership with which he was 
ultimately by common consent endowed. After his eleva- 
tion to the exalted office he delivered an address from the 
throne of the Grand Lodge which dealt elaborately with 
the dignity and status of Freemasonry in India and the 
universality, teachings, and ethics of Freemasonry and 
struck, as is well known and recognised beyond doubt, a 
key-note to t'he true understanding of the tenets and ordi- 
nances of our ancient and noble Institution and is in 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S-C 339 

itself a land-mark which can be most profitably approached 
with conscious and unhesitating steps with a view to 
the attainment of the final goal and the true and faithful 
discharge of one's masonic obligations and thereby his 
duties as a man. His subsequent addresses, utterances, 
and discourses in Grand Lodge and daughter-lodges and 
appearing in the Indian Masonic Review have further 
shown how indefatigable and ardent he has been in his 
endeavours in the furtherance of the best interests of 
Freemasonry in this country and all that appertains 
thereto, and that in him the Scottish Craft had not a titu- 
lar figure-head but a genuine man and master in the real 
sense of the words. With him there is no substitute for 
thorough earnestness of work and he has justly earned the 
popularity and esteem which are now his best possessions. 
This lodge has been fortunate enough in attracting his 
attention and meriting his kind consideration and 
favour. Brother P. C. Sethna was made this year Substi- 
tute Grand Master and another deserving member, namely 
Right Worshipful Brother Meherally Devraj Master, \vas 
at the Grand Lodge convocation held on 26th November 
1910 made Honorary Substitute Grand Master. Brother, 
A. M. Kajiji, also a member of this lodge, was at the same 
convocation installed as Grand Senior Warden. The lodge 
was, indeed, paid a very high compliment by the Grand 
Master accepting the Honorary Membership and the 
Fundator's Medal, and \vell may the lodge be proud to 
own him as one of its own, who will always have a place 
for it in his heart. The Installation Meeting was held on 
16th December 1910, when Brother Darasha Mehta va- 
cated the chair after a year's happy and prosperous rule 
according to the unanimous approbation of the Brethren, 
and Brother Sorab C- Hormusji was installed as the 
Master for the succeeding year. At this meeting Most 
Worshipful Brother Col. Forman was presented with 
the Burnes' Medal by the retiring Master, 



340 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Brother D. F. Wadia presented to the lodge also at 
this meeting a bound type-written volume of this history, 
and the lodge while accepting it passed the following 
Resolution, viz.: 

"That the offer made to the lodge by Right Worshipful 
Brother D. F. Wadia to make over to it the manuscript 
of his " History of Lodge Rising Star of Western India 
No. 342 S. C. (1843-1910)" be accepted with grateful 
thanks, that the lodge desires to place on record its 
sincere and lasting appreciation of the loyalty and attach- 
ment of Right Worshipful Brother Wadia to his mother- 
lodge in rescuing from oblivion the unique history of its 
rise and progress and thereby raising the lodge in the 
estimation of the masonic world to its true worth ; further 
that the lodge publish the History at its expense and 
present to Right Worshipful Brother Wadia an edition 
de luxe with this Resolution embodied therein and also 
present him with a Historian's Jewel commemorative of 
the event." 

1911. This year there was an accession of 4 members 
viz., Mr. Hormusji Ratanshaw Dadabhoy (Merchant)., 
Mr. Kaikhus^o Manecksha Taliyarkhan (Pleader of the 
High Court, Bombay) Mr. Dinshaw Dadabhai Daruwalla, 
L.C E., A.M.I.C E. ( Acting Drainage Engineer to l.lie 
Bombay Municipality ) and Dr. Maneckji Pirosha Kera- 
walla, M. D., F. R. C. S. Edinburgh of whom the first 
named two are lewuses. Two members resigned, namely, 
Brother B S. Shroff and Abdul Husein Abdul Currim, 
and two members, namely, Brother Ardeshir Framji 
Unwalla (who was also a Past Master) and Brother 
Behramji H. J. Rustomji died. A lodge of sorrow was 
held by the lodge in Brother Un walla's memory and a 
Brother contributed Rs. 50 to the Charity Funds of the 
lodge also in his memory. The degree work done during 
the year consisted of 4 initiations, 2 passings, and 2 
raisings. In all 12 meetings of the general body and 



340 (a) 




The Author's Jewel. 



340 (6) 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 34 i 

13 meetings of the Standing Committee were held. A 
fund was started this year in appreciation of the services 
rendered by Right Worshipful Brother Colonel R. H. For- 
man to Freemasonry and for retaining a fitting memorial 
of same and presenting a souvenir to him, and the 
lodge contributed Rs. 50 thereto. During the year 
Rs. 1,415 were disbursed in charity and at the end of the 
year the funds after all disbursements and the usual 
donations to the Grand Lodge of Scotland Annuity Fund 
and the Scottish Masonic Benevolent Association stood 
at Rs. 20,314-15-2, being Rs. 2,894-6-0 in general account 
and Rs. 17,420-9-2 in charity account. Brother the 
Honble. Dr. Temulji Bhicaji Nariman was this year ap- 
pointed to the high offic? of Grand Master Depute, 
A.F.S.I., and Brother D. F. Wadia was invested as Hono- 
rary Grand Senior Warden, A.S-F.L, by the Most Wor- 
shipful the Grand Master at a special communication of 
the Grand Lodge held on 4th March 1911, in recognition of 
his labours in compiling this history. TJie marble medal- 
lion which was erected by the lodge in memory of the 
late Right Worshipful Brother K. R. Cama was unveiled 
on llth November 1911 by Brother T. B. Nariman on 
behalf of the lodge in the presence of a very large and 
distinguished gathering of Freemasons. It is a faithful 
likeness of that eminent Brother and surmounts the 
Memorial Tablet put up last year in his memory and 
occupies a prominent position in the Masonic Hall, A 
photo of the medallion is at p. At the installation meet- 
ing held on 15th December 1911, Brother D. F. Wadia 
was presented with the Historian's Jewel (which was 
voted to him last year) by the Substitute Grand Master 
on behalf of the lodge. A photo of the jewel is at pg- 

Brother Sorab Cowasji Hormusji wa& acknowledged ; 
by common consent to be an energetic and able Master 
who had discharged his duties in an eminently satisfac- 
tory manner and was unanimously voted a Past Master's 



342 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

jewel. With his retirement the lodge entered on the 
69th year of its existence under the Mastership of Right 
Worshipful Brother Nosherwan Piroshaw Dubash. 

To summarise what has been already stated in the 
briefest compass possible : The lodge was launched on 
its career and established chiefly for the reception of 
native gentlemen on 15th December 1843 in the year of 
Masonry 5843 with 27 leading men and Masons of the 
day, all (except one, viz., Brother Maneckji Cursetji) be- 
ing European members of Lodge Perseverance who had 
signed the memorable requisition for founding the lodge 
and most of whom were in the Civil, Military, Naval, and 
Judicial services of the Honble. the E. I. Company while 
some were connected with Commerce and Journalism. 
Brother Dr. James Burnes, the then Provincial Grand 
Master of Western India, who granted the warrant of 
dispensation, was the first Master and subsequently 
became its Honorary Master and later on its Honorary 
Master for life, and by his direction two more names 
were added to those of the requisitionists before the grant 
of the warrant, and nine more brethren who were affiliat- 
ed on the 1st Anniversary Meeting were in commemora- 
tion of the event admitted also as Original Members. 
The times were then unfavourable. The bitterest pre- 
judice, begotten of bigotry and false notions that 
Christianity was the moving spirit and the end and aim 
of Masonry, then prevailed and made the task under- 
taken one of the greatest difficulty. But the redoubtable 
Mason Brother Maneckji Cursetji who undertook it 
pushed it on disregarding ridicule, even hatred and 
contempt, and the movement attained the success which 
it so eminently deserved. By the time the sixth year of 
existence was reached it seemed there was no prospect of 
getting more native gentlemen as members than the 
lodge then already had and an ineffectual attempt was 
made to reconstitute it on the basis that it should be per- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S,C, 343 

mitted to initiate Europeans also. In 1856 the Lodge had 
reached a crisis in adversity for there was want of funds, 
want of members, and also want of harmony, and for a 
year no meetings were held. Then Brother Maneckji 
Cursetji was nominated the Master for 1857 and he ruled 
as such for three successive years and with his rule the 
clouds that temporarily threatened the prosperity of the 
lodge and had darkened its horizon disappeared and 
things were restored to more than a normal state of peace, 
prosperity, and tranquility. The lodge completed its 68th 
year of life on loth December 1911. 

It has had 430 members from the commencement till now, 
of whom 39 were Original Members, 193 have been Ini- 
tiates, 155 Affiliates or Joining Members, and 43 Honorary 
Members. Almost ail the Provincial Grand Masters and 
Grand Masters of All Scottish Freemasonry in India have 
been Honorary Members, and in former times some of the 
Provincial Grand Masters were also Affiliated and Voting 
Members. The lodge has also had the proud privilege 
of having on its roll of Honorary Members, Provincial 
Grand Masters of Bengal and Madras, the Secretaries of 
the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and English and Irish Lords 
and Peers and French Noblemen, Generals of the British 
Army, Commanders-in-Chief of the Indian Forces, and 
also no less a personage than His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Connaught, who still graces it. In addition to the Hono- 
rary Members outside the lodge it has up to now created 
as such fifteen of its own members on their retirement; 
in consideration of meritorious services rendered by them. 

The lodge has in selecting members (and the number 
of it is not large considering the length of life till 
now) acted on very cautious principles and admitted only 
those who have passed the searching and severe test of 
ability, respectability, and moral worth. It Js not to every 
one that has knocked tftat the door has been- opened but 
only to the best among them, as can be seen at a cursory 



344 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

glance at the Register of Members. Members of this 
lodge are men who have risen to be Members of the 
British House of Commons (namely, Bros. Dadabhoy 
Nowrojiand SirM.M. Bhownagri,K.C. I.E.), have attained 
the first citizenship of Bombay and become Presidents of 
the, Bombay Municipal Corporation and Town Councils 
and Standing Committees and High Sheriffs, have sat 
on the Legislative Councils of the Governors of Bombay 
and also of the Governors-General of India, have become 
Judges of the High Court of Judicature at Bombay and 
the Small Causes Court and also Presidency Magistrates, 
have rendered and are still rendering eminent services 
to their country and mother-land and have been and 
are men of light and leading like the Grand Old Man 
of -India, Sir P. M. Mehta, K.C.I.E., the late Bros. K. R. 
Cama, Nowroji Furdunji, (who was popularly and justly 
known as the Tribune of the people), Sorabji Shapurji 
Bengalee, Pestonji Hormusji Cama, Dossabhoy Framji 
Karaka, and others who in their different professions, such 

! as Law, Medicine, Science, and the rest and in trade and 
commerce and other walks of life have been and are 
shining lights and have distinguished themselves in 
various ways. 

Up to now, 1,287 meetings have been held, being 615 
regular meetings and 71 special extraordinary or emer- 
gent meetings of the General Body, 534 meetings of the 
Standing Committee and Sub-Committees, and 67 installa- 
tion or anniversary meetings. Of these the highest 

.< number of meetings, viz. 37, was held in the year 1906, the 
next highest, ciz., 34, in 1862, and the smallest number 
viz., 1, in 1856. In all there have been 193 initiations, 182 
passings, and 180 raisings. A modest beginning was 
made in the year 1854 in the way of inaugurating a 
Charitable Fund with Rs. 250 or so as the first total amount 
of subscriptions.. Off and on additions were made there- 
.tOrbut? it was not until by the Bye-laws it was laid down 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 4-32 S.C. 345 

in comparatively recent times that a certain proportion 
of the fees should he devoted in charity that any real 
advance was made. Thereafter the Charity Funds have 
steadily increased and at the present day they amount to 
Rs. 20,000 and odd, after taking into account about 
Rs. 40,000 to 50,000 disbursed in charity by this time. 

The lodge has struck two medals, one called the 
Burnes' or Founder's or Fundator's Medal, to comme- 
morate its foundation and Dr. Burnes' connection there- 
with, and the other called "The Jubilee Medal," to com- 
memorate the celebration of its 50 years' jubilee. The 
Burnes' Medal has been presented up to now to 30 bre- 
thren, seven of them being members at one time or ano- 
ther. Two of these medals in gold were presented to Bros. 
Dr. James Burnes and Cursetji Nusserwanji Cama. The 
rest were presented in silver. Our late beloved Sove- 
reign King Edward VII had graciously done the lodge 
the very high honour of accepting the Fundator's Medal 
while in Bombay in 1875 as the Prince of Wales, and an- 
other recipient (a member of the Royal family) who has 
paid the lodge a similar compliment is His Royal High- 
ness the Duke of Cannaught. The Earl of Dalhousie 
(once the Viceroy and Governor-General of India) 
Lord Elphinstone ( once the Governor of Madras) 
Lord Leigh, Dr. George Oliver, the eminent Histo- 
rian of the Craft, the Grand Masters of England, 
Scotland, and Ireland, the Duke de Gaze, the Most 
Venerable of the Grand Orient of France, their Royal 
Highnesses the Grand Masters of the Order in Holland 
and Prussia and the Princes of the Blood Royal of Persia 
were amongst others presented with the medal besides 
being made Honorary Members. The last presentation 
was in 1908 to Sir Lawrence Hugh Jenkins, the present 
Chief Justice of Bengal, before the lodge, presented 
it to the Worshipful the Grand Master, on 16th 
December 1910. 44 



346 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The Jubilee Medal has been presented since 1893 
when it was struck, only to two brethren, one in gold to 
the jubilee year Master Brother Framji Dinshaw Petit 
and the other in silver to a familiar figure in Freemason- 
ry, viz.. Brother C. D. Furdoonji. 

The lodge has, since the establishment of the Scottish 
Masonic Benevolent Association to 15th December 1911, 
subscribed to the funds thereof Rupees 2,000 and odd 
but has not taken any benefit thereout till this date. 

In the matter of the Masonic Hall the lodge has 
rendered very active and substantial assistance and has 
made a donation of Rupees 15,000, being the Nowroji 
Nanabhoy Trust Funds contributed by one of its members, 
bearing the name given to it, and also out of its funds 
and donations made by its ex-members and friends con- 
tributed another sum of Rupees 15,000 (fifteen thousand). 
Under one of the conditions on which the Nowroji Nana- 
bhoy Trust Funds were handed over, a member of the 
lodge nominated by it and then appointed by the Grand 
Master is always a member of the Hall Committee and 
the large Banqueting Hall is named "The Framji Cowasji 
Banqueting Hall." Brother K. R- Cama was such member 
representing the lodge till his death, and since then his 
son Brother Rustom K. R. Cama has filled his place. 

The members of this lodge have held high offices in 
the Grand Lodge, and Brothers K. R. Cama, M. C. Murz- 
ban, and D. R. Chichgar have rendered valuable and 
enduring services to the Grand Lodge which have been 
more than once cordially appreciated, as appears from 
its records. Brother Darasha R. Chichgur has also been 
Secretary of the Joint Freemasons' Hall Committee for 
nearly thirty years. 

As the outcome of the opposition of the then Lodge 
Perseverance Jo admitting Indian gentlemen within its 
portals, this lodge was founded and it has existed and 
flourished these sixty-eight years, and according to the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 347 

independent testimony of successive Provincial Grand 
Masters and Grand Masters of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India has held a premier position amongst native 
lodges. 

It has always maintained its own and been loyal to 
the Grand Lodge of Scotland and the Provincial Grand 
Lodge and Grand Lodge of All Scottish Freemasonry in 
India, and its relations as a daughter-lodge have always 
been very close and cordial with the Grand Lodge of All 
Scottish Freemasonry in India and its predecessors, and 
let us hope that it will continue on its onward career for 
years and years to come and maintain untarnished its 
reputation and place. 

The total number of members now borne on the Re- 
gister is 78, of whom 54 are Resident and 8 Non-resident 
and 16 Honorary Members. The 62 Resident and Non- 
resident Members comprise: 

(a) 4 Government and Railway Pensioners- 

(b) 4 Barristers-at-law. 

(c) 9 Solicitors. 

(d) 16 members of the Medical profession, 

some of whom hold high appointments in 
the Bombay Municipality. 

(e) Twenty-one Merchants and Mill-owners or 

Agents, most of whom are also large land- 
owners. 

(f) 2 in the Shipping trade, 
(flf) 3 Landlords. 

o 

(/&) Mn service. 
62 

Amongst the Honorary Members are the Most Worship- 
ful the Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry in 
India, His Royal Highness the Duke of Connaught, and 
Lords Sandhurst and Lamington, the Honble. Sir L. H. 
Jenkins, Chief Justice of Bengal, Dadabhoy Nowroji, 
the Honble. Sir P. M. Mehta, J. M. Cursetji, and Dr. 
Pollen. 



348 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 




APPENDIX A. 



GRAND 
LODGE OF SCOTLAND. 



TO ALL and SUN- 
DRY to whose know- 
ledge these presents 
shall come GREETING 
in GOD EVERLAST- 
ING Whereas upon 
the second day of De- 
cember one thousand 
eight hundred and 
forty-four a Petition 
was presented to the GRAND LODGE of SCOTLAND 
in name of P. W. LeGeyt, E. F. Danvers, W.A. Purnell, 
G. Buist, W. Simson, James Boyd, W. Wellia, H. Gibb, 
R. Brown, residing in Bombay and others PRAYING the 
said GRAND LODGE to grant a CHARTER of Constitu- 
tion and Erection in the usual from for holding a Lodge 
under th - name and title of THE RISING STAR OF WES- 
TERN INDIA and Proposing the persons after mentioned 
to be the first Office Bearers thereof, viz., R. W. James 
Burnes, K. H. P. G., Master of Western India, etc., etc., 
etc., to be Master ; P. W. LeGeyt, Past Master, A. Lark- 
worthy, Senior Warden ; H. Fawcett, Junior Warden, 
S. Compton, and W. Wellis, Deacons; M. Cursetjee, Secre- 
tary; J. Boyd, Treasurer. Which Petition with the requisite 
Certificates, therawith produced, having been duly con- 
sidered in GRAND LODGE assembled, they were pleased 
to ordain a charter to be issued in the terms under written 
KNOW ye therefore that the Most Worshipful the GRAND 
MASTER MASON of SCOTLAND and THE GRAND 
LODGE thereof have constituted, erected and appointed, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 349 

like as they hereby constitute erect and appoint the Mas- 
ter, Wardens and Brethren above named to be now and 
in all time coming a true and regular Lodge of free and 
accepted Masons under the name, style and title of THE 
RISING STAR OF WESTERN INDIA in Bombay and 
Appoint and Ordain all regular Lodges to hold and 
respect them as such, giving, granting and commit- 
ting to them, and those to be afterwards admitted 
Members of the said Lodge full power and authority 
to meet, assemble and convene as a regular Lodge ; 
and to enter Apprentices, pass Fellow Crafts, and 
raise Master Masons, upon payment of such compositions, 
for the support of their Lodge, as they shall see convenient 
but which compositions at their initiation shall not be 
under the sum of One Guinea AND with power also 
annually to elect and choose MASTERS, WARDENS, and 
other Office Bearers, recommending to the Brethren of the 
said Lodge to reverence and obey their Superiors, in all 
things lawful and honest, as becometh the honor and 
harmony of Masonry: AND the said Brethren becoming 
bound on no account to desert their own Lodge ; Nor 
upon any pretext whatever to make any separate or 
Schismatical meetings independent of the Master and 
Wardens, foir the time ; Nor to introduce any other orders 
of Masonry than those sanctioned by the Grand Lodge ; 
Nor to collect funds separate from the common-stock of 
their Lodge to the prejudice of the Poor thereof : AND 
DECLARING that the said Lodge and whole constituent 
members thereof now and in all time coming, shall by ac- 
cepting this present CHARTER'be bound in faithful alle- 
giance to the said Grand Lodge as HEAD of the Masonic 
body in Scotland AND shall be obliged to obey and pay 
due regard to all ACTS, Statutes and Regulations of the 
said GRAND LODGE already made and* enacted or here- 
after to be made and enacted for the utility, welfare and 
prosperity of Masonry; AND generally to pay and perform 



350 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

whatever is required from them for the, support; and dig- 
nity of the Grand Lodge : AND PARTICULARLY to ac- 
count and pay into the fund of the Grand Lodge, at least, 
the sum of four shillings and six pence sterling, besides 
the usual fee of ona shilling to the Grand Secretary 
and Grand Clerk for each member initiated in their 
Lodge from and after the date hereof : which sums they 
shall cause to be annually remitted to the Grand Sec- 
retary at EDINBURGH and at the same time transmit to 
him a list of the names of the MEMBERS initiated, in 
order that the same may bz recorded in the Books of the 
Grand Lodge : and THE BRETHREN of said Lodge shall be 
bound to record in the B--ooks of their Lodge (which Books 
they are hereby authorised and enjoined to keep) this 
present CHARTER, their own regulations and bye-laws, 
minutes of their whole procedure from time to time, so 
that the same may be better known and more easily 
observed by the Brethren, Subject always nevertheless 
to the review and control of the GRAND LODGE : And the 
said Brethren are hereby required to attend the whole 
General Meetings and Quarterly Communications of the 
GRAND LODGE, by their Representatives, being their 
Master and Wardens for the time, or by lawful proxies in 
their names (provided such Proxies be Master Masons of 
some established Lodge holding of the Grand Lodge) so 
that they by their said Representatives may act and 
vote in the Grand Lodge and be duly certiorated of the 
proceedings thereof: DECLARING the said Lodge's prece- 
dency in the Grand Lodge to be from the date hereof : 
AND for the more effectual preservation of these presents, 
the same are hereby appointed to be recorded in the 
Books of the Grand Lodge. 

GIVEN at the GRAND LODGE of SCOTLAND held in 
FREEMASONS' HALL in the CITY of EDINBURGH 
the second day of December, in the year of OUR LORD 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-four- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 351 

AND of LIGHT Five Thousand Eight Hundred and 
Forty-four. 

By the Right Honourable George Lord Glenlyon, John 
Whyle; Melville, Esquire, of Mount Melville, Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Master, and R. W. Substitute Grand 
Master, Sir Thomas Dick Lauder, Baronet, Senior Grand 
Warden, P. T. William Baillie, Esquire, of Polkemmel, 
Junior Grand Warden, William Alexander Laurie, 
Esquire, Grand Secretary, and John Maitland, Esquire, 
Grand Clerk. 
THOMAS DICK LAUDER, GLENLYON, Grand Master 

Senior Warden pro tern- of Scotland, 

WILLIAM BAILLIE, WHYLE MELVILLE, Sub- 

Junior Grand Warden. stitute Grand Master. 

W. A. LAURIE, Grand Secretary. 
J. MAITLAND, Grand Clerk. 



(APPENDIX B.) 

Calcutta, 16th March 1845. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I had the pleasure to receive your kind favour of the 
27th February, a few days, ago, and have now the 
pleasure of acknowledging it and of expressing my 
sincere thanks to the Right Worshipful Master, Wardens 
and Brethren of Lodge Rising Star of Western India, for 
the high honour they have conferred on me, in electing me 
an honorary member of the lodge, an honour which I duly 
appreciate, and am highly gratified by. 

Your Right Worshipful Master has truly represented 
me to you, as one interested in the welfare of the Craft 
and anxious for the success of your lodg, viewing its 
establishment, as I do, as a means of great good, in bring- 
ing into intimate contact and mutual appreciation worthy 
men, whom prejudice and habit had hitherto kept 
asunder, 



252 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

I trust that opportunities may occur, of which I shall 
gladly avail myself, of proving the interest I feel in the 
welfare of Lodge Rising Star of Western India. 

Allow me to reciprocate your expression of kindness 
and esteem and believe me. 

My dear Sir and Brother, 

Fraternally and Sincerely yours, 

F. W. BIRCH, 
S /. P :, R . . ft! .'. 

Mr. MANECKJEE CURSETJI, 

Secretary, Lodge " Rising Star of Western India." 



Scopwick Vicarage, June 24th 1845. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

The unequivocal testimony which jbhe Worshipful 
Master, Officers, and Brethren of the Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India have given of the approbation of my 
labours in behalf of the service of Freemasonry, by elect- 
ing me an honorary member of the lodge, is peculiarly 
gratifying to my feelings and I request that you will 
communicate to them my unfeigned thanks and grati- 
tude for the distinction which they have conferred upon 
me. 

I became attached to the Order at a very early age, 
and a more intimate acquaintance with its humanising 
principles have given me no reason to think that the time 
I have devoted to its study and development has been 
unprofitably bestowed. And the unqualified approval of 
many learned and judicious members of the Craft has 
assured me that my earnest endeavours to explain its 
doctrines and to disseminate its sacred truth have not 
been unproductive of solid and substantial good. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 353 

With fraternal regards to the members of your lodge 
both Native and European. 

Believe me, Dear Sir, 
Your faithful Brother, 

GEO. OLIVER. 
To 

MANE'CKJEE CURSETJI, ESQRE., 

Secretary, "Lodge Rising Star" of 
Western India. 



Bombay, 1st October 1840. 
My dear Sir and Brother, 

' The handsome compliment paid me by the Worship- 
" ful Master, Officers and, Members of the Lodge Rising 
" Star in the East, demands my sincere and continued 
" gratitude, and it is with feelings of the highest pride 
" and satisfaction I accept this distinguished mark of 
" their favour and brotherly love." 

" It is indeed an honour most gratifying, emanating 
" from a lodge where such practical proof exists of the 
" universally philanthropic character of our glorious insti- 
" tutian, acknowledging no other distinction among men, 
" save those devoted to virtue and integrity." 

Yours fraternally 

"On the Square" 
J. R. LAMART. 
Honorary Member, 
"Lodge Rising Star" in the East. 
BROTHER MANECKJEE CURSETJI, , 
Secretary, 

" Lodge Rising Star " 
in the East. 

45 



354 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Poona, 19th June 1846. 
Right Worshipful and Dear Brother, 

I had yesterday the greatest pleasure in receiving 
your letter of the 16th instant, in which you enclosed me 
an extract from the proceedings of a meeting of the 
Lodge Rising Star of Western India, held at Bombay on 
the 15th of this month, at which it was resolved that I 
should be elected an honorary member of it, and request- 
ed to wear its medal on all occasions of ceremonies. 

May I beg that you will have the goodness to take 
the first opportunity which may be convenient to the 
lodge and to yourself to express on my part the obliga- 
tion I feel under, for the great kindness which has been 
so flatteringly extended to me, and I must not omit to add 
how thankful I am to you for the part you have taken on 
this, to me, most gratifying occasion. 

Believe me to be, 

Right Worshipful and Dear Brother, 
Yours very Sincerely, 
THOS. Me MAHON. 



From 

BROTHER COLONEL BURLTON. 

Calcutta, 28th June 1846. 
My dear Sir and Brother, 

It is with feelings of peculiar gratification that I do 
myself the honour of acknowledging the receipt of your 
kind letter of the 16th instant annexing copy of a Reso- 
lution passed at a Meeting of the Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India electing me one of its honorary members. 
I beg you will do me the favour to assure your Right 
Worshipful Master as well as the Officers and Members 
of the Lodge tnat I gratefully feel and fully appreciate 
the compliment which they have been so kind as to pay 
me and that I shall be proud to wear its Medal on all 
Masonic occasions. I trust I may not be deemed presum- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 355 

ing, if I add that I hailed the first Rising of your Star 
with very great satisfaction and that I shall ever feel 
the greatest interest in its success, from the conviction 
which I cherish that the dissemination of the Principles 
and Privileges of our Order amongst the educated classes 
of the People of India (men of intelligence and integrity 
being of course alone admitted) will be productive of the 
greatest benefit to, eventually, a large number of good and 
true men who in their turn will, doubtless, reflect a lustre 
on the Craft by an adherence to its moral precepts and 
a practical display of its many virtues. With sincere 
wishes that such may be the good points of your lodge 
and with fervent aspirations for its long-continued 
success and prosperity. 

I remain, my dear Sir and B other, 

Very Sincerely and Fraternally yours, 
WILLIAM BURL'TON, 

P. Depute. P. G. M. of Bengal. 
To 

MANECKJEB CURSETJI, ESQRE. 

Secretary, "Lodge Rising Star" of Western India. 



From 

BROTHER SIR WILLIAM HARRIS, 

Dharwar, 10th July 1846. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I beg of you to convey to the Worshipful Master and 
worthy Brethren of the Lodge Rising Star, my grateful 
sense of the honour done me by the Resolution announced 
to me in your letter of the 15th ultimo. It is peculiarly 
gratifying to me to learn that the Medal Struck by the 
lodge in honour of our Most Worshipful and esteemed 
Provincial Grand Master has met with such universal 
approbation, and I beg to assure the Native Brethren 



356 HISTORY; OF LODGE RISING STAR 

who have in a flattering manner elected me to be an 
honorary member that I shall wear it amongst my most 
valued jewels on all occasions of masonic ceremony. 

I am, Dear Sir and Brother, 
Yours Faithfully and Fraternally, 
WILLIAM HARRIS. 

D. P. G. M. 
BROTHER MANECKJEE, CURSETJI, ESQRE. 



To 

THE SECRETARY .OF THE LODGE RISING STAR, BOMBAY. 
From 

DR. M. DE KIRWANG. 

13th July 1846. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

The honour which the Worshipful Master and the 
Brethren of the Lodge Rising Star have been pleased to 
confer upon me in affording me the title of an Honorary 
Member of the said lodge was too much unexpected and 
undeserved and is too much appreciated by me, that I 
should not have the desire of having it more evident to 
my own lodge. Consequently I beg leave to request of 
your kindness that you would have this title made author- 
itical for me under the form of a diploma, the possession 
of which I would consider as a new favour afforded. 

To enable you to draw it, I have to state that I belong 
to the Scotch Lodge of Paris No. 6 of Mount Senai in 
which I had the honour of being admitted as a member 
on the 20th day of June 1845. 

As I am about to leave this country by the next steam- 
er to Suez and perhaps shall not have any opportunity 
of meeting again the brethren in the lodge previous to 
my departure, I should feel much obliged to you if you 
would kindly express to the Worshipful Master and the 
brethren my best thanks and gratitude for all the kind- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 357 

ness and partiality they have displayed upon me, request- 
ing them at the same time to be well convinced that the 
lasting recollection of these favours shall always be the 
most gratifying to me in all the circumstances of my life- 
Now, Dear Brother, let me add the fervent expression 
of my best wishes for the happiness and prosperity of all 
the Brethren of the Lodge and may the Great Architect 
of the Universe bless you and every one of them. 

Allow me to enclose my modest offering to the poor and 
distressed. 

I remain, 

Yours faithfully, 
M. DE KIRWANG. 



London, 19th August 1846. 
From 

BROTHER CHARLES S. EVANS. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your very polite 
favour dated the 16th of June last together with a copy 
of the Resolution of the Lodge Rising Star held on the 
day previous conveying to me the gratifying intelligence 
of my having been unanimously elected an Honorary 
Member of the Lodge Rising Star of Western India. 

I request that you will be pleased to tender my grateful 
thanks for the honour thus conferred on me and assure 
the lodge that I shall be proud on all occasions of mason- 
ic ceremony to wear the medal presented to me. 

I remain, Dear Sir and Brother, 
Faithfully and Fraternally yours, 

CH*ARLES S. EVANS. 
To 

BROTHER MANECKJEE CURSETJI, 
Secretary, Lodge Rising Star of W. I. 



358 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ARBROATH, SCOTLAND, 

lltli September 1846. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I had the honour of receiving*your kind note dated 16th 
June, informing me that I had been elected an Honorary 
Member of the Masonic Lodge Rising Star of Western 
India. I have since received one of the beautiful Medals 
which I shall have great pride and pleasure in wearing 
on masonic occasions. When a suitable opportunity 
occurs, I beg, you will offer to the members of the Lodge 
assembled my warmest acknowledgments for the honour 
they have conferred on me, and to yourself personally 
for your kindness in communicating to me, I can only 
tender my best thanks. 

Although it may never be my good fortune to meet 
with any of the native gentlemen who are members of 
the Lodge, I can truly say, for I feel sentiment in my 
heart, that my fervent wishes for their happiness will 
ever be borne towards them. 

I have the honour to be, 
Dear Sir and Brother, 
Yours Faithfully and Affectionately, 
JAMES ANDERSON. 



Karachi, 10th January 1847. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I had great pleasure in receiving your note of the 17th 
December last from my friend Alii Akbar Bahadur inti- 
mating to me my having been elected a member of the 
Lodge Rising Star. Oblige me by offering to the Wor- 
shipful Master, Wardens, and Brethren of your Lodge my 
grateful thanks <for that honour. 

I have always taken a deep interest in the welfare of 
the Craft- It' is not only here where we see the Native 
of India, being with the white of England that Masonry 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 359 

presents herself, but in every transaction in a pure 
aristocracy of Morals totally independent and indifferent 
to distinctions in Society but into which all true-hearted 
men having secured a place, meet in reciprocal gratifica- 
tion without their love of assumption on the one side or 
loss of dignity on the other, linked together by the bond 
of brotherly love and charity. Our secrets have been 
kept inviolable from the creation of the world to this 
moment though all other Institutions have fallen. 

I will not lengthen this but wishing from the bottom 
of my heart every success and happiness to your Lodge. 

I am, Dear Sir and Brother, 
Yours Fraternally, 

" On the L " 

F. D. FORSTER, 

R. A. and Past Master, Lodge Hope. 



APPENDIX C. 

Bombay, 5th Novembsr 1849. 
Dear Sir and Brother Secretary, 

By command of the Right Worshipful the Provincial 
Grand Master of Western India I have the pleasure to 
acknowledge your letter of the 24th September addressed 
to the Past Grand Secretary Brother Winchester with an 
enclosure to the address of the Right Worshipful Master 
but ( apparently by mistake) without any signature 
attached thereto, and proceed to reply to the queries 
therein put regarding the proposed admission of a Parsee 
who offered himself candidate for admission into our 
Order. 

There is no objection to a Parses being^ admitted on the 
score of his creed. Parsees or other Natives who believe 
in one God, in the world to come, and in future reward or 
punishment according to deeds done in the flesh are un- 



360 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

questionably eligible provided they are in a respectable 
social position and possessed of a due sense of moral 
rectitude. 

In the Lodge Rising Star of Western India we require 
them to testify to those points before giving them the 
obligation in their application to be admitted as well 
as in answering the question they are obliged to reply 
before receiving the obligation which otherwise in itself 
differs in no respect to that given to our Christian 
brethren. 

They are obligated, however, on the " Zend Avesta " 
(the sacred book of Zoroaster) the scripture of the Par- 
sees, a copy of which I have the pleasure to transmit 
with a request that your Lodge will accept it as a token 
of my fraternal regard- 

I have it also in command from the Right Worshipful 
the Provincial Grand Master to forward copies of the 
correspondence which led to the erection of the Lodge 
Rising Star of Western India for the purpose of admit- 
ing native gentlemen into the Craft, and to observe 
that the principles therein laid down have been strictly 
maintained and the admission only given to those of 
unblemished integrity and acknowledged position in 
Society. 

The subject engrossed the earnest attention of our 
most eminent brethren in this quarter, who considered 
the step as one fraught with most important results 
either for good, or evil to Freemasonry, and we have, there- 
fore, continued to exercise the strictest scrutiny in the 
reception of candidates. This you will best understand 
when I inform<you that inclusive of myself, who am a 
Master Mason of French Creation, having been initiated 
at Paris, the Lodge Rising Star does not number more 
than (10) ten Native Brethren although it has been in 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 361 

existence nearly five years. I remain with sentiments of 
fraternal regards. 

Yours Faithfully, 

M. CURSBTJEE, 

Secretary to the P. G. M. for the Native 
Correspondence, and Senior Warden, 

Lodge Rising Star, Western India. 
To 

BROTHER THOMAS HOIROX, 

Secretary, Nilgheree Lodge. 



APPENDIX D. 

LODGE PERSEVERANCE, 
Colaba, 24th December 1861. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

With reference to your note to the Worshipful Master 
of this lodge, dated from the Lodge Rooms, 5 Grant 
Buildings, and intimating the intention of Lodge " Rising 
Star" to meet in these rooms, which are at present 
occupied by Lodge Perseverance, I am desired to ask by 
what authority you thus date your communications or 
summon meetings of your lodge to hold in our rooms 
without having previously communicated with and ob- 
tained the consent of the Worshipful Master of Lodge 
Perseverance to your so doing. 

I remain, Dear Sir and Brother, 

Yours very Fraternally, 

W. M. ELLES, 
Secretary, Lodge Perseverance. 

To 

MANECKJI CURSETJI ESQR. V 

Secretary, 
Lodge Rising Star. 

24 



362 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Villa Byculla, 25th December 1861. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter of last evening and refer you to the enclosed copy 
of the Resolutions and correspondence passed by and 
between the Lodge Perseverance, the Rising Star/and the 
Provincial Grand Lodge with the view to cementing on 
firmer footing the relationship that existed, and, unless I 
am very much mistaken, still exists between Perseverance 
and Rising Star of Western India, both working under 
one and the same authority, in one and the same rooms, 
and where they severally have their warrants deposited 
and hung up in frames. 

That no previous " consent " was ever before obtained 
or was at all thought necessary to obtain, for the meeting 
of the Lodge Rising Star in the Lodge Rooms from the 
Worshipful Master of the Perseverance since the construc- 
tion of the former, in 1844, 1 can confidently assert. All 
that was necessary to be done on the occasion of such 
meeting was for the Secretary of Rising Star to intimate 
to the Worshipful Secretary or Worshipful Master of 
Perseverance, the day and time of its meeting and this, 
to my certain knowledge, was invariably done. 

The Worshipful Master of the Lodge Perseverance 
was, as he told me, not aware of this until I mentioned 
the above circumstances to him and read the papers 
regarding the same a few mornings ago when he 
favoured me with a visit at my house. 

I may as well add that the privilege of holding its 
meeting in the Lodge Rooms was not accorded to Rising 
Star as a favour or without any consideration. The 
furniture in the Lodge Rooms was paid for in 1844 by 
Lodge Rising Star, Perseverance, and the Provincial 
Grand Lodge in certain proportions, and of which the 
quota borne by Rising Star was by far larger than the 
other two. The Star paid the quota of the Lodge rent 



OF WESTERN INDIA No.- 342 S.C. 363 

and expenses up to 1847, that is so long as its finances 
were in a condition to admit of the same. Since then 
the "Star " had little or no work. It met but once or so 
in a year at daytime, not night, for form sake. It was 
not called upon by, and did not pay to Perseverance 
anything under the circumstances just mentioned. But 
should the four candidates about to be balloted for, be 
elected, and initiated in the Lodge Rooms, Perseverance 
would, as a matter of right, be entitled to a moiety of our 
forthcoming fees ; in other words to no less a sum than 
400 Rupees out of 800 Rupees, though it may be for 
one day's use of the rooms, under the compact above 
adverted to. 

I beg also to add that the decorations which now adorn 
the Lodge Rooms were personal property of the Right 
Worshipful Brother Burnes, presented on his departure 
for the use of the Brethren working under the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland, that is, the members of the Provincial 
Grand Lodge, of Perseverance, of Rising Star, and of the 
Chapter. 

Thus you will observe that I had only acted in pursu- 
ance to the past practice in not asking formal consent 
from the Worshipful Master of Perseverance without, in 
the least, intending to be discourteous to him. 

Should the , v orshipf ul Master of Perseverance, however, 
feel dissatisfied with this explanation or if he feels in- 
disposed to consent to continue the arrangement as hither- 
to acted upon by his several predecessors, I shall, on being 
so informed, forthwith recall the summons and substitute 
another altering the place and time of our meeting. Let 
an immediate answer come to this, as we have little time 
for arranging our meeting. 

I am, Dear Sir and Brother, with fraternal regards. 

Yours Faithfully, 
MANECKJI CURSETJI, 

Secretary. 



364 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

P. S, Since writing the above I received a note from 
the Worshipful Master of Perseverance, and under the 
circumstance therein stated, I am directed to enclose you 
our amended circular for the information of the members 
of Perseverance extra members of the Lodge, and you 
will observe therefrom that we shall meet on the 27th, at 
6 P.M., at the Baboola Tank House instead of the "Lodge 
Rooms." 

MANECKJI CURSETJI. 



My Dear Cursetji, 

When your note reached my house to day I was absent 
and when your messenger came afterwards for a reply I 
was unfortunately on the point of going to parade so that 
I could not answer it, I requested our Secretary to reply 
to your circular, for our records do not contain the 
information you were good enough to read to me last 
Sunday morning, and it is advisable, I think, that we 
should have a copy of it'. Times have much altered since 
1846 and, of course> we have not been unaffected. I 
question very much indeed whether the present members 
of Perseverance will deem the former understanding 
binding on them, the more particularly as it would appear 
that Rising Star has paid no fees. In fact it was consi- 
dered defunct or it would have received a portion of the 
Rs. 500 left by Lord Dalhousie for distribution amongst 
the lodges in Bombay - However, there will be plenty of 
time to discuss all these points hereafter. 

I should have mentioned to you that we cannot spare 
our Lodge Rooms on Saturday for they are in course of 
preparation for our Ball. We do not meet on that day, 
but may probably meet on the 7th January, if not, cer- 
tainly on the 12th, our usual day. 

Our party is liot quite limited to the Brethren, but as 
much so as we can possibly manage, and I fear the 
Committee will issue no more invitations. You should 



OF WESTERN INDIA No: 342 S-C. 365 

have subscribed and then no doubt some cards would have 
been granted. Several of the Brother-guests have been 
refused on the plea that we would admit no more. 

Yours Sincerely, 

ASHBURNER. 



24th December, 9 P.M. 
My dear Ashburner, 

Not knowing where Brother Elles is residing I send 
the enclosed unsealed to you answering an official com- 
munication from your Lodge, and than what is mentioned 
in the enclosures I have nothing to add in reply to your 
note of last night, I received this morning. 

Yours Sincerely, 
MANECKJI CURSETJI. 



LODGE ROOMS, COLABA. 

8th January 1852. 
Worshipful Sir and Dear Brother, 

Various causes have hitherto prevented a reply being 
before this time forwarded to a letter from Brother 
Maneckji Cursetji, Secretary to Lodge Rising Star, dated 
25th ultimo, to the address of Brother Elles, Secretary to 
the Lodge Perseverance, over which I have the honour 
to preside. I much regret the delay which has occurred, 
but it was unavoidable. I deem it advisable to reply to 
the letter in question myself, in order to assure yourself, 
your Wardens, and the rest of the Brethren of " Rising 
Star," how desirous the Brethren of Perseverance are, 
that the friendly relationship which has hitherto existed 
between the two lodges should be preserved. 

With this intimation and to avert yie possibility of 
your being ever again disappointed in obtaining the use 
of our Lodge Rooms I would suggest the psopriety of the 
Worshipful Master of " Rising Star '' fixing on the days 



366 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

of the meeting of that Lodge, in previous communication 
with myself or the Master for the time being of " Lodge 
Perseverance" so that the two Lodges may not each fix 
on the same evening for their meetings. 

Connected in an intimate degree with the cordial 
reciprocal good understandings between the members of 
the two Lodges is that of several of the Brethren of the 
" Rising Star " being ex-officio, extra members of " Per- 
severance " and vice versa. In order, therefore, that the 
Resolution passed by the Brethren on the 3rd March 1845 
may be acted upon in future, I shall esteem it a favour if 
you will forward me at your convenience a list of such of 
the members of "Rising Star '* as were on your Lodge rolls 
at the time of the Resolution, alluded to, being passed. 

I avail myself of this opportunity of begging you 
will do me the kindness of directing the Treasurer of 
Lodge Rising Star to pay over to me the moiety of the 
receipts of your lodge which have accrued since last pay- 
ment. In calculating the arrears I propose crediting 
"Rising Star" with Rupees 83-5-4, being its half of 
one-third share of Rupees 500, which was deposited by 
the most noble, the Brother Lord Dalhousie for the 
purpose of Masonic Charity in the hands of Lodge Per- 
severance and which with this appropriation will have 
been divided between "Lodge Saint George ", " Lodge 
Rising Star," and the "Charitable Fund of Perseverance." 
With every fraternal regard I beg to subscribe 
myself, Worshipful Sir and dear Brother, 

Sincerely yours, 
G. ELLIOT ASHBURNER, 
Master of Lodge Perseverance. 
No. 351. 
To 

The Worshipful Master of 

Lodge Rising Star, No. 342. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 367 

Bombay, 18th January 1852. 
Worshipful Sir and Dear Brother, 

I have much pleasure in acknowledging the receipt 
of your letter of the 8th instant. The earnest desire I 
feel and know the members of Rising Star feel to main- 
tain the friendly relationship which has ever existed 
between the two Lodges induces me to reply to part only 
of your letter and without delay to assure you of the 
pleasure your letter gave me as containing expression of 
the desire of yourself and the members of Lodge Per- 
severance to maintain and continue these friendly rela- 
tions which are so conducive to the harmony and well 
being of the Lodge over which I have the honour to preside. 
The other part of your letter must be the subject of re- 
ference to the Secretary and Treasurer of the Lodge and 
will, I hope, be arranged by them and the result commu- 
nicated to you at an early opportunity. With every 
fraternal regard, 

Yours fraternally, 
H- B- LYNCH 



Bombay, 22nd January 1852, 
Worshipful Sir and Dear Brother, 

In continuation of my letter of the 18th January, 
replying to your letter of the 5th January, I have now the 
pleasure of enclosing you an order on the Treasurer of 
Lodge Rising Star for Rs. 316-10-8, i. e-, Rs- 400 less 
83-5-4 which you propose to credit this Lodge, being the 
moiety of the receipt of 4 Initiations on the 27th ultimo, 
there being no other receipt available since the last pay- 
ment, the lodge being in debt as will* be seen by the 
enclosed memorandum. The list of members of Lodge 
Rising Star, who were on the lodge's rolls <3n the 3rd of 
March 1845 is forwarded as desired by you. I shall 



368 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

have much pleasure in fixing with you, as you suggest, the 
days of meetings of the Lodge Rising Star, in order to 
arrange the time most convenient to you. 

With fraternal regards, 
Worshipful and dear Brother, 
Yours Fraternally, 
M. BOYCE. 



(APPENDIX E.) 

Proceedings at a meeting of the undersigned Brethren 
of Lodge Rising Star appointed as a Special Committee at 
the last Lodge Meeting on the 20th April 1852. 

1. Read the correspondence which has passed between 
Lodges Rising Star and Perseverance regarding the 
claims of the latter against the former Lodge. 

The dates of the letters are as follows : 

From Secretary of Lodge Perseverance to Secretary of 
Lodge Rising Star, dated 24th December 1851. 

Reply of Secretary of Lodge Rising Star, dated 25th 
December 1851. 

From The Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance to 
the Worshipful Master of Lodge Rising Star, 
dated 8th January 1852. 

From The Worshipful Master of Lodge Rising Star to 
the Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance, 
dated the 18th and 22nd January 1852. 

*From The Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance to 
the Worshipful Master of Lodge Rising Star, 
dated 30th January 1852. 

*From The Worshipful Master of Lodge Rising Star to 
the Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance, 
dated lOt'h April 1852. 

* These letters are missing. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 369 

2. The members of the Committee having perused the 
correspondence with much attention, proceed to submit 
their sentiment and opinions as to the lodge's future 
course for the consideration of the members of Rising 
Star. 

3. The Committee greatly regret that the Worshipful 
Master of Perseverance should have thought it necessary 
to address such a letter to Worshipful Brother Lynch as 
the one which bears date, the 30th January last, and 
which, from its tone and spirit, they trust was not written 
with the concurrence and approbation of the Brethren of 
Perseverance in Lodge assembled. 

4- The Committee consider the reply dated the 10th 
April of the Worshipful Master of Rising Star as 
characterized throughout by the mild and truly Masonic 
feeling which should always mark communications, whe- 
ther personal or otherwise, between members of the 
Craft, and especially between the Masters of different 
Lodges. 

5. The Committee are of opinion that the Worshipful 
Brother Boyce has taken a fair and just view of the 
claims of the Lodge Perseverance against Lodge Rising 
Star, and that the financial result shewn in his letter 
is quite correct. 

6. The Committee beg to record their entire concurrence 
in, and approval of, the Worshipful Brother Boyce's 
letter to the Worshipful Master of Lodge Perseverance, 
dated the 10th April. 

7. As regards the future the Committee are of opinion 
that the Resolution passed by the Provincial Grand Lodge 
on the 24th November 1846 should be mcyiified ; and that 
an immediate application be made for that purpose to the 
Right Worshipful Brother LeGeyt, Provincial Grand 

Master. 

47 



370 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

8. According to that Resolution one half of Rising, 
Star's receipts are to be made over to Perseverance 
Rising Star having the accommodation of the Lodge 
Rooms. The Committee are of opinion that Rising Star's 
payments, under the Resolution in question, are wholly 
disproportionate to the accommodation and benefit re- 
ceived by her from the use for one or at most two nights 
in a month of the Rooms and Lodge paraphernalia (the 
proprietory right in which being vested in the Provincial 
Grand Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter, Perseverance, and 
Rising Star) in Grant Buildings, and that the effect; of the 
Resolution is to divert, in fact, the greatest portion of her 
funds unto the treasury of Lodge Perseverance. 

9. As the Committee are of opinion that it cannot be 
the desire of the Provincial Grand Lodge or of the 
Brethren of Perseverance, that Perseverance should gain 
at the expense of Rising Star, they beg to propose the 
following as the basis of the arrangement to be submitted 
for the consideration of the Provincial Grand Lodge 
and Perseverance : 

i. That Rising Star continue to have as heretofore 
the use of the Lodge Rooms, Lodge Furniture 
and lodge Refreshment kit. 

ii. That in consideration of such accommodation 
Lodge Rising Star pay such portion of the rent 
and cost of establishment as may be deter- 
mined upon by the Provincial Grand Lodge 
and Perseverance in addition to a monthly 
allowance for the use of the kit, etc. 
iii. That Rising Star pay all expenses attending her 
meetings on account of lights, extra servants, 
refreshments, and 

iv. That a Committee consisting of two members of 
each Lodge be appointed to settle the matter, an 
Officer of the Grand Lodge being appointed as 
Umpire or President* 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3M S. 371 



10. Both lodges having been so long bound together 
for the promotion of the best interests of the Craft in 
Western India, the Committee hope that the good under- 
standing and truly masonic feeling, which has existed 
since the formation of Rising Star, will still continue to 
mark the intercourse between the two Lodges, and that 
the matter now under consideration may be settled 
equitably and to the satisfaction of Perseverance and 
Rising Star, so that harmony and brotherly love may 
prevail amongst us. 

11. On the 3rd March 1845 the Brethren of Perse- 
verance passed the following Resolution : 

" That the actual members of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India be considered extra members of Lodge 
Perseverance, be warned of its meetings, and be entitled 
to all the privileges of ordinary members excepting that 
of speaking or voting on questions before the Lodge. " 

12. The Committee regret to find that the above Reso- 
lution (as honourable to Perseverance as to Rising Star; 
has been recently abrogated by Perseverance and that it 
has been ruled that members, of Rising Star wishing to 
join Perseverance must be balloted for and pay the 
joining fee. 

13. The Committee being firmly convinced that the 
same good feeling which Rising Star always felt for* 
Perseverance, still exists,, would recommend for consid- 
eration that the same privilege which was reciprocally 
accorded to the Brethren of Perseverance, be allowed to 
remain in full force, and that all the Members of that 
Lodge continue to be considered extra Members of Rising 
Star, agreeably to the terms of the Resolution of 3rd 
March 1845. 

W. BLOWERS. 
W. WBLLIS. 

G. KlNGSTONE. 
M- O'MEALY- 
M. CURSETJI. 



372 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

APPENDIX F. 

Bombay, 20th September 1852. 
SIR AND BROTHER, 

I exceedingly regret that in a moment of excitement I 
so far forgot myself as to erase my signature to a 
masonic address presented to you in the Rooms of Lodge 
Perseverance on the 12th February last and beg to offer 
my sincere apology for the act. 

Yours obediently, 

G. E. ASHBURNER 

To 

W. BLOWERS, ESQR., 

&C-, &C., 

Bombay. 



APPENDIX G, 

" Brother, Will you permit us to send you a slight 
" testimony of our esteem and our lively sympathy. 
" There is among you a Mason whose virtue and whose 
" wisdom are known to you. He has presided over your 
' ' labours, he has made himself remarkable by his enlight- 
"ened zeal for the good of Freemasonry. He is good, 
"generous, and friendly; in one word, a true Mason. 
" Cede to us the right of sharing with his mother-lodge 
" the honour of reckoning him among the number of our 
"children/' 

" The English Lodge No. 204 at its meeting of the 27th 
" day of the second month of the year 5852 of the true 
" light accorded tcr him the title of Honorary Member ; it 
"sends him a jewel in testimony of its affection of its 
" esteem and of 1 its gratitude. " 



OP WESTERN INDIA No.' 3 42 S.C. 373 

The jewel is the symbol of a master of a lodge and 
bears the following inscriptions, on one side, 

" L 'Anglaise No, 204 St. John Bordeaux- 

Hon : Member W. Blowers," 
and on the other 

" La L' Anglaise (Bordeaux), 

and W. Blowers (Bombay). 

Estime, Affectionet Reconnaisance." 

The jewel is suspended from a blue collar with gold 
lines. 

APPENDIX H. 

Free Masons' Hall, llth April 1855. 
WORSHIPFUL SIR AND DEAR BROTHER, 

I am directed by the Right Worshipful Officiating Pro- 
vincial Grand Master of Western India to acquaint you 
that the whole of the correspondence forwarded by you 
under cover of your letter of the 26th February last has 
been laid before the Provincial Grand Lodge. 

The Provincial Grand Lodge are of opinion that inas- 
much as proxies are not admissible to the ballot box, they 
cannot be permitted in the election of a Master and that 
their introduction in the case referred to was contrary to 
the universal practice of the Craft, to the spirit of the 
constitution and in defiance of the Bye-laws of the Lodge 
over which you preside- 

The Provincial Grand Lodge would therefore desire to 
point out to Lodge " Rising Star " that they have fallen 
into error and that the election of Brother Crawford can- 
not be regarded as valid, and the Provincial Grand Lodge 
request that the members of the Lodge will at their next 
regular meeting proceed to the re-election, of a Master in 
due and ancient form, the Secretary taking care that 
seven days' notice of the business of the meeting be given 
to each member. 



374 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

The Provincial Grand Lodge guarantees the validity of 
all Brother Crawford's acts whilst filling the Chair of 
Lodge Rising Star, 

The Provincial Grand Lodge desire to express their 
opinion that Broth'er Merwanjee Maneckjee, who has 
brought this subject to their notice, has been contumaci- 
ous in his behaviour in refusing to obey the summonses 
sent to him and they request that he may be admonished in 
open Lodge that such conduct is a violation of the 
principles of Freemasonry, which require especially the 
exercise of three excellencies of character, "Secrecy, 
Fidelity, and Obedience". 

The documents referred to in the last paragraph of your 
letter are returned as requested. 

I have the honour to be, 

Worshipful Sir and Brother, 

Yours faithfully and fraternally, 

W. BLOWERS. 

Provincial Grand Secretary. 
The Worshipful Master of 

Lodge Rising Star, 

Bombay. 



(Brother M. M. Senna's Reply.} 

Brethren, I have listened with attention to the repri- 
mand just administered from the Chair- Had it not been 
the command of the Provincial Grand Lodge, whose 
authority I am bound to obey, I should have said a great 
deal to show that if one of the two, that is Brother Craw- 
ford or I, deserve severally to be reprimanded for our 
supposed misdemeanour, it was he and not I should have 
been subjected to a trial like the present for infringing 
the most fundamental principle of our Order, but as it 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. '3 42 S.C. 375 

is, it would ill become me to hesitate for a moment to 
acquiesce cheerfully in the decision which the Provincial 
Grand Lodge seems to have arrived at in finding fault 
in a part I took in the proceeding. 

I, however, can plainly see that the Provincial Grand 
Lodge has obviously (whether intentionally or not I cannot 
say) been misled as to matters of fact involving a very 
simple question at issue between me and Brother Craw- 
ford and the party of brethren who supported him uncon- 
stitutionally in the Chair, which act has been, as I had all 
along contended, declared by the Provincial Grand Lodge 
to be altogether illegal and the election of the Master of 
this lodge had to be gone over again. 

I have been charged, it would seem, for not obeying the 
lawful command of the Worshipful Master of the Lodge 
Rising Star. I did so for reasons, and to my mind most 
cogent, which I gave out in my several letters, and in 
which I believe very few indeed would differ, that having 
questioned the legality of the election in question of 
Brother Crawford, protested throughout against his acts, 
I could not consistently and conscientiously attend any 
meeting or any body of brethren met by his order or by a 
resolution of the Lodge of which he had been, as I have 
shown and as the Provincial Grand Lodge have certified, 
illegally elected Master. If, however, the Provincial Grand 
Lodge please and think otherwise, all I can say is I am 
sorry for it. 

The next gravamen of the charge is that I complained 
directly to the Provincial Grand Lodge by infringing the 
Rule 38 of our Bye-laws. I beg to say that I repudiate 
the charge. I did not infringe that Rule. The Rule is as 
follows : 

" That in the event of any Brother feeling himself 
aggrieved by any decision or proceeding of the Lodge he 
shall be at liberty to appeal to the Provincial Grand Lodge 



376 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

of Western India ; such appeal being preferred through 
the Worshipful Master of the Lodge.*' 

Now, my complaints have been addressed to the Provin- 
cial Grand Lodge and sent to the Secretary of our Lodge 
for transmission, and I, to take time by the forelock and 
as the Provincial Grand Lodge was then about to meet in 
a few days and not to meet again for three months, fur- 
nished its Secretary with a copy or duplicate of my said 
complaint transmitted, as beforesaid, through the channel 
prescribed in rule No. 38 above quoted. And when 
I had found it indispensable to transmit to the Secretary 
of the Lodge my formal and solemn protest against the 
proceedings of the Lodge while the question of the legality 
or illegality of the election of the Worshipful Master was 
decided by the Provincial Grand Lodge, I sent a copy of it 
to the Provincial Grand Master with an observation or 
two therein of which I kept no secret with the Lodge, for I 
had communicated it the very next instant to the Secretary 
of the Lodge. I have thus shown that the position I took at 
the outset I maintained throughout to the end, from which 
the result of my appeal to the Provincial Grand Lodge 
far from shaking me, have confirmed me in. Secondly, 
that I have not directly corresponded with the Provin- 
cial Grand Lodge but through the medium of this Lodge, 
only furnishing the executive of the former with copies 
of my said representation sent through the channel of 
the latter. 

I heartily regret the existence of any unfriendly or 
unbrotherly feeling among us but I consider I did my 
duty to the Craft in general and this Lodge in particular 
in thus bringing forward this vital question for the final 
decision of the euperior authorities at the risk even of 
incurring personal ill-will or unfriendly feeling of others 
towards me, though on my part I declare as a man and 
mason, I have none towards any of the brethren. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 377 

If Brother Crawford be this day re-elected to the Chair 
of the Lodge in a constitutional and not unconstitutional 
manner I shall be bound most cheerfully to obey him and 
lawful commands that would emanate from him or of the 
Lodge of which he may be so elected as a master. 



APPENDIX I. 

VILLA BYCULLA, 

20th July 1854- 
My Dear Bar, 

The question now under our consideration, or rather 
of the Grand Lodge Committee of which you are the 
Chairman, and to which Blowers asked me to attend, is, 
I think, of the greatest importance, greater perhaps than 
the generality of the existing members of both the Rising 
Star and Perseverance commonly comprehend. It is a 
question that goes to the very root of the constitution of 
our order, and if not cautiously approached and calmly 
discussed, and grappled with firmness, it might tend to 
subvert not only the main object for which Lodge Rising 
Star was formed but to destroy the very landmark of 
masonry. 

I thought at first not much of the squabbles between 
members of both the Lodges, which commenced on 
Brother Ashburner taking the Chair of Perseverance two 
years ago, and from that time might be dated the 
black balling of the members of the one into the other 
when proposed to be affiliated. But matters have 
arrived at a crisis now, so much so that the existing Wor- 
shipful Master of the Star gave out that hfe would rather 
have, or recommend the ballot to be done away with, or 
increase the number of the negative bails, whfch, in other 
words, amount to the same thing. 



378 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

And if this is done, what next? Our landmark being 
removed, that is, strictest scrutiny the due and only 
safeguard against questionable admittance dispensed 
with, any person, no matter who or what he may be, can 
obtain easy admittance into our temple. All that he will 
be required to do is to get one to propose and another to 
second him, for he is sure to secure the preponderance of 
the white ballot for him. I doubt of its expediency in 
respect even to Europeans, most solemnly protest in 
respect to the admittance of natives. 

The peculiar circumstances under which the native 
lodge was, for the first time, here erected, the serious 
difficulties we have had to battle with, the utmost anxiety 
we manifested on the one hand to guard against any 
untoward event by an influx of intrants, while on the 
other to keep up the Lodge in its purity of purpose, you, 
who are one of the two or three of its original members 
now here, who took very active part in its construction, 
know so well that I need not enter into historical details. 
But I must not omit to remind you of the degree of res- 
ponsibility I then undertook upon myself, or rather our 
late and present Right Worshipful Past Grand Masters 
threw on my shoulders in opening the portals of masonry 
to the " jas and khas." I pledged to acquit myself of that 
responsibility to the extent of my knowledge, power and 
ability. Though poor in the latter two, I was not wanting 
in my zeal for the cause we had undertaken, and how I 
performed my part of the same I leave the Lodge records 
to speak and testify. 

That I would not have a candidate proposed without 
the most strict and searching scrutiny into his moral 
worth, mental capacity and personal fitness on which, 
particularly thg first requirement, you and others know 
how very tenacious I have always been ( you may 
remember in some instances I had written to enquire of 
you touching the fitness of the applicants of whom you 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3.',9 S.C. 379 

were supposed to know something), that several appli- 
cants had to wait for months before their names were 
brought forward to enable my prosecuting the enquiry. 
Every correspondence relating to this was read in open 
Lodge, if in favour of the candidate with an outline of 
the candidate's family, character and pursuits, the 
members present were invariably made acquainted in 
order to enable the members (Europeans know little or 
nothing of the same) to judge of the fitness or otherwise 
of the candidate for admission, whilst the names of those 
not brought forward or if proposed for admission with- 
drawn under instructions of the Worshipful Master if 
they were on enquiry found to be short of moral and 
mental worth " or personal fitness and among those 
rejected candidates or those whose names not brought 
forward there were some of my own friends and rela- 
tions whom on personal considerations I should have 
liked to have seen admitted. 

The motto, I proposed giving our Lodge, and which 
you and others invariably heard me declare in and out of 
its meetings, was " We glory in the quality not quantity 
of our intrants." We inaugurated our first meeting with 
the resolution " To admit native gentlemen of acknow- 
ledged position and integrity" (the preliminary corres- 
pondence between the Rising Star and the Provincial 
Grand Lodge on the subject I think is essential for every 
member to read over and study at the present juncture). 
The head or influential members of the castes brought 
forth their influence to check our progress!- We waited 
for better days. They were long in coming: in the mean- 
time I kept up, I may say, tha lodge at my own expense 
rather than to open its portals too fully and widely to 
every one who chose to get into it by ashing for. 

The original members gradually dropped off. The 
remaining got impatient for working, and >t was lately 
ruled to r^lax our original resolution a little. I too 



380 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

thought it might advance the cause of our order if we 
could admit a few of the young Bombay whose moral 
worth would stand the required test of examination. 
But the present move among some of the members of the 
Lodge is to place a little or no limit to the freedom of 
admission, or in other words, reverse the motto, "quantity 
not quality" of intrants, at least it would seem so. 

On leaving Bombay last year, our dear esteemed Bro. 
LeGeyt placed me in the Chair of the Star. I refused to 
take if for several reasons ; among others, a worthy 
member, Brother Ballingal, was ready to take it, and I 
cheerfully vacated it in his favour. I was on that occasion 
particularly enjoined by the Right Worshipful seriously 
to continue guardful of the admission of candidates. 
But when I found it was impossible for me to do 
so from having no means of knowing aught about 
a candidate, except reading his name, in the circular 
sent round a few evenings previous to his being 
ballotted for, I of course within such short interval 
would scarcely have time to enquire as to his 
" whereabouts and whatabouts " and finding that an 
attempt was made to ballot for an objectionable candi- 
date one evening, although the summons convening that 
meeting made no mention of the candidate to be so bal- 
lotted for that night (happy, on this legal objection his 
election was deferred when on a ballot though twice 
repeated on the appointed night the candidate in question 
was rejected). The objection did not originate with me, 
but with others for which, however, I saw good ground. 
I thought it advisable to address our Right Worshipful a 
private note on the subject with twofold objects to exone- 
rate myself of the responsibility being imposed on me and 
to point out a means by which the position of the Lodge 
might be guarded against danger of which note I will 
just give you an extract or two. I said, " Masonry is in 
danger. I conscientiously aver, if candidates such as the 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 381 

one I have mentioned (of whom Bro. LeGeyt happened to 
know something) , we got into our temple, where would 
you stop? I cannot be expected to be always attending 
the Lodge or to command attention from its members 
generally. There must be a watch-guard, I therefore 
suggested." 

On these several premises I would propose that there 
should be a committee, a standing one, always appointed 
in the Lodge consisting of two Europeans of whom its 
Worshipful Master be one with a casting vote, one 
Mahomedan and one Parsee to enquire first into the 
character and position of every candidate, whetherhe is an 
independent or dependent man, or placed under family or 
other influence, and into his moral worth generally, before 
his name is to be brought forward, and, secondly, that 
no candidate is to be initiated on the night of his election 
but at the subsequent monthly meeting when and after 
the minutes of the preceding meeting are confirmed. 

The objectionable candidate, as I have above said, was 
on ballot rejected. The objection did not originate with 
me, though I concurred in the weight of that objection, 
and yet directly was I charged by one of the members 
to have put up others to black ball the objected candi- 
date ! How I met my accuser, how on his own ground I 
floored him, I leave you to satisfy by the perusal of the 
accompanying. The thing was beneath my further notice, 
and I took none about it afterwards. 

Since the above, ten members of Rising Star on being 
proposed for affiliation at Perseverance, were, I heard, 
invariably black balled, and there has been black balling 
wholesale in Rising Star, both for candidates proposed for 
affiliation and initiation, with both of which directly or 
indirectly I have had no concern. I wa3 absent on some 
of the stormy nights from our meetings, and when I was 
present some of, the candidates, though not proposed and 
seconded by me but whom I strongly supported by re- 



382 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

commending them by an address to the attention of the 
meeting on several grounds, were rejected. I demanded 
repetition of the ballot, thinking there might have been 
some mistake. The next time there ware more black 
balls than at first. This had the appearance, at least, of 
the existence of party feelings, and it has been asserted 
that this was owing to some difference among the mem- 
bers of Perseverance and Rising Star confined, as they 
said, to the rupee-paying members of both. How far 
these statements are correct I have no means of judging, 
not having had any concern in the matter, directly or 
indirectly. 

I strongly am against the wholesale system of black 
balling in any Lodge, whether our own or Perseverance, 
and although I concur in the advisability of adopting a 
measure calculated to smother, not inflame, the existence 
of any angry feeling between Masons and members of 
one or other Lodges, yet doing away with the hallowed 
privilege, the sacred right of each member to vote, ac- 
cording to his light or view, of the propriety or otherwise 
of electing any member, or any other question to be 
decided by ballot, or by enlarging the numbers of the 
nagative ball, which I contend is the same thing as doing 
away with the ballot, would be the most objectionable 
mode of accomplishing the object, and it would be making 
bad worse again. If, as I heard it suggested, the nega- 
tives are required to stand up, say, required to give in open 
Lodge the reasons for objecting to a candidate, in the one 
case the very principle of ballot is rendered void of utility, 
by letting everybody know that A and C blackballed B, 
which A and C for reasons of their own would be the last 
men to like or to become an open enemy of the party black 
balled or of his advocates and friends, and in the other case 
it would be vesting a Master of a Lodge with an extraordi- 
nary power of getting out every family secret or private 
history or character of every rejected candidate which 



OF WESTERN INDIA No.' 342 S.C. 383 

ought, for the sake of Masonry, sake of society, and for 
the sake of decency, to be suffered to remain buried in 
the individual breast, otherwise what would Masonry be 
then? Instead of being an assembly of " good men and 
true " for the purpose of introducing peace, brotherly 
love and charity among mankind in general and Masons 
in particular, it would engender, f omant and foster the 
very reverse thereof- 

Heaven forbid that one valuing his own peace of 
mind and enjoyment of reputation of being a good man 
and true should subject himself to be enrolled in such a 
society, to hear debates on peoples' ganeral character 
not public but private ; it would pollute the very essence 
and spirit of our order. Avaunt then, I would exclaim 
masonry ! 

Although as I have said above, I yielded to the sugges- 
tion to relax a little our past rules in respect to the ad- 
mission of natives, for I considered, as I consider, that by 
admitting into our Craft, by being disciplined as Masons, 
and brought into closer intercourse with those whose 
first duty is to maintain their position erect by respecting 
truth ; some of those young Indian party, if found inde= 
pendently circumstanced and v/hose moral character 
stand the test of an enquiry to be instituted, if possible, 
in the quiet and less arduous mode I have suggested, 
would be valuable requisitions yet I would not recom- 
mend even the tag-rag of the other day, because he pas- 
sed a creditable examination in a college or school, nor 
would I take up every man of family, of rupees, or other- 
wise favourite with this and that class of Europeans. 

We, as Masons, have a duty of higher grade to per- 
form. In the cases of natives of this country, the 
duty I may add responsibility increase^ tenfold; painful 
as it is to me, truth forces me to say they, as a body, sadly 
require that .moral impress to befit them, into general 
society, much less into that of ours. Where we could we 



384 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

would never be too watchful. A word of a Mason is a 
safeguard from an European member, if he vouches for 
the admission of an European candidate of whom he may 
be supposed to know much. But vouchsafing for a native 
candidate by an European who is not supposed to be so 
conversant as a native, required to be most carefully con- 
sidered. If the slightest shade of objection is raised to 
impugn the propriety of admitting a native candidate by 
one of our members, whether native or European, I would 
not be acting to my duty if I supported such a candidate. 

A native candidate need only not be, living under the 
tongue of good report, but also he must be beyond even 
the shade of a supposition to the contrary. 

The case between a native and European Lodge is 
widely different, and should not be conducted under one 
and the same rule or precedents. 

The more I think of this as a man and a Mason, the 
greater I feel the responsibility we have assumed to our- 
selves in throwing open and widening the portals of 
masonry to the natives of this country, and in corres- 
ponding ratio the greater degrea of circumspection is 
requisite than in the cases of Europeans to guard against 
any untoward mishap which those who originally opposed 
us in this undertaking made us beware of ! 

I think I have done my duty in letting you know so 
fully and so unreservedly my feelings and sentiments on 
the subject, and as the Chairman of the Committee you 
are welcome to (and I shall be glad if you will) lay this 
before Brothers Compton and Blowers, who appear to me 
to be the only remaining original members of the Star 
now here who took an active share in debating the ques- 
tion when first started, now 10 years ago. 

* MANECKJEE CURSETJEE. 

P. S. I commenced writing this letter last night and did not 
finish it till past this morning. I shall cause a copy to be kept ere 
ending it to you. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C, 385 

APPENDIX J. 
To 

MANECKJE.E CURSETJEE SHROFF, ESQR-, 

BOMBAY. 

Bombay, 25th April 1862. 
Right Worshipful Sir and Brother, 

We, the undersigned Master, Officers and Past and 
Present Members of Lodge Rising Star of Western 
India, No. 342, in pursuance of a Resolution passed at 
the regular meeting of the Lodge on the night of the 19th 
December 1859, avail ourselves of this opportunity to 
present you this address, expressive of the many obliga- 
tions and sincere esteem we feel and entertain for you on 
account of your exertions on behalf of Masonry in 
general, and of the Lodge in particular. 

You, Worshipful Sir, have been the distinguished 
Native Gentleman on this side of India who has been 
fortunate to be the first to receive the glorious Masonic 
light and who has thereby laid open the portals of this 
ancient and honourable Fraternity to every good and 
respectable Native Gentleman. 

You, Worshipful Sir, have been, moreover, the main 
cause of the erection of this Lodge. 

At the latter end of the year 1843 Right Worshipful 
Brother Burnes, the then Provincial Grand Master of 
Western India, in conjunction with the Right Worshipful 
Brother the late lamented Brother LeGeyt founded the 
Lodge with the eminent assistance of your Worshipful 
self the only Native Gentleman who then belonged to our 
Masonic Craft. 

When governing the Lodge as the Worshipful Master 
in the Chair you have showed and proved to the Brethren 
that your heart and head were guided by the Masonic 
virtues- 

You were a perfect Ashlar whereupon to try and 
adjust our* Masonic opunioris and. actions. 

25 



,386 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

In short, Worshipful Sir, you cannot but spontaneously 
exact from us our deep-felt esteem, love, and gratitude 
for the several and valuable services rendered by you to 
the "Lodge Rising Star," either as one of its originators 
or as its oldest member who remained attached to it unin- 
terruptedly from its very commencement to the present 
moment or as its staunchest and sincere friend as much 
in its days of adversity as in its days of prosperity. 

Worshipful Sir, we are sensible of the loss the Lodge 
shall sustain during your temporary absence from this 
country. W T e shall have the consolation, however, in 
your absence of looking upon your likeness (which is 
expected back shortly from China) with pleasure and 
delight, as it will remind us of a distinguished Brother 
whom we feel proud to honour this evening. 

Had the jewel and apron voted to you, arrived from 
England ere this it would have given us great pleasure 
in having them presented to you this evening to be car- 
ried by you to England, which when worn by you there, 
would have reminded you in that distant country of your 
loving brethren of this Lodge. 

In conclusion, accept our sincere wishes and may the 
Great Architect of the Universe guard you and your 
children and keep you in His Holy shelter, and may the 
bond of friendship and good fellowship which subsists 
between you and the members of the Lodge be never 
severed till we are called upon to visit the Grand Lodge 
where the Great Architect of the Universe is the supreme 
ruler and Great Grand Master. 

Reply. 

The Worshipful Past Master, Brother Maneckjee 
Cursetjee, in returning thanks to the Worshipful Master 
and Brethren for the honour they had done him, said as 
follows: 

"I am obliged to you, brethren, for the very kind 
nwuier in which you have appreciated the little I have 



OF* WES f ESN INDIA No. 3l>2 S.C. 387 

been able to do for the Lodge, in doing which I feel I have 
only done my duty. There were difficulties, and of no 
ordinary nature, in the reception of the Natives of India 
in the bond of the Fraternity. The then most distin- 
guished Mason, Right Worshipful Brother Burnes, and a 
coadjutor of his, Brother Barrow, wished that I should 
be made a Mason, and I made an application, bub the 
members of the Lodge in which I was proposed ( Lodge 
Perseverance), who were then under the English banner 
raised objections to my election, not for any individual 
disqualifications or demerits but solely because I was a 
native. They argued that if they opened the portals of 
Masonry to one native they would be obliged to open to 
all and they would not know where to end and demurred 
to my being admitted to enter the Craft. 

"Twenty-one years ago when I was in England, I was 
to be made a Mason under the auspices of the Grand 
Master, the Duke of Sussex, but when I was in England he 
was on the Continent and when he returned to England I 
had been away on the Continent. I was disappointed. 

"When I went to Paris I was initiated in the Craft 
at the Lodge La Glorie de T Universe by my esteemed 
friend, the Duke de Caze. After my return to Bombay I 
was asked to visit Lodge Perseverance, which I refused 
to do, and when being proposed a joining member objec- 
tions were again raised for my joining. The late lamented 
Worshipful Brother Le Gey tand many other distinguished 
Masons then came to the resolution rather to resign the 
Lodge if I were not admitted, and to open a new one 
expressly for the admittance of natives, which laid the 
foundation of the " Star." 

"I look up to Masonry as one of the instances in 
bringing up the morals of the natives bf India. Give 
them an education as much as you like but it cannot 
alone elevate the morals without the aid of Masonry, 
which brings them into closer contact and ties of friend- 



388 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

ship and bonds of fellowship in a society mixed like 
this. 

" I am glad to say that the efforts have originated in 
the erection of this Lodge, in" which I am proud to see so 
many of my native friends in the ties of friendship and 
fellowship. I deserve no thanks for what I have done. 
A goblet or a plate would have been of little use to me, 
but as you have been pleased to have my picture put up 
here I proposed then that a Brother Artist was in poor 
circumstances and a few rupees this way put into his 
hands would not be ill-spent, and that the Lodge funds 
might not suffer 1 proposed to contribute a purse, and 
Brother Secretary, you shall receive from me a sum equi- 
valent to money spent on the picture, to form a nucleus to 
a fund for charitable purposes. Daar and Worshipful Sir 
and Brethren, my short stay in England will not sever 
my connection from the Lodge, and I hope to see you one 
and all in good health and prosperity after my return." 



APPENDIX K. 

East Gate, Lincoln, 

September 12th, 1862. 
, To THE' WORSHIPFUL MASTER, OFFICER, AND BRETHREN 

OF THE LODGE RISING STAR OF WESTERN INDIA. 
My dear Brethren, 

It has been remarked by a profound moralist that a 
token of respect to a man advanced in years conveys 
more real gratification to his mind than would have 
b'jcn produced at any earlier period by a similar demon- 
stration. 

Your kind approval of my labours, communicated by 
our worthy and esteemed Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee, 
accompanied *by a. vote of a Burnes' Medal, affords a 
striking illustration of the above truth. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 31>2 S.C. 389 

As you justly observe in the Resolution, I have labour- 
ed for more than half a century in the cause of Masonry 
and I have endeavoured to illustrate its transcendent 
beauties and to place it on its legitimate basis as a bene. 
volent institution calculated to improve the morals and 
enlighten the understanding of all worthy men of what- 
ever climate or religion who have accepted it as a light to 
guide them through the devious wilderness of this world 
in their progress to another and a better. 

Under the impression that the Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India is prosperous and flourishing I sincerely 
pray that although the distance prevents us from becoming 
personally acquainted with each other here, we shall 
meet in a more perfect state of happiness in the Grand 
Lodge above. 

Believe me to be, my dear brethren, ever truly yours, 

GEO. OLIVER. 



Grand Hotel, 

Paris, 20th September 1862. 
MONSIEUR LE MARSHALL. 
Most venerable Frere, 

I have the honour of sending Your Excellency the 
enclosed from Lodge Rising Star of Western India con- 
veying its resolution to present you with one of its medals. 

I have been deputed to present that medal to you, 
which I shall feel great gratification in doing in a manner 
most acceptable to you. Friday you were out of Town 
when I enquired at your Hotel, while my stay in Paris 
will be but of a very short duration. I trust to your 
affording me an early opportunity of enabling me to 
execute the commission with which I have been charged 
by the brethren. >J 

You may like to know something of this Lodge. It 
is one of peculiar, or rather I should say formed under 
peculiar circumstances. 



390 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

There were objections (unmasonic ones of coarse) 
started by some of the European Masons to the admis- 
sion in the portals of our beloved Order of the Natives of 
India, thera being no precedent to guide their course 
therein. I was the first Native of that country who when 
first travelling in Europe in 1841 was initiated in Paris 
in the Lodge A 1'Gloire da TUniverse under the auspices 
of one of your predecessors, my deeply lamented friend 
Due de Gaze, and I subsequently have been in a measure 
instrumental in founding the Lodge aforesaid for the 
reception of my countrymen, and the medal of which one 
I have been deputed to present to you was struck in hon- 
our and commemoration of the advent so interesting in 
the annals of Freemasonry. 

You will thus observe, Most Worshipful Sir, that to the 
spirit of the French Masonry our Native brethren in India 
owe the kindling and diffusion of the " light'* among them. 

With consideration of high respect and fraternal feel- 
ings, 

I remain, Dear Sir and Most Worshipful Brother, 
Yours devoted to service, 

MANECKJEE CURSETJEE. 
Son Excellence 

Monsieur le Marshall 
<- et haut Venerable Frere Magnon 

illustrious et haut Grand Master France, etc. etc. etc. 



Place Vendomme, 
L'amitre Parfaite, 

S. L. A. D. G. 0. De Fr. 
Or. de Paris le 24 Sept. 1862. 
To 

The Respectable LODGE RISING STAR OF BOMBAY, 

S.*. S/. S.'. Worshipful Master, Senior and Junior Wardens 
and the rest of the Brethren. 

Being overwhelmed with the kind reception given me 
by the most respectable and dear Brother Maneckjee 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 391 

Cursetjee, words fail me properly to express to you my 
sentiments and gratitude with which my heart is filled 
just now. Thank you, thrice thank you. 

I am happy at being remembered by my very dear and 
honoured Bro. Camajee, neither have I forgotten him. 
We often think of him. May God protect him ! 

You each and all can rely upon my devotion. I shall 
endeavour to be worthy of the medal and of having the 
presentation of the Lodge Rising Star. 

Send me your orders and I shall feel proud to execute 
them. 

Yours devotedly and affectionately, 

Seuget 30: 

Representative of the Club de Bosphore, 
Grand Lodge of Constantinople. 



To 

The Just and Perfect Respectable LODGE RISING STAR, 
No. 342, of Western India, Bombay. 
Illustrious, Worshipful and Most Respectable Brethren, 

It was impossible to touch my feelings and to honour 
me more than by judging me worthy of being associated- 
with you and by enrolling my name amongst the honorary 
members of your Lodge, add to which the pleasure I 
derived at meeting the truly distinguished Brother the 
amiable bearer of the letter and the medal from your 
Lodge, I mean the very illustrious Bro. Maneckjee Curset- 
jee and which shall never be forgotten by me. A third 
cause for my rejoicing is the knowledge I have obtained 
of my Worshipful friend Cursetjee Rust9mjeeCama being 
at the head of such a large body of respectable Brethren. 
I pray that the G. A. 0. T. U. may keep all the Brethren 
of the just and perfect Lodge Rising Star in happiness 



392 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

and health and that I may have often the occasion to give 
you a substantial proof of my attachment towards you. 

Most illustrious Worshipful and respectable Brethren 
receive my sincerely masonic expression of my eternal 
gratitude for the distinguished honour you have done me 
of which I shall be proud. 

In the mysterious numbers which you know 
Your Most Devoted Bro., 
Meding 30. 

Representative of the Grand Lodge of Saxony 
in the Grand Orient of France. 



APPENDIX L. 

Villa Byculla, 19th March 1863. 
Sirs and Brethren, 

With reference to what occurred at the last regular 
meeting of Lodge Rising Star of Western India, and 
before confirming its proceedings at the ensuing meeting 
summoned to be held to-morrow I feel constrained to ask 
you to read before the Lodge the enclosed true transcript 
I send of the correspondence between Rt. Wor. Bro. 
Judge and me. 

If the subject-matter of the said correspondence or 
any trace of it remain recorded or be allowed to remain 
recorded in the minutes of the Lodge, then, in justice to 
this distinguished Mason and a Worthy Brother, I 
request the Lodge to have embodied in its minutes of 
proceedings what he wrote to me, my answer and his 
reply. (Vide the enclosed.) But if otherwise, if the 
records of the Lpdge bear no mention of the subject, 
then, the enclosed need not be embodied in the minutes 
but merely read in open Lodge and recorded among its 
miscellaneous correspondence, 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S-C. 393 

I will not and I regret considerably, conveniently I 
cannot attend Lodge meetings. 

Your faithful servant and brother, 

MANECKJEE CURSETJEE, 

Past Master of Lodge Rising Star of Western India. 
To 

SECRETARY, LODGE RISING STAR OF WESTERN INDIA, 

Lodge Rooms, Colaba. 



Transcript of the enclosures to Rt. Wor. Bro. Maneck- 
jee Cursetjee's letter, dated 19th March 1863. 

27th February 1863. 
My dear Maneckjee, 

Barton informs me that you proposed me as an Honorary 
Member of Lodge Rising Star and that I was unanimously 
black-balled, there not being a single white ball in the 
box. Is this information correct ? 

If it is correct, will you have the kindness to inform 
Lodge Rising Star that as you proposed me without 
having first obtained my consent, they had no right to 
ballot me and that their ballot by all the rules and 
customs of the Craft is void and that they have no 
right to record it upon their minutes. 

I trust to you to see this act of justice done me if 
Barton's information is correct, because you had no 
right to propose me to the Lodge, either as an honorary 
or joining member without my permission. 

I am utterly at a loss to understand however why the 
members of Rising Star do unanimously entertain ill 
will towards me, for I am not aware of having ever given 
any offence to any of them and I certainly never intend- 
ed to do so. I am afraid their minds have been poisoned 
against me by some vile traducer who ought to be un- 
masked. 

50 



394 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

It occurred to me as possible that they black-balled 
me in revenge for the wholesale black-balling of the 
members of Rising Star by Lodge Perseverance when 
they applied to join that Lodge, but if so their ideas of 
justice must be very strange, for as I am not a member 
of Lodge Perseverance I could not have had anything to 
do with black-balling any of the members of Rising 
Star in it, but Barton had, for he was the prime mover 
in the black-balling by his own admission in open Lodge, 
and yet Rising Star unanimously black-balled me when 
you proposed me as an Honorary Member and unani- 
mously elect Barton to be recommended to be appointed 
Provincial Grand Master of Western India under Scot- 
land at one and the same meeting. 

Yours truly, 
G. S. JUDGE. 

P. S. I hope you will ascertain for me the reason 
for this unanimous black-balling, for I have a right to 
know it as it is an unmerited insult aimed at one ever 
respected by the rest of the Craft. 

To 

MANECKJEE CURSETJEE, ESQR. 



Villa Byculla, 

February 28th, 1863. 
My dear Judge, 

I have the pleasure of your note. If Barton told you 
you were unanimously black-balled on my proposal in the 
" Star " to elect you an Honorary Member, he told you 
what is not quite correct. In the first place there was no 
ballot, but on the show of hands the proposition was lost 
because there were some pros, some cons, and because 
Honorary Members must be elected by acclamation and 
unanimously. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 395 

I feel sorry for this and expressed my feelings by 
instantly leaving the meeting. 

As to Barton's telling you that Rising Star has unani- 
mously elected him to be recommended to be appointed 
Provincial Grand Master, all I can say is that I heard 
of this for the first time from your note under acknow- 
ledgment. I know nothing of it myself. 

In great haste I will not add more than yours 

on the H^J7 

P^ MANECKJEE CURSETJEE. 

To 

G. S. JUDGE, ESQR. 



28th February 1863. 
My Dear Maneckjee, 

Many thanks for your kind letter. I am glad it is not 
so bad as Barton represented it, though I am sorry any 
of the members of Rising Star thought proper to insult 
you. I should still like to know whether the objectors 
have taken offence at me for something or other and if 
so, at what, because my conscience acquits me of having 
intentionally given offence to any one or whether they 
do not think that holding the office of Senior Provincial 
Grand Warden of the District Grand Lodge of Bombay 
makes me a sufficiently distinguished member of the 
Craft to justify them in conferring upon me the honour 
of electing me an Honorary Member of their Lodge 
or whether they do not think I have yet done enough 
for Masonry in Bombay to entitle me to so high an 
honour. 

Lodge St. Andrews in the East, at Poona, thought 
differently some years ago and since that I have wished 
to add enough to have attained a higher position in the 
Craft than I had when they elected me* an Honorary 
Member of their lodge. 



396 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

I must still, therefore, ask you to arrange that nei- 
ther the proposal of my name as an Honorary Member of 
Lodge Rising Star nor its rejection shall be recorded in 
the minutes of your last meeting, as the proposition was 
made without my consent having been first obtained, and 
I shall attend the next meeting of the Rising Star when 
I hope you will accompany me to se3 that it is not 
recorded. 

Yours truly, 

G. S. JUDGE, 
To 

MANECKJEiE CURSETJEE, ESQR. 

(True copies.) 

MANECKJEE CURSETJEE. 



Bombay, 19th March 1863. 
To 
THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER OF LODGE RISING STAR, 

BOMBAY. 
Worshipful Sir and Brother, 

I have be,en informed that at your last meeting Wor- 
shipful Brother Maneckjee Cursetjee proposed me for 
election as an Honorary Member of your Lodge and that 
the proposition was rejected because the ballot was not 
unanimous. As that proposition was made without my 
knowledge or consent, the voting upon it was null and 
void and I therefore protest against any record of the 
transaction being entered upon your minutes. 

I confess I should have been surprised at your having 
committed the irregularity, and to say injustice of taking 
the opinion of your Lodge upon the question of my ma= 
sonic worth in the form of an election as an Honorary 
Member without my consent, if I did not believe that your 
desire to show kindness to me prevented the irregularity 
of the proceeding from occurring to your mind. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S-C. 397 

Whilst protesting against any record of the above 
matters being entered in the minutes book of your Lodge 
and maintaining the irregularity of the whole transaction, 
1 am duly sensible of the honour which Worshipful Bro- 
thers Maneckji Cursetjee and those who voted with him 
intended to confer upon me, and I am duly grateful to him 
and them for their kind intentions. 

I remain, Worshipful Sir and Brother, 
Yours fraternally, 

G. S- JUDGE, 

Deputy Provincial Grand Master of Bombay 
under the Grand Lodge of England. 



APPENDIX M. 
LODGE RISING STAR OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342. 

Bombay, 22nd October 1866. 
To 

WORSHIPFUL BROTHER K. R. CAMA, Secretary, 
Provincial Grand Lodge of Western India under 

Scotland. 
Worshipful Sir and Dear Brother, 

I am desired by the Worshipful Master of Lodge 
Rising Star of Western India No. 342 to request you to 
bring to the prominent notice of the Right Worshipful 
Provincial Grand Master of Western India under Scot- 
land an objectionable practice latterly followed by Lodge 
St. Andrews in the East with respect to initiating native 
residents of Bombay in that Lodge. 

You are aware that Lodge Rising Star was founded 
expressly for the reception of Native Gentlemen of un- 
doubted good character, and an especial covenant was 
entered into between this Lodge and 1 he then only existing 
Lodge, which was Perseverance, restricting the former to 
the initiation of Native Gentlemen only, and the latter to 



398 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

that of European Gentlemen, for the most obvious reason 
that members of each community can only be well known 
within itself On the basis thus laid down, both lodges 
have worked harmoniously to this day without in the least 
interfering with each other's work. This Lodge has, I am 
happy to say, constantly kept before it this important 
object for which it was established, and has refrained 
most conscientiously from initiating any candidate who 
was likely to prove himself unworthy of this lodge and a 
disgrace to the honoured Craft. This accounts for the 
paucity of the members of this Lodge and for the non- 
increase of other Native Lodges. While we are thus 
exercising a strict caution in our own sphere, we are 
grieved to learn that Lodge St. Andrews in the East freely 
initiate native candidates from Bombay who have been 
either refused admission or have not dared to ask for it 
well knowing from common reports that this Lodge is 
very strict in its choice of members. If this system 
is allowed to continue we shall be soon inundated with 
the visits of improper persons with whom we should 
certainly object to meet on a footing of equality. It has 
already come to the notice of some members of this 
Lodge that, encouraged by the successful attempts of 
certain native candidates in getting admittance into 
Freemasonry at Poona, others of the same stamp of 
character hava resolved to make a trip to Poona with the 
express object of getting themselves admitted into the 
Poona Lodge. This circumstance has, therefore, become 
a source of great anxiety to members of this Lodge, for her 
vitality depends on the maintenance of the high position 
which she has enjoyed and which is likely to be under- 
mined if disreputable persons go about in the native 
community styliftg themselves Freemasons. Not only 
will this Lodge be in danger of losing its character but 
Freemasonry "will be brought into contempt in Bombay 
if every person who could afford to pay his entrance fee 



WESTERN INDIA No. '342 S.C- 399 

in the Poona Lodge could turn out bedecked in Masonic 
costumes. The question has stirred up the members/ 
of the Lodge so much that a very animated discussion 
was carried on on the subject at the last meeting of this 
Lodge, the result of which was that a Resolution was 
unanimously passed to represent the circumstances to the 
Provincial Grand Master with a request that he will use 
his best endeavours to get the grievance remedied. 

I remain, 
Worshipful Sir and Dear Brother, 

Yours fraternally, 
JEHANGIR MERWANJI, 
Secretary* Lodge Rising Star. 



APPENDIX N. 

THIS INDENTURE made the third day of May in the 
Christian year one thousand eight 
Parties. hundred and seventy BETWEEN 

JOHN ALEXANDER JAMES 
SHAW of Bombay European Inhabitant and KURSON- 
DASS NENSEE of Bombay Hindoo Inhabitant TRUS- 
TEES of the ESTATE of SORABJEE PESTONJEE 
FRAMJEE NOWROJEE NANABHOY FRAMJEE and 
MERWANJEE JAMSETJEE who lately carried on j 
trade in partnership in Bombay under the name, firm and 
style of " S. and N. NANABHOY " of the first part, the 
said NOWROJEE NANABHOY FRAMJEE of Bombay 
Parsee Inhabitant of the second part and KURSHEDJEE 
RUSTOMJEE CAMA of Bombay Parsee Inhabitant and 
MUNCHERJEE CAWASJEE MURZBAN also of Bom- 
bay Parsee Inhabitant of the third part WHEREAS 
the said NOWROJEE NANABHOY ERAMJEE being 

seized of or otherwise entitled to the 
Settlor's Seism. 

piece or parcel of land and here- 
ditaments hereinafter described and hereby granted 



400 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

conveyed released and assured or expressed and intended 
so to be agreed prior to the insolvency of his said firm to 

convey the same to trustees upon 
seme" ' the trusts hereinafter expressed and 

declared concerning the same for 
the benefit of the members of the MASONIC LODGE in 
Bombay called "RISING STAR OF WESTERN INDIA" 
No. 342 or such other lodge as is hereinafter referred 
to but no conveyance or deed of trust was ever executed 

AND WHEREAS at a meeting of 

wKT^Iate the creditors of the said firm of 
Act 28 of 1865. " S. and N. NANABHOY " convened 

under Act XXVIII of 1865 of the 
Legislative Council of India and held on the twenty-first 
day of May one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six it 
was resolved (inter alia) by a majority in number and 
unsecured value of creditors present or represented at 
the said meeting that the estate of the said firm of 
U S. and N. NANABHOY " should be wound up under the 
management of trustees in accordance with the provisions 
of the said Act XXVIII of 1865 and that an applica- 
tion be made to the High Court for 

fo? windino- up USteeS that Pu r P ose and that ROWLAND 
HAMILTON PESTONJEE NOW- 
ROJEE POCHAJEE and SEWJEE 
High n "t n of t b he WELLJEE should be appointed such 
resolutions to wind trustees AND WHEREAS by an 
order of the High Court of Judi- 
cature at Bombay dated the twenty- 
witSing* uVti4te n es. f fifth day of May one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six the said 
resolutions were confirmed AND WHEREAS by another 
order made by the said High Court of Judicature at 
Bombay in the said matter on the fifth day of June one 
thousand eight, hundred and sixty-six WILLIAM JAMES 
BEST and the said KURSONDAS NENSEE were 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 fif.C. 401 

substituted for the said PESTONJEE NOWROJEE 

POCHAJEE and SEWJEE WELLJEE as trustees of the 

said estate AND WHEREAS by an 

Further substitution. . , T _. . ~ T ,. 

order of the said High Court of Judi- 
cature at Bombay dated the Twenty-second day of 
December one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six it 
was ordered that the said JOHN ALEXANDER JAMES 
SHAW be appointed a trustee in the place and stead of 
the said WILLIAM JAMES BEST resigned AND 
WHEREAS by an order of the said High Court of Judi- 
cature at Bombay made on the Thirtieth day of March 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine it was ordered 
that the said ROWLAND HAMILTON be permitted to 
resign the trusts of the said estate and that any Act by 
the provisions of the said Act required or authorized 
to be done by the trustees . might be done by the 

remaining trustees the said JOHN 

Agreement of said ALEXANDER JAMES" SHAW and 

u^onTrust. KURSONDASS NENSEE AND 

WHEREAS the said JOHN ALEX- 
ANDER JAMES SHAW and KURSONDASS NENSEE 
have consented at the request of the said NOWROJEE 
NANABHOY FRAMJEE to convey the said piece or 
parcel of land and hereditaments to the said KUR- 
SHEDJEE RUSTOMJEE CAMA and MUNCHERJEE 
CAWASJEE MURZBAN their heirs and assigns upon 
the trusts and to and for the ends intents and purposes 
hereinafter declared and contained concerning the same. 

NOW THIS INDENTURE 

WITNESSETH that in pursuance of 
the said agreement and in consideration of the premises 
they the said JOHN ALEXANDER JAMES SHAW and 
KURSONDASS NENSEE do and each* of them doth 

hereby grant release convey and 

assure and the said NOWROJEE 
NANABHOY FRAMJEE doth hereby grant release 

51 



402 HIS1ORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

convey assure and confirm unto the said KURSHEDJEE 
RUSTOMJEE CAMA and MUNCHERJEE CAWASJEE 

MURZBAN their heirs and assigns 
^Trustees ALL THAT piece Qr parce j Qf 

foras freehold land or ground and 
premises formerly and now vacant situate at Bellasis 

Road on the South side of the said 
Parcels. .; -,-,., <. ^ 

road in the sub-district of Mazagaon 

in the Island of Bombay containing by admeasurement Ten 
thousand and eight hundred square yards or thereabouts 
registered in the books of the Collector of Land Revenue 
under Nos. 100 and 101 and bounded as follows : that is 
to say on the East and North by property belonging to 
the Bank of Bombay on the West by property belonging 
to Jehangeer Nusserwanjee and on the South partly by 
property belonging to the estate of the late Luxuman 
Govindjee and partly by property belonging to the said 
Bank of Bombay TOGETHER WITH all ways, waters, 

wells, trees, liberties, privileges, ease- 
General Words 

ments,advantages and appurtenances 

whatsoever to the said piece or parcel of land and premi- 
ses hereby granted released conveyed assured and con- 
firmed or expressed and intended so to be or any of them 
or any part thereof belonging or in any wise appertaining 

AND ALL THE ESTATE right 
Estate Clause. , 

title and interest whatsoever both 

at law and in equity of them the said JOHN ALEXAN- 
DER JAMES SHAW, KURSONDASS NENSEE AND 
NOWROJEE NANABHOY FRAMJEE or of any of them 
in to or out of the said piece or parcel of land and pre- 
mises and every part thereof TO 
HAVE AND TO HOLD the said 
piece or parcel cf land hereditaments and premises hereby 
granted released conveyed assured and confirmed or 
expressed and intended so to be with the appurte- 
nances UNTO AND TO THE USE of the said 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 403 

KHURSHEDJEE RUSTOMJEE CAMA and MUN- 
CHERJEE CAWASJEE MURZBAN their heirs and 
assigns upon and for the trusts intents and purposes 
and with under and subject to the powers provisos agree- 
ments and declarations hereinafter declared and con- 

tained or referred to of and con- 
Trusts of Settlement, cerning the same AND IT IS HE- 

REBY AGREED AND DECLARED 
that the said KHURSHEJDEE RUSTOMJEE CAMA and 
MUNCHERJEE CAWASJEE MURZBAN their heirs 
and assigns shall stand seized of the said piece or parcel 
of land hereditaments and premises UPON TRUST FOR 
the members for the time being of the said LODGE 

RISING STAR OF WESTERN 
Cestuis-que-trust. INDIA No. 342 working under the 

GRAND LODGE OF SCOTLAND 
and to permit the erection thereon of a building to be call- 
ed " THE FRAMJEE CAWASJEE MASONIC HALL " 

for the use of the said members of 
Erection of the the said LODGE RISING STAR OF 
Hall WESTERN INDIA No. 342 AND 



IT IS HEREBY FURTHER 

AGREED AND DECLARED that if it shall hereafter 

be determined not to build the 

Determination by sa i<j jj a u on t h e j an( j hereinbefore 
cestuis-q e-trust not 

to build a Hall. described and hereby granted con- 

veyed released and assured the said 

KHURSHEDJEE RUSTOMJEE CAMA and MUNCHER- 

JEE CAWASJEE MURZBAN or the survivor of them or 

the heirs of such survivor (herein- 

At request of cestuis- after called the trustees or trustee) 

que-trust trustees to 

sell or exchange. shall at the request in writing of the 

majority of the mejnbers for the 
time being of the said LODGE RISING STAR OF 
WESTERN INDIA No. 342 dispose of all or any of the 
said premises either by way of sale or in exchange for 



404 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

other hereditaments upon such terms and under such 
conditions as the said KHURSHEDJEE RUSTOMJEE 
CAMA and MUNCHERJEE CAW AS JEE MURZBAN or 
the survivor of them or the heirs of such survivor shall 
think fit and may revoke the trusts and powers then 
subsisting in the hereditaments so sold or disposed of 
in exchange and appoint the same to such uses and in 
such manner as shall be expedient to effectuate such sale 

or exchange AND IT IS HEREBY 
Receipt of trustees. DECLARED that the receipt of the 

said trustees or trustee for any 
monies paid to them or him upon any sale or for equality 
of exchange under the power of sale and exchange here- 
inbefore contained shall effectually discharge the persons 
paying the same therefrom and from being concerned to 
see to the application thereof AND IT IS HEREBY 
DECLARED that the said trustees or trustee shall at 

the like request lay out the money 



* exchan P ged Deceived upon any sale or for equality 
land. of exchange either in the purchase of 

land in the Island of Bombay to be 
settled upon the trusts and subje2t to the powers hereby 
limited or in the erection or towards the erection of a 
building on any land belonging to the Masonic Body 
, working under the Grand Lodge of Scotland subject to 
the condition that such building shall be called " THE 
FRAMJEE CAW AS JEE MASONIC HALL " AND IT 

IS HEREBY FURTHER DE- 
interim investment. CLARED.that until the money to be 

received upon any sale or for equal" 
ity of exchange shall be laid out as aforesaid the said 
trustees or trustee may with the consent of the majority 
of the said members invest the same in their or his names 
or name in Promissory Notes of the Government of India 
but in no other mode of investment AND IT IS HEREBY 
DECLARED "that until the said building to be called 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 405 

" THE FRAMJEE CAW-AS JEE MASONIC HALL " 

shall be erected the said trustees or trustee shall apply 

the income to arise from the said 

Use of income of land or land taken in exchange or 

trust premises. from the secu rities on which the 

proceeds of land sold shall be invest- 
ed in or towards the payment of the rent of a building to 
be called "THE FRAMJEE CAWASJEE MASONIC 
HALL" to be used for the purposes aforesaid I ROVID- 
ED ALWAYS and it is hereby further declared that if 

the said LODGE RISING STAR 

Ultimate trust in QF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 

event of dissolution 

of Lodge Rising star, shall from any cause whatever cease 
to exist the said trustees or trustee 
shall stand seized or possessed of the said land or any land 
to be taken in exchange as aforesaid and the proceeds 
of any land sold and so far as they can of the building to 
be erected and called " THE FRAMJEE CAWASJEE 
MASONIC HALL" for the members for the time 
being or such other Lodge working under the Grand 
Lodge of Scotland asi the said trustee or trustees shall 
think fit upon the trusts and to and for the ends intents 
and purposes and with under and subject to the powers 
provisions and declarations hereinbefore contained or 
such of them as shall be then subsisting or capable of 
taking effect AND IT IS HEREBY DECLARED that if 
the said trustees hereby appointed 
Appointment of or either of them or any trustee or 

new trustees. 

trustees to be appointed as herein- 
after is mentioned shall die or desire to be discharged or 
refuse or become incapable to act then and so often the 
majority of the said members or in the event of the dis- 
solution of the said Lodge the surviving or continuing or 
the executors of the surviving trustee, may appoint a new 
trustee or new trustees in the stead of -the trustee or 
trustees so dying or desiring to be discharged or refusing 



406 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

or becoming incapable to act and upon every such appoint- 
ment the said trust premises shall be so transferred that 
the same may become vested in the new trustee or 
trustees jointly with the surviving or continuing trustee 
or solely as the case may require and every such new 
trustee shall (as well before as after the said trust 
premises shall have become so vested) have the same 
power authorities and discretion as 
^Indemnity of Trus- . f he had been hereby or igi na n y 

appointed a trustee AND IT IS 
HEREBY DECLARED that the trustees for the time 
being of these presents shall be respectively chargeable 
only with such monies as they respectively shall actually 
receive and shall not be answerable for each other nor 
for any banker broker or other person in whose hands 
any of the trust moneys shall be placed nor for the in- 
sufficiency or deficiency of any securities nor otherwise 
for involuntary losses and that the said trustees may 
respectively reimburse themselves out of the trust pre- 
mises all expenses incurred in or 
Covenants against about the execution of the aforesaid 
sft^rdTheVu"! trusts and powers AND each of 
tees of his firm. them the said JOHN ALEXANDER 

JAMES SHAW KURSONDASS 
NENSEE and NOWROJEE NANABHOY FRAMJEE so 
far as relates to his own acts doth hereby for himself his 
heirs executors and administrators covenant with the said 
KHURSHEDJEE RUSTOMJEE CAMA and MUNCHER- 
JEE CAWASJEE MURZBAN their heirs and assigns- 
that they the said JOHN ALEXANDER JAMES SHAW 
KURSONDASS NENSEE and NOWROJEE NANA- 
BHOY FRAMJEE respectively have not done or know- 
ingly suffered or bepn party or privy to anything where- 
by the said piece or parcel of land and premises herein- 
before described and hereby granted released conveyed 
assured and confirmed or intended so to be or any part 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 407 

thereof are is or can be impeached incumbered or affected 

in title estate or otherwise howso- 

Testimonium. ever IN WITNESS WHEREOF 

the said JOHN ALEXANDER 

JAMES SHAW KURSONDASS NENSEE and NOW- 

ROJEE NANABHOY FRAMJEE KHURSHEDJEE 
RUSTAMJEE CAMA and MUNCHERJEE CAWASJEE 
MURZBAN have hereunto set their respective hands 
and seals the day and year first above written. 

1 (Sig.) JNO. A. J. SHAW. O 
Signed sealed and deli- j KURSONDASS 



vered by the above 
named John Alexander 
James Shaw Cursondass I 
Nensee Nowrojee Nana- I 
bhoyFramjeeKhurshed- [ 
jee Rustamjee Cama and 
Muncherjee Cawasjee ( 
Murzban in the presence | 



NENSEE. 
NOWROJEE NA 



CAMA. 



of MUNCHERJEE 

j CAWASJEE MURZBAN.Q 
(Signed) GEORGE S. LYNCH, 

Bombay, Solicitor. 
(ENDORSEMENTS.) 

Messrs. Jno. A. J. Shaw and Cursondass Nensee (trus- 
tees of the Estate of Sprabjee Pestonjee Framjee, Now- 
rojee Nanabhoy Framjee and Merwanjee Jamshedjee) 
Nowrojee Nanabhoy Framjee Cursetjee Rustamjee Cama 
and Muncherjee Cawasjee Murzban (gentlemen) execu- 
ting parties residing in Bombay admit execution. All are 
known to the Registrar. 

(Signed) JNO. A. J. SHAW. 

KURSONDASS NENSEE. 

NOWROJEE XANABHOY 

FRAMJEE. 

KHURSHEDJEE RUSTAM- 
JEE CAMA. 
MUNCHERJEE CAWASJEE 

MURSBAN, 
(Signed) B. DADABHOY, 

Registrar of Bombay. 
3rd May 1870, 



408 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

Registered No. 32 A at pages 136 to 145, Vol. 16 of 
Book No. 1. 

(Signed) B. DADABHOY, 
[ Seal, ) Registrar of Bombay. 

30th May 1870. 

Register No fc 3 ' Collector's No. 100 and 101 

Old Survey No. 82 and New Survey No. 1/6909. 

The foregoing deed of transfer of land has been duly 

registered in the Register Book (marked letter A) of the 

Foras Freehold property in the Island of Bombay, which 

I hereby certify. 

(Signed) F. F. ARBUTHNOT, 

Collector. 
Bombay, Collector's Office, 12th May 1877. 

Registered. 
S 721-2000-277 



APPENDIX 0. 

Bombay, 18th December 1872. 
To 

J. N. DADY, ESQ., 

Worshipful Master, Lodge Cyrus. 
Dear Sir and Worshipful Brother- 
It has recently come to my knowledge that some Hindu 
gentlemen are about to be initiated in Lodge Cyrus 
of which you are the Worshipful Master. 

The subject of admitting Hindus into Freemasonry 
has been very frequently discussed without any definite 
result. Very 'greaj and careful consideration has at all 
times been paid to this important question by individual 
Lodges, and it lias been viewed in the most favourable 
light possible, but the conclusions arrived at, by each 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3*2 S.C. 409 

body, was that no methodical or systematic rules could 
be laid down by one particular Lodge how and in what 
manner Hindus could be admitted into Freemasonry, 
and each Lodge thought that such a question could not be 
settled by one single Lodge but by all the Lodges meeting 
on this side of Western India. 

I therefore deem it my paramount duty to acquaint you 
that this question has already been discussed by indivi- 
dual Lodges, in the hope that you may not take any hasty 
step in a matter which requires'to be carefully arranged 
and systematically put through. 

I think your Lodge would be incurring a grave respon- 
sibility were you not to pay any attention to the experi- 
ence of the past and proceed to initiate the candidates 
- in question. 

In my humble opinion, it would be better if you were to 
hold a conference with your sister Lodges, both English 
and Scotch, and there discuss this subject which, as it 
does, affects the interest of every Freemason throughout 
the globe- 

No one is more willing than myself to see the Hindus 
enrolled amongst us, for I cannot shut my eyes to the 
fact that if this can be done without doing any violencg 
to the spirit of our Order, all the caste prejudices which 
grind down the Hindus would melt away under the be- 
nign influence of Freemasonry and create a social revo- 
lution in India. 

The great importance that 'I at : :a2h to this subject is 
my only apology for troubling you with this long letter, 
and I have to request you to be good enoygh to read 
it to your Lodge before you proceed ,to ballot for the 
candidates. 

I have not had time to communicate with all the mem- 
bers of my Lodge upon the subject, but I have consulted 

52 



410 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

with many of the oldest members and they are all at one 
with me. 

I remain, 
Dear Sir and Worshipful Brothers, 

Yours faithfully, 



D. R. CHICHGUR, 

Worshipful Master, Lodge Rising Star. 

APPENDIX P. 

Lodge Rising Star of Western India, 

No. -342 S. C. 



nombay, 1st March 1879. 
To Right Worshipful Brother. 
The Hon'ble JAMES GIBBS, C-S.I. 

District Grand Master of Bombay, E. C., 

Honorary Member of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India, etc. 

Right Worshipful Sir and Beloved Brother, 

We, the Master, Past Masters, Officers and Members 
of Rising Star of Western India, in open Lodge assemb- 
led, greet you with mingled feelings of delight and regret 
on this, probably the last' occasion of your attending 
amongst us in your capacity of a fellow-member. 

Your high position in our venerable Order, harmoniously 
blending with your distinguished public and social 
rank, has demanded from 'you, Right Worshipful Sir, 
towards the discharge of your high Masonic functions, the 
continued exercise of rare qualities both of the head and 
the heart for a series of years. The ability, the zeal, 
and the judiciousness which you have invariably brought 
to bsar on the administration of that section of the Craft 
which has had the good fortune to enjoy your rule, have 



'OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 411 

contributed to . strengthen its hold and develop its use- 
fulness during your tenure of office in a very marked 
degree ; while your urbanity, large-heartedness, and 
benevolence of spirit have won for you among Masons 
generally that regard, esteem, and attachment which find 
but an inadequate expression in the numerous valedic- 
tory demonstrations which have been set on foot this 
season in your honour. 

It would be encroaching on the privilege assumed by 
both the Grand Lodges were we to particularise and dwell 
here upon the great and abiding benefits which your tact 
and prudence, combined with the influence of your per- 
sonal and Masonic dignity, have conferred on the cause 
of Masonry in this Presidency. The relationship between 
the English and Scotch bodies has been closer and the 
co-operation of each with the other freer during your 
tenure of office than it had been in the past, and we 
cannot refrain from expressing how much this pleasing 
result was owing to your discretion and geniality of dis- 
position. To your responsive co-operation, Right Wor- 
shipful Sir, was in a great measure due the accomplish- 
ment of that arrangement which the members of .both 
the Constitutions. had for a long time past looked upon as 
the best means of effecting the much desired alliance 
between them, that by which the Lodges of both tlie ' 
Constitutions meet under one roof now. 

Thus, Right Worshipful Sir, while your great influence 
and judicious efforts in a higher capacity .than that of 
member of an individual -Lodge have promoted the 
interests of Masonry in general, the privilege which this 
Lodge has enjoyed of bearing upon it's rolls your distin- 
guished name almost from the beginnii^g of its career, has 
naturally contributed to increase its .prestige in an ap- 
preciable degree. We are proud to trace your connection 
with this the first Lodge that extended the benefits of 



412 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the Craft to the sons of India, from a d#te when many 
of its younger members were not born. Your wide sym- 
pathies with the people of the country, and your far- 
reaching endeavours to ^secure their well-being, have 
imparted to your name a character which eminently 
justifies its appearance among the names of those who 
under the leadership of its eminent and Worshipful 
Brother Doctor Burnes, threw open to them the portals of 
Masonry now thirty-.fi ve years ago- And your unbroken 
connection with this lodgfe heretofore is a circumstance 
which, while it testifies to your zeal in advancing the 
cause which the Lodge represents, proves, we venture to 
believe, that throughout its long career, it has striven to 
do its work and maintain the prestige of its 'auspicious 
origin jn a manner which has enlisted the approval of so 
eminent a Mason as yourself. 

Some years a-go, Right Worshipful Sir, you? fellow- 
.members expressed their recognition of your unswerving 
attachment to this Lodge and of your high Masonic 
worth, by translating your name to -the list of its hono- 
rary members and by voting you the highest honour in 
their gift, the Fundator's Medal. These measures have 
so far rivetted your connection with this Lodge that no 
distance of situation can make a difference in the refa- 
tionship which it claims with you. And though we sin- 
cerely regret your approaching departure from these 
shores, in that we shall miss your genial presence and 
mature judgment on important occasions in future, .we 
gladly seize this opportunity of assuring you, Right 
Worshipful Sir, that as in the annals of this Lodge, so in 
the recesses of our hearts, your beloved name will al- . 
ways be fondly retained. We now bid you farewell and 
earnestly pray the Crand Architect of the Universe that 
He may be pleased to grant you, in your honoured retire- 
ment, many years of enjoyment and usefulness in a yet 
broader Masonic sphere. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 842 S.C. 413 

Accept, Right- Worshipful Sir, the parting assurance of 
our deep attachment and fraternal regard,, and 

Believe us to remain, 
With profound respect, 
Your faithful Brethren, 
HORMUSJI DADABHOY 
HENRY MORLAND 

M'ANECKJI CURl&TJI 

K. R. CAMA 
M. C. MURZBAN 
D. R. CHICHGUR 
P. M. MEHTA 
R. M. FATELL 

NOWROJI FURDOONJI 

J. D. WADIA 
JEHANJIR GUSTADJI 
H. M. CHICHGUR 

R. M. CHICHGUR 



. M. M. BHOWNAGREE 

M. D. DOCTOR . . 

and others. 

The Worshipful Master then handed tlie address to 
Right Worshipful Brother Gibbs amid loud applause. 

Right Worshipful Brother James Gibb?, whose rising 
was loudly cheered, then said that when he looked back 
to the time, the first occasion that is, when he attended 
Lodge Rising Star, which" was so far a!S he recollected in 
August or September 1847, he recollected that there were 
then in it only a few members of the Parsee community 
and one or two of the Mahomedan, Lodge Rising Star was 



414 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

then, as they were probably aware, a siste'r Lodge to Per- 
severance, the members of which were also members, of 
Lodge Rising Star. When he looked back to those days he 
recollected that there was then only one English lodge in 
Bombay and one for the admission of natives. Now 
he found that among the number of Lodges over which 
he had the honuor to rule these nine years, there 
were two Parsee, one Hindu, and eleven European 
Lodges. He was glad to mention in passing that 
within the last few yea'rs European Lodges had also 
multiplied, so that there was some inherent good 
agency at work in Freemasonry if it could induce 
Europeans not only to bring masonry into this country 
and practise it, but practise it so as to imjpel the natives 
to seek admissi'on under its banners. The- humble 
services which he (the speaker) had rendered to the cause 
were dilated upon in very flattering terms in the good 
address which they had just heard read. In whatever 
positions he happened to be placed, he endeavoured to 
perform his duties diligently, and if his exertions had 
been attended by success that fact was mainly due to 
the zealous support of his collaborateurs, both European 
and native. If, again, his relationship with the natives 
had been pleasant and such as to meet with their ap- 
proval, it.was owing, in the first instance, to his having 
been brought up at home under those, and secondly, to 
his having passed the first years of his service in this 
country under men with whom the welfare of the natives 
of India was a principal aim. He had tried to follow in 
the footsteps of his uncle, who belonged to the- Civil 
Service in India, .and who rose to be the Governor of 
Bombay. He was also indebted for his habits of kindly 
intercourse with the people of this country to other 
connections of his, principally the father of the Briga- 
dier-General commanding this division. From them he 
learned the good old-fashioned feeling the Europeans in 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 415 

India of those days entertained towards its people. He 
had the good fortune of serving his apprenticeship under 
the two brothers Frere also, and he, (the speaker) thought 
he had superior opportunities in his early career of 
learning from that able class of civilians the proper 
behaviour towards the natives of this country. It was, 
the Right Worshipful Brother observed, a hard thing now 
to say farewell to that country. He had begun to say 
that word within the last fortnight, and would have to 
continue saying it over and over again for some days, 
and it was all the harder to utter to a person who felt 
as he felt then, like a great tree, that was granting a tree 
to have the sense of feeling, which having been planted 
and grown and thriven in a soil was to be torn up by the 
root and transplanted elsewhere. He felt he was going 
to be submitted to that process, and it was impossible for 
him under that feeling to go on speaking further. He 
would, therefore, conclude hy saying that wherever he 
might go, he would always remember the kindness re- 
ceived from tha people of this country by him, especially 
the kindness he had received from his masonic brethren 
during the last days of his residence among them. 
Wherever he might* go and whatever duty he might be 
called upon to perform in future, he would always retain 
a lively interest for the good of the country in which be 
had passed a period of an ordinarily long life to which 
he could look back with pleasure and satisfaction. He 
promised that the reception accorded him that eyening 
would never be forgotten, and in heartily thanking the 
brethren for the very kind address they presented to 
him, he hoped to hand it down to his children after him, 
and possibly to his children's children, so that it would 
at all events serve as a memorial to inform, them that 
their father and possibly their ancestor was a member 
of Lodge Rising Star and was beloved and respected in 
such kindly terms by his-fellow members. 



,416 



HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 
APEPENDIX Q. 



Court Fee 
Stiamp 
Rs. 6. 



Court Fee 
Stamp 
Rs. 2. 



IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUDICATURE AT 
BOMBAY. ORDINARY ORIGINAL CIVIL 
JURISDICTION. 



SUIT NO. 352 OF 1897. 
(1) Pestonji Manockji Kanga, 
Bombay, Parsee, an attorney of this 
Honourable Court, residing in Bombay, 
at No. 39, Charni Road, without the 
Fort ; (2) Jijibhoy Framji Petit, also 
of Bombay, Parsee, residing in 
Bombay, on the Altamount Road, 
without the Fort; and (3) Framji 
Jivanji Patel, also of Bombay, Parsee, 



Coram Fulton, J. 



Victoria by the 
Grace of God of 
the United King- 
dom of Great Bri- 



and 



residing in Bombay, at No- 10, Church 

Gate Street, within the Fort, the , Q Defender 

Master, the Senior Warden and the j Q ^ 

Junior Warden, respectively, of Lodge ! press O f 

Rising Star of Western India, No. ' 

342, on the R}lls of the Grand Lodge 

o Scotland for themselves and on 

behalf of all other members, of the 

said Lodge Rising Star of Western 

India. . ] 

Vs. 

(1) Kharsedji Rustomji Cama,^ 
of Bombay, Parsee, residing in I 



Plaintiffs. 



Bombay, at Malabar Hill, without 



the Fort ; and (2 c j Khan Bahadur 
Muncherji Cowasji Mur^ban, Com- 
panion of the M*ost Eminent Order of J 



Defendants. 



OF WESTERN INDIA No.' 342 S.C. 417 

the Indian Empire, residing in" 

Bombay on the Esplanade Road, 

without the Fort, Trustees of the >- Defendants- 

Indenture of Settlement hereinafter | 

referred to. J 

The plaintiffs pray that the defendants may be direct- 
ed to transfer and make over to the Committee, referred 
to in paragraph six of the plaint, the monies and 
securities held by them as Trustees of the Indenture of 
Settlement of the third day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy (less their and the defendants' 
costs, charges, and expenses) upon the members of the 
said Committee (not as such members only but for and 
on behalf of the persons for the time being owners of the 
Masonic Temple referred to in the fifth paragraph of the 
plaint and so as to bind the said temple) agreeing in 
writing to name the Banqueting Hall of the said Temple 
" The Framji Cowasji Banqueting Hall " and to erect and 
maintain a tablet in a conspicuous part of the said Hall 
bearing an inscription in the words or to the effect 
of the resolution set forth in the letter of the Honorary 
'Secretary to the Hall Committee to the defendants, 
dated the twelfth day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-six, copy whereof is annexed as 
Exhibit D to the plaint, and further agreeing to such 
other proposals for the due carrying out of the said 
agreement of the said Committee as to the said Lodge 
Rising Star may seem proper. (2) That the costs, 
charges, and expenses of this suit may be provided for. 
(3) That all other proper directions may be given 
and orders made as to this Honourable Court may seem 
meet. And the suit being this day called on for hearing 
and final disposal, the plaintiffs and the defendants 
appearing respectively by Advocates, and- upon hearing 
evidence and perusing exhibits and upon hearing the 
said Advocates, This Court doth order and decree that 

53 



418 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

upon the members of the said Committee (not as such 
members only but for and on behalf of the persons for 
the time being owners of the said Temple and so as to 
bind the said Temple) agreeing in writing with the 
defendants as Trustees of the said Indenture of the third 
day of May, one thousand eight hundred and seventy, 
copy whereof is annexed to the plaint and marked A, to 
name the Banqueting Hall of the said Temple " The Framji 
Gowasji Banqueting Hall" and to erect and maintain a 
tablet in a conspicuous part of the said Hall bearing an 
inscription in the words or to the effect of the resolution 
set forth in the letter of the Honorary Secretary to the 
said Committee to the defendants, dated the twelfth day 
of May, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-six (copy 
of which is hereto annexed) and upon the said Committee 
further agreeing in writing to such other proposals for 
the due carrying out of the said agreement of the said 
Committee as to the Lodge Rising Star in the plaint men- 
tioned may seem proper, the defendants do transfer and 
make over to the said Committee the monies and securities 
held by the said defendants as Trustees of the said 
Indenture of Settlement of the third day of May, one 
thousand eight hundred and seventy (less the said 
defendants' and plaintiffs' costs, charges, and expenses), 
and This Court doth further order that the receipt of the 
said Committee for the time being shall be a sufficient 
discharge to the said defendants as Trustees in respect 
of the said monies and securities directed so to be 
transferred and made over as aforesaid, and this Court 
'doth further order that the costs of this suit of the 
plaintiffs and the defendants as between attorney and 
client be paid out of the said trust funds, and this 
Court doth reserve further directions and any of the 
parties shall be at liberty to apply to the Court as 
there may be occasion. Witness, Sir Charles Frederick 
Farran, Knight, Chief Justice at Bombay, aforesaid, this 



OF WESTERN INDIA No: 342 S.C- 419 

seventeenth day of January, one thousand eight hundred 
and ninety-eight. 

By the Court, 

j. W. ORR, 
Prothonotary. 

\ L. N. BANAJI. 
Seal. 
V / The llth day of March 1898. 

The seal of the 
High Court at 
Bombay. 

Decree drawn on application of 
Messrs. NANU & HORMUSJI, 

Plaintiffs' Attorneys. 

Certified to be a true copy. 

This llth day of March 1898. 
L. N. BANAJI, 
for Prothonotary. 

(Letter referred to in the foregoing decree.) 

Masonic Hall, Byculla, 

Bombay, 12th May 1896. 
To 

K.. R. CAMA, ESQR., 

KHAN BAHADUR M. C. MURZBAN, C.I.E., 

Trustees of the FRAM Ji COWASJI 

MASONIC Hall Fund, 

BOMBAY. 
Gentlemen, 

The Sub-Committee for arranging for the erection of 
the proposed Freemasons' Hall for the^joint use of all the 
Masonic Bodies meeting in Bombay, desire me to inform 
you that in the event of your being able to ^contribute as a 
donation to the funds to be applied in acquiring the pro- 



420 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

posed site from Government on a leasehold tenure of 200 
(two hundred) years, and the erection of the Hall the 
Rs. 13,000 about held by you on the trusts created by the 
late Wor. Bro. N. N. Framji of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India, or that amount less the expenses of obtain- 
ing advice and sanction, the Sub-Committee will undertake 
that there shall be erected in the Hall a tablet bearing the 
following inscription : 

" The Framji Cowasji Masonic Banqueting Hall. 
Part of the expenses of the erection of this Hall was met 
by the contribution of funds held on the trusts created by 
the late Wor. Bro. N. N. Framji of Lodge Rising Star of 
Western India, No. 342 S.C., and by the leave of the High 
Court in accordance with which this Hall is to be called 
by the above name." 

It is essential that the Sub-Committee should be 
informed at an early date whether the proposed under- 
taking will be satisfactory to you and whether they may 
count on receiving the donation. 

Yours faithfully and fraternally, 

DARASHA R. CHICHGUR, 
Honorary Secretary, F. J. H. Committee. 



APPENDIX R. 



"Court 



Eight of Annas, j 



India. 

Bombay, 18th November 1898. 

To 

KHARSEDJI RUSTOMJI CAMA, ESQR., and 
KHAN BAHADUR MUNCHERJEE COWASJEE 

MURZBAN, CJ.E., 
Trustees of the Indenture of 
Settlement dated the 3rd day 
of May 1870, and made be 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S-C. 421 

tween John Alexander James 
Shaw and Kursondas Nensey 
of the first part, Nowrojee Na- 
nabhoy Framjee of the second 
part, and yourselves of the 
third part. 
DEAR SIRS, 

In consideration of your having transferred and made 
over to us the monies and securities held by you as such 
Trustees as aforesaid after payment of the costs, charges, 
and expenses of High Court Suit No. 352 of 1897 as 
directed by the Decree therein, bearing date the 17th day 
of January 1898, which monies and securities are 
specified in the Schedule A, hereto annexed, we, the 
undersigned members of the Committee which has charge 
of the erection and management of the Masonic Temple 
now in course of erection on the Esplanade in Bombay 
(not as such members only, but, for and on behalf of the 
persons for the time being, owners of the said Temple 
and so as to bind the said Temple), hereby agree with 
you as such Trustees as aforesaid and the Trustees for 
the time being of the said Indenture that the Banqueting 
Hall of the said Temple shall for ever be named ^and 
called simply " The Framji Cowasji Banqueting Hall" 
without any addition or qualification whatever, and that' 
a suitable tablet bearing the said title shall be affixed at 
the entrance of the said Hall or in a conspicuous part 
thereof, and that such tablet shall be at all times properly 
maintained and, further, that a member of Lodge Rising 
Star, to be nominated upon the election of the said 
Lodge by the Grand Master of All Scottish Freemasonry 
in India for the time being, shall be at all times a member 
of the Hall Committee. 



422 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

In Schedule B hereto is contained a description of the 
land on which the said temple is to be erected. 

Yours faithfully, 
R. S. Brown. 
I. M. Shields. 
A. Pell. 

P. D. Sopariwala. 
D. Gostling. 
C. D. Wise. 
J. A. Brandon. 
Edw. J. Smith. 
W. L. Harvey. 
W. E. Jennings. 
James Dunlop. 
Alex. McKenzie. 
Dinshaw Dorabjee Mistry. 
Nowrosji N. Wadia. 
R. M. Chichgur. 

Ghanasham Nilkanth Nacikarni. 
H. R. Hoyles. 
J. W. Hep worth. 
H. J. Gordon. 
Mirza Hoosein Khan. 
P. N. Wadia. 
Anandrao H. Kothare. 
Framroz R. Joshi 
^ N. J. Guzdar. 

Hormusjee M. Chichgur. 
Darasha Ruttonjee Chichgur. 
K. R. Cama. 
C. D. Furdoonjee. 

SCHEDULE A. 

Government securities of the nominal value of Rupees 
thirteen thousand and four hundred, Rupees one thou- 
sand five hundred ai?d twenty-one, annas seven and pie 

one in cash. 

SCHEDULE B. 

(Description of land.) 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 

APPENDIX S. 
To 

RIGHT WORSHIPFUL BROTHER 

KHURSHEDJBE RUSTOMJEE CAMA, 
Senior Past Master of Lodge 

Rising Star of Western India, No. 342, S.C. 
Right Worshipful Brother, 

On this auspicious occasion of the presentation to you 
of the Masonic Jubilee Volume published to commemorate 
the completion of your fifty years of Masonic life in 1904, 
we, the Master, Office-bearers and the Members of 
your Mother-Lodge, " Rising Star of Western India," 
No. 342, of the Scottish Constitution, beg to approach you 
with feelings of brotherly love and sentiments of respect- 
ful esteem. 

We beg to repeat our congratulations conveyed to you 
of the 24th of August of 1904, the 50th Anniversary of 
your initiation, and say that in congratulating you we 
congratulate ourselves for having among us an exemp- 
lary Freemason who has been always regular in his attend- 
ance; attentive to his duties, useful to the Craft in 
general and to his Lodge in particular, loyal in his obser- 
vance of the virtues preached by the Craft and zealous in 
upholding the prestige of Freemasonry as an useful irfsti- 
tution. We are proud to count you as one of our most 
dutiful, valued and useful brethren. 

Your public career as a citizen of Bombay has been 
held to be successful, and we, as your fellow Brother- 
Masons, are led to think that the credit of that success is 
greatly due to the fact of your having led a steady and 
well-disciplined life as a Freemason from your very early 
youth. 

In conclusion, we pray that the Great Architect of the 
Universe may enable you to serve as faithfully as ever 



424 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

the Craft in general, and this your Mother-Lodge in par- 
ticular, and to be useful to your fellow-brethren to the 
Honour and Glory of the Most High. 

DOSABHOY C. SETHNA, W.M. 
DOSABHOY FRAMJI DINSHAW PETIT, P.M. 

WADIA, I.P.M. PHIROZSHAH NUSSERWANJI 
RUSTOM M. CHICHGUR, P.M. PLEADER, P.M. 

MANECK D. DOCTOR, MANECK R. SETTNA 
TEMULJI BHICAJI ARDESHIR F. UNWALLA 

NARIMAN R. M. CHICHGUR, Acting 
RUSTOM K. R. CAMA Secretary 

PESTONJI M. KANGA SORAB C. HORMUSJI, S. W. 
PHIROZE C. SETHNA JAMSHED M. DOCTOR, J. VV. 
FRAMJI J- PATEL 

Bombay, 12th March 1907. 



APPENDIX T. 
No. 447. 

GRAND LODGE OF ALL SCOTTISH FREEMASONRY 

IN INDIA. 

Grand Secretary's Office, 

Wallace Street, Fort, 
Bombay, August 24th, 1909. 
THE RIGHT WORSHIPFUL MASTER, 

Lodge Rising Star of Western India, No. 342, 

Bombay. 
Dear Sir and Brother, 

I am directed by the most Worshipful Grand Master to 
convey, on his behalf and that of Grand Lodge, their most 
sincere sympathy in the irreparable loss that has so 
recently befallen*your Lodge. It is hardly necessary to 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 425 

dwell upon the late Right Worshipful Brother K, R. 
Cama's merits as a Mason, on his fidelity to the princi- 
ples of our Order they are household words to every 
Freemason in India. For fifty-six years, this " Grand 
Old Man " in the Craft held high the banner, never falter- 
ing or failing. A noble, well-nigh an unique example. 
Full of years and honour he has gone to his rest and, who 
can doubt it, to his well-earned reward. God 1 rest his soul. 

I am further to intimate that so soon as the necessary 
arrangements can be made, the Most Worshipful Grand 
Master has instructed me to summon a Special Communi- 
cation of Grand Lodge for the purpose of giving expres- 
sion to our sorrow. Though your Lodge is individually 
affected, the death of this great and distinguished Brother 
has a far wider signification. For very many years he 
was one of the pillars of Grand Lodge, earnest, zealous, 
whole-hearted : his loss will leave a gap which can never 
be filled in Scottish Freemasonry in India during this 
generation. 

Further notice of the Special Communication will be 
given you in due course. 
With sincere sympathy, 

I remain, 

Yours fraternally, 
ARTHUR W. WISE, 

G. Secretary. 

Lodge Rising Star of Western India, 

No. 343 S. C., 
4th September 1909. 
To 

MOST WORSHIPFUL BRO. COL. R. H. FORMAN, 

Grand Master, A. S. F. I. 
Most Worshipful Sir, 

I am in receipt of the Grand Secretary's letter of the 
24th ultimo, bearing No, 447, conveying to my Lodge the 



426 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

condolence of yourself and of the Grand Lodge in our 
bereavement caused by the death of the late R. W. Bro. 
K. R. Cama. 

We are deeply touched by the very sympathetic refer- 
ences made by you to our deceased brother and his work 
as a Mason, during the whole of his masonic career of 
over half a century, and I beg to express to you and the 
Grand Lodge our sincere acknowledgment of the cordial 
way in which your and their hearts have gone forth 
towards us in this dark hour of our grief. 

The loss to the Craft is indeed great, but to our Lodge 
it is specially so and quite irreparable. The deceased 
was the child of our Lodge, and from the day he entered 
its sacred walls in 1854 he continued to be a subscribing 
member thereof until his death, which alone has now 
separated him from us- 

From the very commencement of his Masonic life, he 
showed signs of a vigorous and healthy emulation to do 
what was best for the greatest good, and evinced a strong 
desire to maintain inviolate and spread the genuine tenets 
of the Order fearlessly and steadfastly, and worked with 
a whole heart to promote the welfare of the Lodge, and, 
above all, strove to maintain its reputation and prestige, 
which he regarded and taught every one of us to regard, 
as ( a sacred trust. The Masonic details about our distin- 
guished Brother will bear the closest scrutiny, and will be 
vouched by the best sources of authority and will be 
found to be full of interest and instruction and a fit 
subject for study. 

As a Freemason he was, we venture to say, one 
of the most accomplished craftsmen, and at the same 
time, thoroughly earnest in all he did, sincerely 
anxious to be helpf al, and coura leous in the expression 
of his convictions which were always honest and 
well-founded. His sage counsels, born of his great 
knowledge and experience, his independence of 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 3.^2 S.C. 427 

thought and action, his consistent advocacy of 
" principle'' which he on all occasions, without exception, 
unhesitatingly and scrupulously protected and enforced 
his high sense of discipline and honour in everything 
he said or did and above all his great strength of 
character, in which he yielded to none, always stood 
our Lodge in good stead and called forth a deserving 
tribute to his incalculable worth and helped to most 
happy and satisfactory solutions of the difficulties that at 
any time confronted us. His genial presence amongst us 
was always an ennobling and educating influence, especi- 
ally so as he was singularly free (and a rare instance so 
far) from affectation or condescension and never betrayed 
himself either in word or deed into forgetfulness of 
Masonic lessons, but his whole conduct was regulated 
entirely by a high sense of honour and industry in 
investigation of subjects that affected the vital interests 
of, the Lodge and by an equally high sense of duty to the 
Lodge. 

We looked up to him, Most Worshipful Sir, as our 
guide and leader and we never found that our appeal was 
not responded to nor that our confidence was misplaced. 
In fact he, full of years, knowledge and experience, sought 
ever the younger members of the body and was to them a 
teacher and considered it always his duty, voluntarily and 
unsought, to assist them as best he could. 

Unassuming to a degree and never known to show 
anger or malice he led a blameless, selfless and spotless 
Masonic life and was a very pattern for imitation by 
reason of his sterling and incomparable qualities and his 
thorough equipment for the responsible offices he held 
either in the Lodge or in the Grand Lodge and the exem- 
plary and diligent discharge thereof Jn spite of his many- 
sided activities in public life outside the pale of Masonry. 

Most W T orshipful Sir, our distinguished Brother was 
the very embodiment of " plain living and Jiigh thinking" 



428 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

in the Masonic world and his loyalty to his mother Lodge 
and the Grand Lodge of A. S. F. I. and the Grand Lodge 
of Scotland was deep-seated, consistent, steadfast and 
unswerving. He was, if 1 may be permitted to say so, a 
beacon-light in the Craft, at all times according safe 
guidance. 

Always full of vigour and desirous of being useful 
he, as is well known, was most regular and punctual in 
his attendances and never omitted to attend a meeting 
either of the Lodge or of the Standing Committee or any 
sub-committee and it may be noted here that he attended 
even the very last meeting of the Lodge a fortnight before 
his death and of the Standing Committee only three days 
before that sad event took place. 

A Brother who was such a venerable and staunch 
friend has left us, but with an undeniable claim to our 
esteem, veneration and gratitude for all times. He has 
laft us the residuary legatees of his good wishes and the 
devisees of his Masonic example. 

Most Worshipful Sir, the death of a Brother such as our 
distinguished helpmate, who w r as one of the most illustri- 
ous Past Masters of our Lodge and was universally 
admired and respected in the whole of the Masonic sphere 
where he made his power and influence felt in a marked 
decree, cannot be too deeply mourned. To our Lodge it 
has dealt a blow from which it will be almost impossible 
1 to recover. It is the severest blow, I may say, the Lodge 
has suffered, ever since the demise of the late Right Wor- 
shipful Brother Maneckji Cursetji, the Patriarch and 
Founder of Freemasonry for Indians on this side of our 
Presidency. It will thus be readily understood how deeply 
we deplore the loss. The Great Architect of the Universe 
has however in his Bivine Dispensation called our Brother 
to the regions of Eternity where he will be able to render 
an unimpeachable account of himself and live for ever to 
do much nobler work than that performed in this transi- 



OF WESTERN INDIA No. 342 S.C. 429 

tory world. His memory is all that now remains to us, 
with his undying work done during life, and this we 
shall cherish for ever and from it we will now seek 
light. May his remains find a peaceful repose ! 

Most Worshipful Sir, we highly appreciate the honor 
which, as is intimated by the Grand Secretary, is to be 
paid to our deceased Brother at a Special Communication 
of the Grand Lodge, and in view of it we have refrained 
from holding in his memory a Lodge of Sorrow, a 
merited tribute, which we would otherwise have paid to 
departed worth. 

We claim to join, with all Freemasons in the expres- 
sion of grief, but we also claim to make the declaration 
that our Brother's death has created a void which will 
not readily be filled and that for the deceased to have 
won golden opinion from such authorities as yourself is 
itself sufficient praise. 

Again thanking you on behalf of myself and my Lodge 
for your kind sympathy, 

I remain, 

Most Worshipful Sir, 
Yours fraternally, 
D. R. WADIA, W.M 



20, Queen's Road, Fort, Bombay. 

September 8th, 1909. 
Dear Brother Wadia, 

1 echo and endorse every word you have written. 
Right Worshipful Brother Cama was indeed the type of 
Mason that every one of us should strive to emulate. 
Naturally, I did not know him as intimately as some of 
those who had been associated with him for many years ; 
still, I knew him well, and long ago learnt to regard him 
with the deepest respect, esteem and reverence. R. I. P. 



430 HISTORY OF LODGE RISING STAR 

It was because his Masonic influence was so wide- 
spread that I ventured to ask " Rising Star " to waive 
right on behalf of Grand Lodge in order that/ not only 
the members of his own Lodge, but the whole Fraternity 
might be accorded the opportunity of associating them- 
sei r es with a ceremony designed to show respect to his 
memory and sorrow for his loss. That "Rising Star" 
acceded to my request is a source of melancholy satisfac- 
tion to me. 

On Monday in Grand Chapter, I took the initial step 
towards perpetuating his memory. My own idea is : 

1. That we should put up a memorial tablet in the 
Hall and preferably, in my opinion, in the Sandhurst 
Temple. 

2. That Lodges, Chapters and individuals should be 
asked to subscribe to a Cama Memorial Benevolent Fund 
to be handed over to the S. M. B. G. I. and administered 
by it. 

The latter is, I think, peculiarly appropriate in that 
he was so keen an educationalist, and I feel sure that, 
were it possible to consult his wishes now, he would 
emphatically endorse a proposition which would associate 
his name with the succour of the poor and needy, rather 
than spend money, which might be usefully applied, in 
expensive portraits, or anything of that sort. 
With reiterated and deepest sympathy, 

Believe me, 

Sincerely and fraternally yours, 
R. H, FORMAN, 

Grand Master. 



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